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I have read in previous forums comments on this. However I am about to buy a Peugeot e2008 and am being offered an 11 kW onboard charger option for additional £300. I will be getting a 7 kW charger fitted at home as the car will have plenty of time to charge there. However the times when I want faster charging will be when I am out about finding 22 kW stations and above. Can the car charge equally as well at home using 7kW as it will at street stations using 11kW 3 phase? I dont to pay for this and find I cant charge at home on 7kW and then find that 11kW is not available out and about. Would this option future proof my faster charging options from street chargers?
 

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Renault Zoe ZE50 GT-Line Rapid Charge
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Don't forget your new car can also use "rapid" DC chargers at a rate of up to 100kW where the charger can supply that much (most supply around 50kW right now).
This means that at 50kW, you can go from 10% to 80% charge in around 50mins, and at 100kW that will drop to 30mins or so.
 

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MG EZS 2020
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then find that 11kW is not available out and about
I don't think you'll find any 11 kW charges out in the wild. The faster AC chargers tend to be 22 kW and there isn't a huge amount of them around.

Doesn't the e2008 charge at 7 kW? It's fairly standard on most EV to charge at home at 7 kW. Does your dealer know what he/she is talking about. Peugeot are fairly new to the EV game.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The e2008 does charge at 7kW which is fine at home. I have a number of free 22kW chargers local to me. If I go for the 11kW 3 phase onboard charger option am I good for both?
 

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I don't think you'll find any 11 kW charges out in the wild. The faster AC chargers tend to be 22 kW and there isn't a huge amount of them around.
There's plenty if you care to look.

The local Sainsbury's had a whole bank of them.
 

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The e2008 does charge at 7kW which is fine at home. I have a number of free 22kW chargers local to me. If I go for the 11kW 3 phase onboard charger option am I good for both?
If you do go for the 11kW OBC, make sure the supplied type 2 charging cable is upgraded to 3 phase otherwise I believe you’ll only get 3.6kW from those 22kW charge points!
 

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Kia e-Niro 4 MY20
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It very much depends whether there's lots of 3phase AC chargers around for you to use. I have noticed areas where rapid chargers are scarce, but had a few installs early on are likely to have 22kW 3phase. Given most cars have a 7kW onboard charger I can see a lot of the older 3phase units being replaced by multiple single phase or CCS rapids when their time comes.

The other consideration is whether there's any significant loss in efficiency. Three phase onboard chargers are three 3.5kW units, one for each phase. So you get up to 11kW on a three phase supply. Two get switched together to give you 7kW from a single phase. It likely doesn't make much difference, but losses can be higher doing things this way.

It's only going to benefit you if there's a decent list of 3phase supplies you know you're likely to use. Otherwise I'd save the £300.
 

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MG EZS 2020
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The e2008 does charge at 7kW which is fine at home. I have a number of free 22kW chargers local to me. If I go for the 11kW 3 phase onboard charger option am I good for both?
Yes, but is it worth paying out for another 4 kW?
 

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Yes, but is it worth paying out for another 4 kW?
Probably only worth it if one had 3-phase at home and installed a 3-phase charger, which OP probably does not (most homes are single-phase).
 
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Discussion Starter #14
Just wondered why it would only be worth if I had it at home (which I can't) as the car would have plenty of time to charge there on 7kW. The benefit surely would be quicker charging whilst out and about from street chargers.
 

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Loads of 22kWh around and here they are 16p kWh vs 30p kWh for a rapid. But say for the longer journeys the faster AC charging option is a great backup as rapids are usually unreliable/blocked etc. So for £300 seems like a no brainer. Great for re-sale too :)
 

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Just wondered why it would only be worth if I had it at home (which I can't) as the car would have plenty of time to charge there on 7kW. The benefit surely would be quicker charging whilst out and about from street chargers.
Yeah, charging to 22 kWh at 7 kW would take 3 hours and at 11 kW 2 hours. That's a considerable saving, but I can't really see where it would be worth doing it. If I was 'out and about' I would be rapid charging at 50 kW plus and do it in less that half an hour. If doing a full charge you would in all likelihood doing it overnight and it doesn't really matter that much if it takes 4 hours or 7.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Good point Scrooge. Having this option fitted now may future proof my car and enhance its resale value. The Peugeot e2008 has a 200 miles range ish. I live in North Scotland where 100 mile journeys through the day are quite common. So quick charging whilst out and about is a must. Also many 22kW street chargers in this part of the country are free, making home charging less attractive!
 

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Also many 22kW street chargers in this part of the country are free, making home charging less attractive!
But you won't get 22kW - just 11, as opposed to 7. There might be the odd occasion when the marginally faster charging will make a difference in your reality, but is it £300 worth?
And they are unlikely to remain free for ever, especially with Covid knocking a massive hole in government finances. They will probably start charging for them, or more likely they just 'abandon' them - when they break they don't get fixed.
DC rapid is far more likely to be of use if you are time limited.

The value of optional extras on cars is always overestimated. When you come to sell you won't get that £300 back.
If it was £300 for 22kW ... maybe worth it.
 

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Kia e-Niro 4 MY20
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I believe I’m right in saying some models of Tesla and the Zoe, with its unusual motor windings in the charging circuit design, are about the only cars that can take high current three phase. It largely predates CCS rapids. It’s also cheap(ish) and easy to implement at the charge point.
If there’s a move to provide more destination chargers in car parks (we can dream) we’re likely to see these 32a three phase 22kw points become three single phase 7kw points, because that’s easy with then existing supply. Or the units will be upgraded to rapids.

I guess it comes down to whether you’ll have access to plenty of three phase chargers, and the charging time a third faster is beneficial. If it is, go for it,£300 isn’t that much to spend. If you don’t have the 3phase or don’t care about the extra time it’s £300 for no benefit.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
It really doesn't all come down to charging costs. Saving time on charging when on longer journeys is more beneficial than the electricity cost.
Also I still don't know that if I go for the 11kW onboard charger option if 1. Will I still be able to use my home 7kw wallcharger and 2. Just what street chargers are able to charge 11kW 3 phase. As no charge station description ever makes reference to it!! Ie would a 22kW station be able to supply 11kW 3 phase. I wouldny know as apps or the websites don't seem to mention it or make it clear!!
 
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