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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Agree with the Instavolt suggestion. I rely on them when I go to the Lakes.

To be honest:,

a. The options for other operators are limited up there. The Lakes area is not over blessed with rapid options.

b. Lakes, or anywhere else for that matter, Instavolt should be on your list of go to chargers. They are one of the best operators for reliability, are easy to use and take contactless payment.

The ones in the Lakes at Booths do tend to be the older 50kw units, so you're going to be waiting a little while. Fortunately, Booths have a nice cafe in them.

Bear in mind as well though that, because options are limited, and Instavolt are known to be reliable, you won't be the only one seeking them out as option no.1. Therefore, they can often be busy.
Thanks for the heads up. All useful stuff and expectation setting for us. The mindset needs reprograming some to say the least. Really looking forward to this.
 

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Kia Niro EV '4' 2022
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I was all enthusiastic about planning for all charging eventualities when I got my first EV 2.5 years ago. Applied for every card I could and downloaded and registered on every app. I got so many cards I bought a separate little wallet thing to keep them in which lives in the car.

I have NEVER used one of them. I decided very quickly that contactless payment was the only option I am interested in and would actively avoid an operator that didn't offer that payment option (looking at you Geniepoint). With a modicum of planning, it is straightforward to make sure you stick to the good networks and this vastly increases the odds of you not being one of those people who finds the charging experience to be poor.
 

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2021 Lexus UX300e
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Instavolt, Osprey good. On my summer road trip up that way, Pod Point at tesco were very useful and not just because they were cheap. They also have much bigger charging bays than the ones at Booths, which are very tight
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I was all enthusiastic about planning for all charging eventualities when I got my first EV 2.5 years ago. Applied for every card I could and downloaded and registered on every app. I got so many cards I bought a separate little wallet thing to keep them in which lives in the car.

I have NEVER used one of them. I decided very quickly that contactless payment was the only option I am interested in and would actively avoid an operator that didn't offer that payment option (looking at you Geniepoint). With a modicum of planning, it is straightforward to make sure you stick to the good networks and this vastly increases the odds of you not being one of those people who finds the charging experience to be poor.
Yes guilty as charged on that one DSL ... I'm tending towards the same fat wallet of cards.

I like the plug & charge facility that comes on the car. I've set it up but of course set up and actually being familiar are different things.

But for sure I think that's solid advice. I'm hoping to be one of those that comes back saying how easy it all is :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Instavolt, Osprey good. On my summer road trip up that way, Pod Point at tesco were very useful and not just because they were cheap. They also have much bigger charging bays than the ones at Booths, which are very tight
Instavolt definitely seems be coming up regularly EdH. Is going to be interesting this. At last I will have something to share not just be planning for :)
 

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VW ID.3 Family Pro Performance (Jan 22)
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Morning all,

OK a bit pathetic I know, but I pick up my car tomorrow morning after best part of 2 years of trauma. A story in itself.

Anyway that aside, it's showroom and keys time! I've done a fair bit of homework but all the same it's for real now and some advice on the first route and your experience on charging would be interesting.

I have a very decent panel on the car that advises charging places and I believe also if they are working or not. I have the Zap map, Electromap and Plug Share apps on phone but all new. The car has more than decent range in reality but I want to learn the charging routines and locations. Charge point is on drivers side rear and it's a long old unit.

After collection we are driving up to the Lake District for a couple of days from Shropshire. I've travelled a lot but never been there before, can you believe? Stopping in Coniston and the hotel does have a Project EV charger although they know little more than that about charge rates etc.

So part of the fun of this new world is of course learning the new tools, locations and techniques, and I'm more than prepared to invest the time in that.

But just from your own experiences, what charge points would you recommend (or suggest avoid) for the haul up there and the day after when we will do the big lakes loop. I've pasted the 2nd day map below. And the drive up I guess will be getting on M6 at maybe J14 or J12. Just looking make the first outing a relaxed, fun lightweight one before starting to get this thing to stretch it's legs on some more challenging long hauls.

New car, new fuel, new place to drive round all in one day :) Many thanks in advance.

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Agree with suggestions so far of Instavolt at Booths while you are up there, and Ionity, MFG on M6 (although the J27 MFG site Costa has closed so it's just a garage and shop now). I would add two other sites: (1) Burton in Kendal services has a good Gridserve hub, although it's only northbound and in practice you won't need it, (2) if you find yourself in western lakes, there is a new dual ultra rapid site near Cockermouth that is run by EG group. It's on zapmap (under 'other'). They take contactless.
Booths supermarkets are nice and usually have a cafe too. The chargers do get quite busy though and the chargers are only 50kw so recommend planning to stop for a while and chill out or do some shopping rather than arrive expecting to get going again quickly.
 

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I'm not crazy, the attack has begun.
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Morning all,

OK a bit pathetic I know, but I pick up my car tomorrow morning after best part of 2 years of trauma. A story in itself.

Anyway that aside, it's showroom and keys time! I've done a fair bit of homework but all the same it's for real now and some advice on the first route and your experience on charging would be interesting.

