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Discussion Starter #1
I dont feel ready to leave my 13a charger at home, but obviously its a faff plugging in and securing all the time

So was happy when I saw one going localIy - but its got one of those round Caravan type 16A plugs on and is 16 amp

the guy selling it says I can use an adaptor and plug into the normal 3 pin ?

Would that be able to work? Can I get some one to attach it to the plug socket permanently? I could do it inside the garage so only the type one connector is outside and then dont have to worry about it going missing?
 

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if you buy a 16A charger, why not just have the proper 16A socket fitted for it? Then you can draw the full 16A and dont have a risk of overheating the 13a plug/socket.

You can adapt down to a 13A plug, but you will need to ensure the charger itself can be limited to draw no more than 13A (or ideally 10A).
 

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If it's a unit capable of drawing 16A you would not want to use an adapter - as it would overheat the normal 13A plug, and possibly wiring leading to the socket it's plugged into if not protected properly.

You could look at getting something like THIS which would be safer, should not require much retrofitting.
 

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Its only worth buying if it allows you to knock the amperage down to 10amp. as others have said it would fry the socket after a while trying to draw that much power.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You could look at getting something like THIS which would be safer, should not require much retrofitting.

Would this replace the plug socket in the garage? just sold house we are moving to a rented place whilst we decide whether to stay in the UK ( waiting for VISA approval )

So wouldnt be able to do major surgery, Can see a single thick grey wire going to the normal plug
 

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Yeah it would need its own plug and cabling maybe. Its not worth the hassle.

how much is it going for and can you change the AMP's it draws?
 

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You'd need a pic from the back to get the model number and such but if those are buttons on the front i'd say its variable.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Cool looks like its variable! Has any one else used one?

To be honest I just want to have one in the car and one I dont have to muck around with plugs on way to work and back

I've only used it when visiting family away from home charging for an hour...

Which one to leave at home tho now?




135220
 

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In north America we have “15 amp” duplex receptacles that are rated @ 20 amperes and are “always” fused (circuit breaker) @ 20 amps. We also have “15/20 amp” duplex receptacles that will accept both 15 and 20 amp plugs. Dedicated 30 amp single outlet receptacles for 110-125 volt appliances such as window air conditioners and refrigerators are available.
A 30 amp RV (caravan) 115-125 volt receptacle is available, is seen only in RV parks unless an RV owner has had one installed at home.
Our HORRIBLE 115-125 15 and 15/20 amp receptacles now have shutters that require both prongs of the plug to be inserted straight and squarely in. Sticking a small flat screwdriver in (one) slot won’t unlock the receptacle. Newer receptacles have the contacts recessed far enough in the slots that plug prongs don’t become “live” or “hot” until the plug is inserted most of the way in. Most appliance plugs have a flange that prevents fingers accidentally slipping onto the prongs and getting a nasty 110-125 volt shock.
Except for very old shacks that have antique 110-125 volt 40 or 60 amp service, all USA residential service is 240 volt two- or split-phase. Each side of the circuit is 110-127 volts to neutral/ground, making 220-254 volts across the two “hot” wires.
If a facility has 440 volts 3 phase supply, between one “hot” wire and neutral/ground is ~120 volts however the voltage between any two “hot” wires is ~208 volts which is why almost all “220 volt” appliances are rated “208-240 volts.”
North America is 60 Hz, which was found by Edison (DC promoter) to be the most deadly as it causes the heart to fibrillate - stop beating and just quiver. The 50 Hz used in much of the world is slightly less dangerous.
I have my home charger plugged into a timer that is set to switch “ON” between 9p and 5a, when the power company provides a 1¢/kWh rate to EV and PHEV owners. The afternoon rate is 20¢/kWh and the morning and evening rate is 14¢/kWh so it's a real price break for EV/PHEV owners to charge at home. Even using only the 12 amp controller that came with the Leaf, I am able to do all of my charging either at 1¢/kWh or at free charging at Nissan dealers and city charging stations. That helps make up for the $212 annual alternative fuel vehicle registration tax and the $80 number plate tax charged by Georgia.
 
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