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Anyone using a 12V tyre pump with their Zoë? I think correct tyre pressure will be important for maintaining efficiency and with that in mind want a pump I can use while my car is hooked up to the mains in my garage.

So...

Firstly, will the 12V socket provide power while hooked to mains?

Secondly, anyone ever used this...Roypow I50 12V tyre inflators?

(I'm still awaiting delivery of my Zoë)
 

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Save your money, there;s a 12v pump supplied with Zoe, though you can get a sealant that does not make your tyre unusable after using the supplied sealant here...RAC Tyre sealant
This one can be washed out of the tyre after use, whereas the supplied sealant makes the tyre unusable.
12V socket is live while charging.
 

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Hi ,
My experience with electric pumps has been pretty painful. They don't always seem to have a good seal or give an accurate reading, which is important on my bike. I use a footpump and a manual guage. If you're only adding a lb or 2 then a footpump is no problem. If its more than that you need to check for nails etc, and get the tyre seal checked. Car tyres generally seem to maintain a regular pressure although checking once a week is advisable. Depends on mileage and driving style. I had a mains transformer which I could plug the electric pump into (from a car shop) before I gave up on them.
(I don't worry much about the Zoe pressures as my car spends most of its time in the dealer's workshop at the moment!)
 

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Zoe Devotee
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Buy a small compressor, you get small case ones in Lidl now and then for £40. Can be used for all manner of things and fine for putting air in your tyres, don't trust the attached analogue guage. But a decent quality digital gauge and then set pressure with that.
 

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Zoe Q210 Dynamique Intens, Kia Niro PHEV
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To be brutally honest if you have a new car with TPMS (tyre pressure monitoring), then for a car they are generally good enough, agreed John a motorbike is more critical. If you get a dash warning then as Sandy says use a decent digital battery gauge to confirm which (if any) tyre is low then use the pump in the boot to put air in (as an analogue gauge over inflate and use digital battery gauge to set accurately on deflation). Then reset on dash.

Based on efficiency savings it will take many years to recoup the cost of a £40.00 pump in the cost savings on electricity costs.

However to answer your first point, personally I would not use a high drain device like a 12v pump while the car is on charge, I would only ever do it when the car is disconnected. The car is sensitive enough without trying to confuse it!!!
 

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Sorry to butt in to a car specific forum for not my car, but I saw the title go past...

I have had very poor experiences with the generic 12V compressors in years gone by (Halfords, Argos etc.) but the one that came with my PHEV is the dogs :) It's "Made In Japan", no brand on it apart from the Mitsubishi OEM labels and usage guide, but I doubt they make it. It is very very good the few times I have had to use it and compact with a space for the cable and rubber hose in the box.
 

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Zoe Devotee
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To be brutally honest if you have a new car with TPMS (tyre pressure monitoring), then for a car they are generally good enough, agreed John a motorbike is more critical. If you get a dash warning then as Sandy says use a decent digital battery gauge to confirm which (if any) tyre is low then use the pump in the boot to put air in (as an analogue gauge over inflate and use digital battery gauge to set accurately on deflation). Then reset on dash.

Based on efficiency savings it will take many years to recoup the cost of a £40.00 pump in the cost savings on electricity costs.

However to answer your first point, personally I would not use a high drain device like a 12v pump while the car is on charge, I would only ever do it when the car is disconnected. The car is sensitive enough without trying to confuse it!!!
Sorry to butt in to a car specific forum for not my car, but I saw the title go past...

I have had very poor experiences with the generic 12V compressors in years gone by (Halfords, Argos etc.) but the one that came with my PHEV is the dogs :) It's "Made In Japan", no brand on it apart from the Mitsubishi OEM labels and usage guide, but I doubt they make it. It is very very good the few times I have had to use it and compact with a space for the cable and rubber hose in the box.
Prefer my 240v suitcase compressor, cost £40 and I can use it for blowing out gunge on pipes etc, pumping up all an sundry in double quick time, painting fences etc, oh and it doesn't sound like its going to rattle to pieces after 5mins of use like a 12v one does. :)
 

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Corsa-e Elite Nav 70 reg
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I've just had a go with the supplied pump, and I'm quite impressed. It's a bit slow, but does the job well.
 

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I've never seen any figures for the accuracy of pressure gauges and I suspect there will be quite a bit of variation between them. Digital instruments often lull us into thinking they are more accurate than they really are as they have so many digits.

I've got a Halfrauds tyre pump with a built in gauge. It works ok from the 12 V socket, it makes a lot of noise and is quite slow but gets there in the end and the pressure gauge roughly agrees with another gauge that I have. I can't say much more.

I would not recommend pumping up small tyres like bike tyres with a high power compressor, it's easy to over inflate them and the results can be an exploded tyre.
 

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Zoe Devotee
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A digital gauge will at least be consistent across all 4 tyres. I tend to use my compressor (or occasionally a petrol station one) but confirm with my digital gauge and go with a best guess from there.
 
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