Speak EV - Electric Car Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
2020 Ioniq 38 2016 Leaf 30 gone
Joined
·
156 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not had any low battery warnings and yes I have the battery maintenance switched on, I’ve checked the battery voltage a few times over the last week with a Fluke meter and it hovers around 12.17 volts, this morning 12.07 volts. That to me is a battery with only 60% of its nominal voltage of around 12.6 volts, I have no way of measuring the amps btw.

The car is a 2019 manufactured Ioniq EV and I’ve read of a few issues with dead auxiliary batteries from other owners.

I monitored my back then 4-year-old Leaf’s 12-volt battery and as soon as it dropped to 12.0 volts I replaced it, I started getting weird error messages on the dashboard and the new battery resolved it.

I’ve been on a few long trips of around 2 hours motoring in the Ioniq so would think the auxiliary battery would have been charged enough.

The Hyundai dealer I bought the car from is quite a journey for me and as there are no errors showing will just say nothing wrong with the battery. The battery is a Delkor and imho tiny for a medium sized car, if it’s just a duff battery I’ll order a Yuasa replacement and be done with it, I’ve had good service from Yuasa batteries in the past.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions or advice :)
 

·
Registered
Hyundai Ioniq 28
Joined
·
7,713 Posts
Search the forum for dozens of threads on this subject. The simple, and pragmatic, solution is to buy a smart charger and attach it to the 12v DC battery for a lengthy period at least once a month whether it seems to need it or not. The programme can sometimes run for as long as twelve hours meaning that overnight is usually convenient.

Such chargers analyse the condition before instigating a specific programme of charging to rectify any problems such as sulphidation and then correctly charge in a phased way that a dumb charger will not do. Even a low power trickle charger will not perform as well to keep the 12v battery in good condition. I am pretty sure that you do not need a new battery, and it is highly likely that your earlier Leaf didn't either. They just need regular maintenance using a modern smarty.

I realise that this will be annoying. I know that it should not be necessary. Which is why I used the word 'pragmatic' at the start. Life is too short to stress over such a simple remedy that seems to be part of EV ownership for many. The issue is random, not car specific, and only affects a small number of each model. Trying to track down the cause has beaten many before now. Try to treat it as part of your monthly tyre kicking and screenwash bottle filling routine and all will be well.
 

·
Registered
2020 Ioniq 38 2016 Leaf 30 gone
Joined
·
156 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I am pretty sure that you do not need a new battery, and it is highly likely that your earlier Leaf didn't either. They just need regular maintenance using a modern smarty.
Thanks for your your response, yes I’m hopeful the battery is ok.

I bought a Ctek smart charger and ran the Leaf battery through the recondition mode twice, at first it looked promising but after a few days the weird dashboard errors started appearing again, a new battery however sorted it.

I'll let the Ctek do its stuff on the Ioniq battery (y)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
We have a 02-2019 registered Ioniq EV with the original 12V battery, no problems. I have a lithium boosterpack in the glovebox and have never needed it. You could go our route and see if you ever have problems, more common that you won't.
 

·
Registered
2020 Ioniq 38 2016 Leaf 30 gone
Joined
·
156 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
We have a 02-2019 registered Ioniq EV with the original 12V battery, no problems. I have a lithium boosterpack in the glovebox and have never needed it. You could go our route and see if you ever have problems, more common that you won't.
Thanks for your response, I bought a Lithium booster pack for the Leaf a few years back, I’ve not needed to use it other than to run it down and recharge it again a few times.

Looking into this a bit further, when you open the door to access the bonnet lever the car partially wakes up in readiness for use, so the battery is loaded down hence the lower voltage readings. And with just the bonnet open the car is again electronically active letting Bluelink know the bonnet is open.

I’ve come to the conclusion that it’s all normal :)
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top