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2019 Hyundai Kona Premium SE 64 kWh
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

My Kona has given me about 5 warnings of a low 12 volt battery when starting the car over a couple of weeks. So I thought, better not ignore it any longer and as the 40,000 mile service was due anyway booked it in. I mentioned that the 12 volt battery will most likely need replacing. However on the day, they of course did not have the battery in stock. They did offer a different battery with a higher rating, however wanted £245, which was much more than I was expecting. I thought well if it comes with 4-5 years warranty then maybe not too bad, however would only come with the same 2 year warranty same as the original. So I declined and started to shop around.

I thought the 12 volt battery replacement would be a simple job however some well known brands that I have asked so far would not take on the job, because the car is electric. Each brand giving a different reason.

1. The 12 volt battery is encoded to the car and replacing it would not work without Hyundai special tooling etc.
2. Replacing the 12 volt battery would require isolating / disconnecting the main traction battery.

I expect the real reason is more to do with high voltage and insurance, which would have made more sense to me.

Anyone else had a similar experience? Anyone managed to replace their 12 volt battery without using the dealership?

Going to try an independent garage instead of a big brand and see what they say. Otherwise I will ask the dealership to order the same cheaper battery, knowing it will fail again within 3 years, which is what I was trying the avoid. (12 volt Battery is a Rocket 45ah)
 

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Hi All,

My Kona has given me about 5 warnings of a low 12 volt battery when starting the car over a couple of weeks. So I thought, better not ignore it any longer and as the 40,000 mile service was due anyway booked it in. I mentioned that the 12 volt battery will most likely need replacing. However on the day, they of course did not have the battery in stock. They did offer a different battery with a higher rating, however wanted £245, which was much more than I was expecting. I thought well if it comes with 4-5 years warranty then maybe not too bad, however would only come with the same 2 year warranty same as the original. So I declined and started to shop around.

I thought the 12 volt battery replacement would be a simple job however some well known brands that I have asked so far would not take on the job, because the car is electric. Each brand giving a different reason.

1. The 12 volt battery is encoded to the car and replacing it would not work without Hyundai special tooling etc.
2. Replacing the 12 volt battery would require isolating / disconnecting the main traction battery.

I expect the real reason is more to do with high voltage and insurance, which would have made more sense to me.

Anyone else had a similar experience? Anyone managed to replace their 12 volt battery without using the dealership?

Going to try an independent garage instead of a big brand and see what they say. Otherwise I will ask the dealership to order the same cheaper battery, knowing it will fail again within 3 years, which is what I was trying the avoid. (12 volt Battery is a Rocket 45ah)
Sounds like nonsense.

Why don't you fit a replacrment battery yourself?

For about £100.
 

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2020 Hyundai Kona Premium SE 64kWh, Ceramic Blue
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167 Posts
Have you tried the AA or RAC, I think both will be happy to sell and fit a new battery.
 

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Hyundai Kona Style 64kwh
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40 Posts
The 12v battery is a standard user serviceable part.
It can be swapped out in exactly the same way it can for a combustion engine car. My battery was replaced in 5 minutes flat (no pun intended) by the AA guy. It was replaced with a Bosch equivalent which comes with a five year warranty and the dealership where I bought the car paid for it too. If you get your car serviced at a Hyundai dealer you should be covered by AA rescue too. So maybe get them to swap it out? They will charge you £150 but at least that’s better than the £250 you’ve been quoted? Hope this helps.
 

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2019 Hyundai Kona Premium SE 64 kWh
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7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Freddym - Honest answer? Never done it before and having two well known brands tell me these stories started to seed doubt. I was sure what I was being told at the time was wrong, however the doubt got bigger, as I thought they are turning away easy business.

IanMurray - I have not tried either of them, thank you for the suggestion.

PRGDenia - This is what I thought too, before I started getting quotes. Hyundai did quote me £150 for the like for like replacement, but would need to order the battery first. I would much rather pay the same for a battery with a five year warranty.
 

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2020 Ioniq 38 2016 Leaf 30 gone
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201 Posts
I replaced the failing 12V battery in my Leaf with no problems, I’ve also removed the 12V battery on my Ioniq twice now to do recovery maintenance charges with a Ctek charger. again, with no issues when it was re-connected.
 

