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Okay so just been out doing some further testing with multiple meters this time. Testing directly across the battery posts gave a constant 12.6v which looks much more healthy although still doesn't entirely explain why my maintenance charger wants to top it up for three hours and more. I'm going to let it run for a longer period when I get chance and see what happens.

There is something interfering with the voltage reading on the line to the vanity light unit for a period of time when the car is switched off and I'm guessing it's the main interior light fitting. Letting it settle for a few minutes after switching off so the dome light goes out, gives the same constant 12.6v reading as the battery posts.

When the car is on, no matter what's running, I get a constant 14.6/14.7v readout suggesting the aux battery is always charging. So why would it ever deep cycle or go flat? Even with utility mode, the battery saver is presumably designed to keep the 12v charged for a certain time. I am guessing if there are duff batteries out there it's because they've been sat around discharged for ages rather than going flat in normal usage.

The other aspect which may impact them of course is heat or lack of it to be more precise. In most ICEs the 12v is under the bonnet with a nice hot engine, In an EV, there isn't much heat to warm a 12v battery when it's -10 overnight. But equally there is no requirement to dump 70 amps into a starter motor so that shouldn't be much of an issue.

Much happier having a voltmeter on the dash though now (y)
Maintenance chargers need to run overnight minimum. They condition in many modes and take many hours. When they finish the voltage is usually 14V plus.
 

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Discussion Starter #42
Anyone recommend a good Li-Ion jump starter pack to keep in the car (I'm hedging my beta here)?

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Amazon is a good place to start.
Halfords do offer some units that would suit the job.
I know one member who bought a unit from them ?.
He maybe along shortly to give his opinion.
I purchased the “Halo Bolt Air”.
As the name suggests, it’s a booster pack and an inflation pump in the same unit.
A bit over the top, but I intend to purchase a space saver wheel & tyre combo from the HS and then remove the foam tray that currently houses the bits and pieces for emergency tyre inflation kit.
No point in ringing the rescue service for help with a puncture unless you have a spare wheel for them to install.
I doubt they will even come !.
 

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why does an EV deep cycle it’s 12v any more than an ICE?
I was specifically referring to Tesla exclusively using deep cycle 12V batteries. Their cars have a lot of 12V consumption while the car is off in order to support the various remote app features, sentry mode, dog mode, etc. Most other cars don't drain 12V battery nearly as deep while powered off. I was just curious what type of battery KIA ships with the Niro as mine was replaced before I could check. Can't speak to other countries but here in the USA, the Niro/Kona have an LTE modem and computer that's constantly running reporting telemetry data and allowing remote app access. On my other EV, the BMS also monitors the high-voltage battery and triggers the car to turn on and run AC if it detects battery temperature getting too high while parked - maybe Niro/Kona do same.

My last ICE was very old so not sure how the 12V drain compares to modern ICE cars.

When the car is on, no matter what's running, I get a constant 14.6/14.7v readout suggesting the aux battery is always charging.
That's not the case on my Niro. But I don't have the stock battery so maybe some difference there. On my Niro, the charging level drops instantly from 14.6 to 13.x as soon as the external lights are turned on and goes back to 14.6 as soon as I turn them off. That's why I mentioned that if you mostly do nighttime driving, a discharged 12V battery would not be able to recover much charge while driving. It would need to fully recover during main battery charging sessions which may be too short for some people who make many frequent short trips and leave car parked for long periods. An OBD2 reader can show you the SOC % of the 12V battery. I found that mine would slowly drain over the course of a typical work week until I slowed down my daily charging sessions using either the portable EVSE (granny cable) or lowering maximum AC charging current using the car menus.
 

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Found some photos online showing the 12V OEM battery that came with the 2019 Niro EV here in USA. It's the Rocket CMF45L-DIN (some specs here). It's the same battery they use on many of their other ICE vehicles. After my 12V battery died, the dealer replaced it with a KIA branded "37110 T4000U" model (specs here suggest it's for PHEV or EV use) Both are regular flooded lead acid batteries instead of the more expensive AGM type used by the some other EVs (Tesla and Chevrolet for example). The AGM type 12V batteries allow for deeper discharge and faster recharge.

This past weekend my car was parked unused for 48 hours while the 12V battery drained from 89% SOC to 81% SOC. Voltage was still at 12.1V.