I have a very decent panel on the car that advises charging places and I believe also if they are working or not. I have the Zap map, Electromap and Plug Share apps on phone but all new. The car has more than decent range in reality but I want to learn the charging routines and locations. Charge point is on drivers side rear and it's a long old unit.

After collection we are driving up to the Lake District for a couple of days from Shropshire. I've travelled a lot but never been there before, can you believe? Stopping in Coniston and the hotel does have a Project EV charger although they know little more than that about charge rates etc.

So part of the fun of this new world is of course learning the new tools, locations and techniques, and I'm more than prepared to invest the time in that.

But just from your own experiences, what charge points would you recommend (or suggest avoid) for the haul up there and the day after when we will do the big lakes loop. I've pasted the 2nd day map below. And the drive up I guess will be getting on M6 at maybe J14 or J12. Just looking make the first outing a relaxed, fun lightweight one before starting to get this thing to stretch it's legs on some more challenging long hauls.

New car, new fuel, new place to drive round all in one day :) Many thanks in advance.

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View attachment 169267
I'll offer you one key recommendation.

I can't comment on who provides the best service these days because I have not been charging myself. What I found over the course of 7 years of charging was that companies enter the market with a fanfare, deliver great service for a while, get a bit tired of it and start losing the plot, and service quality.

Instavolt was 'the' charging company when I basically stopped public charging. Whether they have gone the same way as EH, CM, etc, before them, I cannot say.

But what I would strongly present to you is 'the best' strategy for charging your car, which is to charge early. As soon as you are able to charge so that you are sure to make it all the way home, then charge. Don't wait until you are low.

So, if you are half way on your trip somewhere and it's 150 miles to go, and you're sure that you can do 150 miles on 80% *, then charge to 80% as soon as you are able, even if you have 50% remaining.

Reasoning;
a) it doesn't matter if you stop later or earlier, if you have to stop to charge once anyway,
b) you are minimising the electricity cost away to that at your domestic rate,
c) anything can go wrong with finding a next charger, it is so much more relaxing for the rest of your trip that you can then ignore your SOC
d) if something 'does' go wrong with the charge points, you have the maximum opportunity to go find more, rather than the bare minimum.

* [I say '80%' not so much to fit in with the expectations of the zealots but simply that you are optimising battery charge times and also battery life. But if one needs to charge to 100% to deliver on my recommendation to charge asap, then just do that if it fits into your schedule, e.g. stopping for food, just remember from half of the posters here, it seems they'd happily scratch the feck out of your car than let you charge to 81% even if you are charging at 100kW.]

I wrote a more extended post on this principle of charging as soon as you can, but not quite sure where that is now.
 

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Kia Niro EV '4' 2022
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I'll offer you one key recommendation.

I can't comment on who provides the best service these days because I have not been charging myself. What I found over the course of 7 years of charging was that companies enter the market with a fanfare, deliver great service for a while, get a bit tired of it and start losing the plot, and service quality.

Instavolt was 'the' charging company when I basically stopped public charging. Whether they have gone the same way as EH, CM, etc, before them, I cannot say.

But what I would strongly present to you is 'the best' strategy for charging your car, which is to charge early. As soon as you are able to charge so that you are sure to make it all the way home, then charge. Don't wait until you are low.

So, if you are half way on your trip somewhere and it's 150 miles to go, and you're sure that you can do 150 miles on 80% *, then charge to 80% as soon as you are able, even if you have 50% remaining.

Reasoning;
a) it doesn't matter if you stop later or earlier, if you have to stop to charge once anyway,
b) you are minimising the electricity cost away to that at your domestic rate,
c) anything can go wrong with finding a next charger, it is so much more relaxing for the rest of your trip that you can then ignore your SOC
d) if something 'does' go wrong with the charge points, you have the maximum opportunity to go find more, rather than the bare minimum.

* [I say '80%' not so much to fit in with the expectations of the zealots but simply that you are optimising battery charge times and also battery life. But if one needs to charge to 100% to deliver on my recommendation to charge asap, then just do that if it fits into your schedule, e.g. stopping for food, just remember from half of the posters here, it seems they'd happily scratch the feck out of your car than let you charge to 81% even if you are charging at 100kW.]

I wrote a more extended post on this principle of charging as soon as you can, but not quite sure where that is now.
This is good advice. Lose the mindset of ignoring the need to fill up until you get low, when you start looking for a garage. This is the ICE way. One day it will work for EVs too hopefully, but in the meantime, this is a principle I follow. I stick to preferred networks, so when I am planning where to stop, I'll include a stop at a preferred operator even if I am not low, because, as Donald says, it then puts it to bed. Those people who end up in trouble are those who think in petrol terms, get really low, find a charger, which may not be a preferred one but by then you have no choice, you find it out of use, and are knackered.
 

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Having done loads of long trips across Europe and a fair few to south Wales from Manchester, I wouldn’t really recommend Donald’s suggestion of charging up to 80% when you reach 50%, “just because you can”
IMO, this is how range anxiety is fuelled - and is inefficient.

