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Could someone explain what coasting is, got a bit of an idea but not sure how I will know if I’m achieving it.
 

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Officially I guess it would have to be done in N, rolling along without using the motor nor regen, though I personally wouldn't advise this as you lose some control and ability to quickly accelerate again should you need to do so.

You can achieve something very similar if you are able to make tiny little adjustments to the accelerator pedal and make it so that you aren't consiming any power nor generating any through regen. If you can get it right at zero power use it's essentially the same thing.
 

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42k miles on public charging. Am I an expert yet?
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Coasting is taking a vehicle out of gear and attempting to drive it with no connection to the engine.

It's generally considered dangerous driving because you aren't in full control of the vehicle and taking back full control will take an extended amount of time.
 

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Coasting is taking a vehicle out of gear and attempting to drive it with no connection to the engine.

It's generally considered dangerous driving because you aren't in full control of the vehicle and taking back full control will take an extended amount of time.
Considering in an EV, ‘balancing the throttle’ so there’s no torque applied is exactly the same as switching to ‘neutral’, mechanically:

I’d love to know exactly why this is dangerous.
 

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Considering in an EV, ‘balancing the throttle’ so there’s no torque applied is exactly the same as switching to ‘neutral’, mechanically:

I’d love to know exactly why this is dangerous.
Coasting while balancing the throttle in an EV is not dangerous, I think the prevous posters were taking about the traditional meaning of coasting, which is performed in Netural, which could be considered dangerous because you need to re-engage a gear to react to an event that needs you to accelerate quickly.

If you can balance the throttle and neither use nor regen (or if your car has paddles to allow the disabling of regen) then this is coasting and will be the most effiicent way to travel on a level flat road.
 

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In the Zoe I can change from Neutral to Drive in 0.7 seconds.

Is that a quick enough response time?
 

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In the Zoe I can change from Neutral to Drive in 0.7 seconds.

Is that a quick enough response time?
You can travel a long way in that 0.7 seconds. Nearly 22 metres at 70mph. That 0.7 seconds could be the difference between having a collision and not.

There's also the time it would take you to realise that you need to re-engage the gear, as well. Probably not something you're thinking about in an emergency situation.
 

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You can travel a long way in that 0.7 seconds. Nearly 22 metres at 70mph. That 0.7 seconds could be the difference between having a collision and not.

There's also the time it would take you to realise that you need to re-engage the gear, as well. Probably not something you're thinking about in an emergency situation.
I was factoring in human reaction time.

I was just wondering why I might need to apply power in less than 0.7 seconds.

And why this might be different to, say, applying the brake?
 

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I mean it’s all bollocks isn’t it?

l’m currently driving an Audi Q2, petrol.

If I’m cruising in gear and mash the throttle, nothing happens. Literally nothing.

I need to change gear, then let the torque build. Then I might gently accelerate.

Whole process takes at least 10 seconds.
 

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I was factoring in human reaction time.

I was just wondering why I might need to apply power in less than 0.7 seconds.

And why this might be different to, say, applying the brake?
You're entitled to your opinion. I'm simply stating that the general consensus is that it's dangerous driving. Especially considering there is literally no good reason to do it.
 

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You're entitled to your opinion. I'm simply stating that the general consensus is that it's dangerous driving. Especially considering there is literally no good reason to do it.
I was just stating facts.

I’m glad you admit it’s just general opinion and not based on actual evidence.
 

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Highway Code:

Coasting in Neutral Gear

Rule 122: Coasting is a term describing a vehicle when it travels in neutral gear. You can also achieve coasting by depressing the clutch pedal. Coasting in a car can reduce driver control because:

  • Normal engine braking is usually eliminated.
  • The vehicle speed will increase quickly downhill.
  • An increased use of the footbrake can reduce its effectiveness.
  • Coasting can affect the steering response (particularly on corners).
  • It may be difficult to select the appropriate gear when required.
There you are that settles it, The highway code is an "Approved Code of Practice" which means in law and it is the basic standard that has to be met.
 