You would experience 12V battery drain on an ICE vehicle as well if left unattended but there's nothing that can be done about that. An ICE can't turn engine on automatically to run the alternator as that would fill your garage with exhaust fumes. On an EV, there's no excuse for allowing the 12V battery to completely discharge like we've seen on some Niros and Konas while the high voltage battery is still reasonably charged and/or the car is still plugged in.
 

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Found some photos online showing the 12V OEM battery that came with the 2019 Niro EV here in USA. It's the Rocket CMF45L-DIN (some specs here). It's the same battery they use on many of their other ICE vehicles. After my 12V battery died, the dealer replaced it with a KIA branded "37110 T4000U" model (specs here suggest it's for PHEV or EV use) Both are regular flooded lead acid batteries instead of the more expensive AGM type used by the some other EVs (Tesla and Chevrolet for example). The AGM type 12V batteries allow for deeper discharge and faster recharge.

This past weekend my car was parked unused for 48 hours while the 12V battery drained from 89% SOC to 81% SOC. Voltage was still at 12.1V.

You would experience 12V battery drain on an ICE vehicle as well if left unattended but there's nothing that can be done about that. An ICE can't turn engine on automatically to run the alternator as that would fill your garage with exhaust fumes. On an EV, there's no excuse for allowing the 12V battery to completely discharge like we've seen on some Niros and Konas while the high voltage battery is still reasonably charged and/or the car is still plugged in.
I think Tesla has said they are doing away all together with the need for a 12 volt lead acid battery on there future cars !.
I have no idea how this going to work, but the weight saving alone will be fantastic improvement.
 

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After putting my 12v on a mains charger for a good few hours on two occasions, I’m now seeing the charge from the inverter down at 13v regularly rather than the 14.7 it was hitting. Not sure but it looks like it’s brought the 12v to a much healthier full charge situation.
 

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Lots of interesting investigation going on with the Kona 12V battery charging behavior. I suspect it's exactly the same on the Niro so might be useful to read. Check out this page and the forum links.
 

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Not scientifically monitored by any means but I still think I am seeing different behaviour on my car since I had it on a maintenance charger for many hours.

When I first wired the voltmeter in, it seemed to be constantly 14.7 ish. Now it’s moving around a bit more. Today during steady driving in the sunshine with little load, it seemed to be happily sitting around 12.8v.

I just wondered if the time it spent sat on a ship may have affected it but would have thought that 3,000 miles of driving would have rectified that by now. No idea how the inverter is monitoring the 12v or indeed what it is capable of doing to it.
 

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Has anyone else experienced a flat 12v battery in their eNiro?

On Friday last week I came out to a dead car. I removed the 12v and recharged with a smart charger, replaced the battery and made a few short journeys on Saturday, Sunday and Monday.

This morning, dead again.

Are there any known issues, recommend diagnostics etc?

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The most likely cause is a duff lead acid battery, from new. By no means unknown - had no end of trouble with a new (Korean) battery in my old V70. Get it tested. It would have to be a helluva drain for the high-voltage battery not to be able to keep up!
 

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Found some photos online showing the 12V OEM battery that came with the 2019 Niro EV here in USA. It's the Rocket CMF45L-DIN (some specs here). It's the same battery they use on many of their other ICE vehicles. After my 12V battery died, the dealer replaced it with a KIA branded "37110 T4000U" model (specs here suggest it's for PHEV or EV use) Both are regular flooded lead acid batteries instead of the more expensive AGM type used by the some other EVs (Tesla and Chevrolet for example). The AGM type 12V batteries allow for deeper discharge and faster recharge.

This past weekend my car was parked unused for 48 hours while the 12V battery drained from 89% SOC to 81% SOC. Voltage was still at 12.1V.

You would experience 12V battery drain on an ICE vehicle as well if left unattended but there's nothing that can be done about that. An ICE can't turn engine on automatically to run the alternator as that would fill your garage with exhaust fumes. On an EV, there's no excuse for allowing the 12V battery to completely discharge like we've seen on some Niros and Konas while the high voltage battery is still reasonably charged and/or the car is still plugged in.
This is the battery in my UK version 1 EV Niro delivered on 1/Feb/20.
Voltage 12.84 before any charging after taken delivery from dealer.
Left battery saver on and car seems to charge the 12v battery back up to 12.8 when it falls to 15v.
 