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Kona 64
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Complete and utter tosh.

Its a bog standard 12V lead acid battery (which is why it fails) and the price quoted by Hyundai is silly money. I fitted a battery myself last month for £80, could have paid less but battery had totally failed and I wanted to use car that day. Rang up local battery supply company 3 miles away and offered choice of batteries. Went for one with 3 year warranty. Went out in wife’s car, bought it, fitted it in 10 minutes. Its such a straightforward job. I then had error code on dash, rang Hyundai breakdown (AA) who came out and reset code. He said I should have bought a better AGM battery which would last longer, but a 3 year warranty is more than adequate for my ownership.
So from trying to go out in morning, to getting new battery, fitting it and AA coming 2 hours. I can commend the AA guy who was brilliant. He has seen plenty of battery failures and dealt with the error code in only 10 minutes or so.

Stupid people giving you duff info or just a rip off.
The new battery is working perfectly and I have now fitted a BM2 monitoring unit which proves it. Fitting the new battery was easier than replacing a brake light on my wifes Fiesta
Slope Rectangle Font Parallel Pattern
 

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Complete and utter tosh.

Its a bog standard 12V lead acid battery (which is why it fails) and the price quoted by Hyundai is silly money. I fitted a battery myself last month for £80, could have paid less but battery had totally failed and I wanted to use car that day. Rang up local battery supply company 3 miles away and offered choice of batteries. Went for one with 3 year warranty. Went out in wife’s car, bought it, fitted it in 10 minutes. Its such a straightforward job. I then had error code on dash, rang Hyundai breakdown (AA) who came out and reset code. He said I should have bought a better AGM battery which would last longer, but a 3 year warranty is more than adequate for my ownership.
So from trying to go out in morning, to getting new battery, fitting it and AA coming 2 hours. I can commend the AA guy who was brilliant. He has seen plenty of battery failures and dealt with the error code in only 10 minutes or so.

Stupid people giving you duff info or just a rip off.
The new battery is working perfectly and I have now fitted a BM2 monitoring unit which proves it. Fitting the new battery was easier than replacing a brake light on my wifes Fiesta View attachment 161884
For these cars. Really no excuse not to DIY unless one is physically infirm and unable to lift the estimated 8kg.
 

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For these cars. Really no excuse not to DIY unless one is physically infirm and unable to lift the estimated 8kg.
Me and DIY just don’t go together these days @freddym! I can do the basics, but as soon as something goes wrong I am stuffed and don’t know how to fix it.

When I look back at what I did when I was younger, I can’t believe I did it: I wouldn’t attempt them now!

This applies to all DIY, by the way!!
 

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Mercedes EQC 400 4matic
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Interesting conversation. The EQC has the standard Mercedes’ connections for being able to attach a charger to the 12v battery (which I had to do during our confinement here with my e class) BUT in the manual it says that starting assistance or charging should be carried out by a qualified service centre. It is also quite specific that the 12v battery should also be changed by a service centre. I frankly would not consider doing anything else these days for a replacement despite having lots of experience of charging and replacing car batteries in the past but the way they maybe integrated into the cars computer system is something that the home mechanic may not have the ability to sort out As does seem to be the case from a posting above. I always want a like for like replacement of any parts too thst being more important to me as I am in the position of generally not having to secure the lowest price (indeed for me whenever I do that the old adage buy cheap pay twice always seems to apply!).
 

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Me and DIY just don’t go together these days @freddym! I can do the basics, but as soon as something goes wrong I am stuffed and don’t know how to fix it.

When I look back at what I did when I was younger, I can’t believe I did it: I wouldn’t attempt them now!

This applies to all DIY, by the way!!
Of course!

Hope you get it fixed soon. Doesn't look too expensive. Might even be a job I would give to Halfords ( eek).
 