The charge efficiency of an EV car tends to be from 10-60% before throttling starts to have a greater say.
Ive “only” got a small 60kwh battery in my Enyaq, and my trip to Denmark was done in ample time, run down to roughly 10% and then charge up to what ever will cover you to your next chargepoint.
Yes, it requires a bit of planning. A Better Route Planner (example) is great for this, you can prefer networks etc, and works well

You‘ve got a huge battery, utilise it where you can, but don’t let the range anxiety get hold of you 😉

Enjoy the trip and the new car!
 

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Having done loads of long trips across Europe and a fair few to south Wales from Manchester, I wouldn’t really recommend Donald’s suggestion of charging up to 80% when you reach 50%, “just because you can”
IMO, this is how range anxiety is fuelled - and is inefficient.
The (my) recommendation is to charge asap and enough if it gets you to your destination. How can having no more need for any charging lead to range anxiety?

I think you are referring to much longer trips of multiple charge events, for which charging at 50% would likely be a poor use of time.

That being said, with the OP's particular car, 80% down to 50% is probably 2 hours worth of driving and the sort of time to take a break. So might as well top up if you stop anyway.

Range anxiety with 108kWh? ... meh, I don't really think so ...
 

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Instavolt are still my go-to network. Last used them on Wednesday.

With over 400+ real-world miles of range, your EV experience is so far removed from most of ours as to make our opinions on when to charge irrelevant. When you're down to near 20%, you'll still have nearly 100 miles of range!

Hills will still strongly impact range, though, as they do to any type of car.

Enjoy the car.
 

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2020 VW ID.3 1st Edition Pro Performance
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With that sort of range you really don't need to be even a little worried with charging.

If you have the choice go for sites with lots of stalls, hopefully you will pretty much be able to destination charge overnight to save any grief at all.

What's the total mileage you're expecting?

Lovely car, just need the lottery win for one of those and the Taycan 😁
 

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Kia e-Niro 3 Slinky Silver, Renault Zoe R135GT
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If you use Octopus energy sign up for Electric Juice (or is it universe). Growing number of charge points you can use their card for and billing back to home account
 

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Good choice on getting Honister and Hardnott pass in, great roads to drive on.

Just don't move to far over to make way or you'll be in the ditch like others do 🤣 theres usually a car off on Hardknott at the steep climb/decent switch backs.
 

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I would NEVER get down to 10% on a lengthy (or any) journey... or ever.....

20% and I'd be getting twitchy! It's not range anxiety - it's that if you are at 10% (25-30m in my car - nearer 40 in yours) and then you get to a broken charger, move on to the next one and see it full you are starting to have a problem.

If you have nigh on 400m range, I'd adopt the "little and fairly often" strategy - get down to 30% ish and then try and make a 30%-80% top up "fit in" with what you are doing (lunch, a decent driving break etc etc)...

So, if you drive 250m that's a good 3 hrs drive - probably nearer 4 - you'll be well overdue for a stop.

I'd do 3 hours, plug in, have a snack, drink, loo, etc....

Then that will probably take you from 40% up to 60-70% (say 45 min)

Then I'd do another 2 ish hours - that will probably drop you from 70% to 25-30% or so.

Have some lunch, a break - take you from 30% back up to 70-80% or so.... that's probably given you 500m or so of driving with 0 stress, 0 worries about chargers etc.....

Even if you were to have some charger trouble, you are no-where near your danger-zone, you still have 100m or so of range...

And don't try to charge past 80% - it's utterly pointless in a car like that. Charging from 10/20% up to 80% is very very quick - but it quickly drops off from there onwards - much better to stop charging, get back on the road and use your time to travel not slow charging. Saying that, if you need to get to 82% or so that's fine - but don't wait to get to 100% - that last 10% will take as long as the previous 30% did or more even! Have you seen the charge curve for your car?

Most dealers don't tell customers this - look it up (somewhere will have it online) I suspect it will drop sharply at 80% so that's the point you unplug and go.
 

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Here you go

Rectangle Slope Plot Font Parallel


78% onwards it starts to drop (although it's still pretty fast) but you're far better to stop charging at 80% and then start again when you get back down to 15/20% or so. At 15% its charging twice as fast as at 80% but at 90% it's gone down to 25% of the rate.

Assuming 200kw rate and assuming the car does 3m per KW (not a clue what the actual figure is) then 200KW charge is adding 600m of range per hour (way faster than you can drive!) But, at 90% it's adding 150m of range every hour.

So as I say, way better to run from 100% when you start in the morning after an overnight destination charge, then plug in at 30%, charge to 70-80% and then unplug, drive and so on.... In fact in that charge schedule above, you'd almost be better unplugging at 65% or so, as that sort of battery would give you 2-3 hours driving at very short charge stops.
 

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Like many above I rely on contactless payments. But remember that a contactless card will ask you to put in your pin number every ten transactions or so. Chargers do not have keypads so you can't!

The solution is to set up Google Pay or Apple Pay on your phone. Not only do you never have to put in your pin but there's no limit to the amount of the transaction. Apart from exceeding your credit limit or bank balance of course.
 
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