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I've tried coasting in my Leaf (just push the gear selector forwards once so N is dsiplayed) and I am somewhat surprised the electronics will allow it, but it does.

There is of course zero throttle response and zero regen, even when braking.

However, i found it to be pointless, because as has been said above, you can feather the throttle so no power is delivered and nor any regen. It's not easy to do using E-pedal mode so I never bother.

Some advocate coasting because they believe it extends their range if they don't need to slow down.

I should add that N in an EV is a virtual neutral since the wheels are never disconnected from the motor. This is claimed to be potentially damaging to the motor electronics as it can act as a generator with no load meaning the output voltage can exceed the built-in safety margin. (been argued to death in another thread but no conclusive proof it damages a Leaf)
 

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Occasionally I coast in neutral, down a straight stretch of country road (but only when safe to do so) I then give the brakes a work out to prevent then sticking due to lack of normal use. I would never admit to it, though :unsure:
 

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I suspect this has all got too technical and confused @TylerCello . If they were putting the car into neutral they would know that's what they were doing.

For practical purposes, as per the second para of post #2, coasting in an EV is where you have your foot on the accelerator just enough to neither use any power nor regenerate any. In the 2nd gen Leaf, that means not showing any blue OR any white bars on the power gauge. That's all there is to it.

The more you can do it the better your efficiency will be, rather than slowing down and regenerating then accelerating and using more power than you regenerated to get back up to speed. If regeneration was 100% efficient it wouldn't make any difference; it's not, so it does.
 

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Coasting is taking a vehicle out of gear and attempting to drive it with no connection to the engine.

It's generally considered dangerous driving because you aren't in full control of the vehicle and taking back full control will take an extended amount of time.
Based on this definition, it's not possible to coast in an electric vehicle ,( other than conversions which retain the ICE gearbox).
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
[/QUOTE]
I suspect this has all got too technical and confused @TylerCello . If they were putting the car into neutral they would know that's what they were doing.

For practical purposes, as per the second para of post #2, coasting in an EV is where you have your foot on the accelerator just enough to neither use any power nor regenerate any. In the 2nd gen Leaf, that means not showing any blue OR any white bars on the power gauge. That's all there is to it.

The more you can do it the better your efficiency will be, rather than slowing down and regenerating then accelerating and using more power than you regenerated to get back up to speed. If regeneration was 100% efficient it wouldn't make any difference; it's not, so it does.
Astolat , that’s it! That was the answer I was looking for. Thanks very much and also to everyone else with their interesting comments.
 

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You can travel a long way in that 0.7 seconds. Nearly 22 metres at 70mph. That 0.7 seconds could be the difference between having a collision and not.

There's also the time it would take you to realise that you need to re-engage the gear, as well. Probably not something you're thinking about in an emergency situation.
Do you have an example of an emergency situation where it would be safer to accelerate rather than brake?
 

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Highway Code:

Coasting in Neutral Gear

Rule 122: Coasting is a term describing a vehicle when it travels in neutral gear. You can also achieve coasting by depressing the clutch pedal. Coasting in a car can reduce driver control because:

  • Normal engine braking is usually eliminated.
  • The vehicle speed will increase quickly downhill.
  • An increased use of the footbrake can reduce its effectiveness.
  • Coasting can affect the steering response (particularly on corners).
  • It may be difficult to select the appropriate gear when required.
There you are that settles it, The highway code is an "Approved Code of Practice" which means in law and it is the basic standard that has to be met.
The Golf GTE coasts in D mode and has no engine braking. Are you saying that its dangerous to drive one?

Most of those points above might apply to a 60s mini but surely not relevant to any car made in the last 20 years?

Why is lack of engine braking considered dangerous?
 

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The Golf GTE coasts in D mode and has no engine braking. Are you saying that its dangerous to drive one?

Most of those points above might apply to a 60s mini but surely not relevant to any car made in the last 20 years?

Why is lack of engine braking considered dangerous?
That's not what he said.

No one is arguing about coasting in D (or B).

The HC refers to selecting N, but as you say, it's not applicable to EVs as it's a virtual neutral since there is no way physically discconnect the motor.
 
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