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Mercedes EQC 400 4matic
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Just been doing some research into the whole 12v battery in electric cars thing and was amazed to find the exact replacement for the one fitted to my car is only a 12ah 170v model and would cost 129.99 euro from Mercedes. The e class had a huge battery I think around 120ah so this one is tiny in comparison. Made by the Italian company FIARM designed for high cyclic use so clearly something designed into a new type of environment. I think Mercedes’ advice re charge etc will be based on potential damage to sensors or electric circuits caused by failure of poor user kit ie my Lidl charger😆or making a mistake in connection etc so a safety approach not a specific it cannot be done one. My 12v battery seems to stay in a much better condition than the e class which regularly read as partially discharged due to my inappropriate use of a diesel car for short journeys🙄
 

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Hi All,

My Kona has given me about 5 warnings of a low 12 volt battery when starting the car over a couple of weeks. So I thought, better not ignore it any longer and as the 40,000 mile service was due anyway booked it in. I mentioned that the 12 volt battery will most likely need replacing. However on the day, they of course did not have the battery in stock. They did offer a different battery with a higher rating, however wanted £245, which was much more than I was expecting. I thought well if it comes with 4-5 years warranty then maybe not too bad, however would only come with the same 2 year warranty same as the original. So I declined and started to shop around.

I thought the 12 volt battery replacement would be a simple job however some well known brands that I have asked so far would not take on the job, because the car is electric. Each brand giving a different reason.

1. The 12 volt battery is encoded to the car and replacing it would not work without Hyundai special tooling etc.
2. Replacing the 12 volt battery would require isolating / disconnecting the main traction battery.

I expect the real reason is more to do with high voltage and insurance, which would have made more sense to me.

Anyone else had a similar experience? Anyone managed to replace their 12 volt battery without using the dealership?

Going to try an independent garage instead of a big brand and see what they say. Otherwise I will ask the dealership to order the same cheaper battery, knowing it will fail again within 3 years, which is what I was trying the avoid. (12 volt Battery is a Rocket 45ah)
Find a decent Hyundai dealer, get it replaced under guarantee- that smells like a lot of BS to me!
For reference, my Tesla 12V needed replacing, it is unique to Tesla, would have charged £180 for a ranger to visit me and do it at my place of choosing. Our Hyundai dealer is usually great with our Ioniq too.
 

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Just been doing some research into the whole 12v battery in electric cars thing and was amazed to find the exact replacement for the one fitted to my car is only a 12ah 170v model and would cost 129.99 euro from Mercedes. The e class had a huge battery I think around 120ah so this one is tiny in comparison. Made by the Italian company FIARM designed for high cyclic use so clearly something designed into a new type of environment. I think Mercedes’ advice re charge etc will be based on potential damage to sensors or electric circuits caused by failure of poor user kit ie my Lidl charger😆or making a mistake in connection etc so a safety approach not a specific it cannot be done one. My 12v battery seems to stay in a much better condition than the e class which regularly read as partially discharged due to my inappropriate use of a diesel car for short journeys🙄
Apart from your incorrect voltage and Ah values, you may well be right.
 

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That Mercedes link to a battery details a 12 volt output; 12 AmpHours capacity ( so it would provide 12 amps output for 1 hour OR 1 amp for 12 Hours before going totally flat - theoretically at least ; 170 Amps will be the maximum current that can be drawn from the battery. In ICE terms it was called CCA (Cold Cranking Amps) but as there is no engine to crank over in an EV I guess they have changed the terminology.
To give a comparison to an ICE Battery, even a small engined car would have a 12 volt, 75AmpHour, 300Amp CCA.
That sizeis just not needed for an EV.
 

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That Mercedes link to a battery details a 12 volt output; 12 AmpHours capacity ( so it would provide 12 amps output for 1 hour OR 1 amp for 12 Hours before going totally flat - theoretically at least ; 170 Amps will be the maximum current that can be drawn from the battery. In ICE terms it was called CCA (Cold Cranking Amps) but as there is no engine to crank over in an EV I guess they have changed the terminology.
To give a comparison to an ICE Battery, even a small engined car would have a 12 volt, 75AmpHour, 300Amp CCA.
That sizeis just not needed for an EV.
Storage capacity for modern BEV 12v battery needs to be surprisingly high because ordinary lead acid doesnt like cyclic service at significant depth of discharge and because battery is drained by connected services, keyless entry, accidental lights on incidents.
 
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