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Found some photos online showing the 12V OEM battery that came with the 2019 Niro EV here in USA. It's the Rocket CMF45L-DIN (some specs here). It's the same battery they use on many of their other ICE vehicles. After my 12V battery died, the dealer replaced it with a KIA branded "37110 T4000U" model (specs here suggest it's for PHEV or EV use) Both are regular flooded lead acid batteries instead of the more expensive AGM type used by the some other EVs (Tesla and Chevrolet for example). The AGM type 12V batteries allow for deeper discharge and faster recharge.

This past weekend my car was parked unused for 48 hours while the 12V battery drained from 89% SOC to 81% SOC. Voltage was still at 12.1V.

You would experience 12V battery drain on an ICE vehicle as well if left unattended but there's nothing that can be done about that. An ICE can't turn engine on automatically to run the alternator as that would fill your garage with exhaust fumes. On an EV, there's no excuse for allowing the 12V battery to completely discharge like we've seen on some Niros and Konas while the high voltage battery is still reasonably charged and/or the car is still plugged in.
This is the battery in my UK version 1 EV Niro delivered on 1/Feb/20.
Voltage 12.84 before any charging after taken delivery from dealer.
Left battery saver on and car seems to charge the 12v battery back up to 12.8 when it falls to 15v.
 

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Anyone did some measuring the soc of the 12V battery?
It seems the charger in the Niro is very slow.
I noticed it increased only 1% from 70 to 71% soc after 1 hour charging.
When i use an external charger it goes a lot faster.
 

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Following this. Kia Soul EV use here, just had my 12v battery replaced under warranty after 1.5 years. We all have crap batteries too from what I've read on Souls.
 

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Just had this problem with my 10 month old E-Niro. I have OVMS on it, which may be draining the battery a little but looking at the 12v charge record on OVMS it seems that at 3.15 this morning the charge level dropped suddenly from 11.5v to 2.7v can't imagine what happened to cause that?

..only difference to any other day was gale force winds and torrential rain?
 

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Not scientifically monitored by any means but I still think I am seeing different behaviour on my car since I had it on a maintenance charger for many hours.

When I first wired the voltmeter in, it seemed to be constantly 14.7 ish. Now it’s moving around a bit more. Today during steady driving in the sunshine with little load, it seemed to be happily sitting around 12.8v.

I just wondered if the time it spent sat on a ship may have affected it but would have thought that 3,000 miles of driving would have rectified that by now. No idea how the inverter is monitoring the 12v or indeed what it is capable of doing to it.
I have a September 18 Kona. With no warning the 12v battery died December 19. Up till then I took note of the issues and hoped it would not happen to me.Since then belt and braces. An emergency charging pack - used about 10 times before new battery fitted. Now have a 1amp maintenance charger and a plug in voltmeter .

From new the replacement battery consistently overcharged at 14.8v. As with your experience, after slow charging the charging rate has become more normal. Turn on ignition and see voltage go up to 14.8v then backing off. Would that have happened if I had not bought the conditioning charger? No idea but It does feel like the conditioning charge is the way forward. Certainly till the manufacturers of EV’s work it out.

My original and replacement batteries are cold cranking batteries for ICE cars. The original battery had the CCA rating on the side, have Hyundai and Kia not noticed that there is no lump of an engine to turn over? EV cars with expensive HV battery let down by a lead acid battery invented in the 1850’s
 

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I don't understand why it seems so many batteries are failing so quickly. My last car was a 2010 Citroen C3 Picasso. It still had it's original battery working perfectly when I sold it two weeks ago.
 

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I don't understand why it seems so many batteries are failing so quickly. My last car was a 2010 Citroen C3 Picasso. It still had it's original battery working perfectly when I sold it two weeks ago.
There are a few different factors at play.

1. The battery isn’t used in the same way (no regular impact from the ICE startup)
2. The charging is not via an alternator / voltage regulator combination
3. There is no heat source under the bonnet as there is with many ICEs although many batteries are in the boot of ICEs these days anyway

‘Who knows which maybe impacting but as you say, it does seem rather odd. My 4x4 is 14 years old and sits in the garage for months on end with no apparent issues at all.
 
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