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Discussion Starter #1
Just after a few suggestions...

My mother is a volunteer patient transport driver in East Yorkshire. She picks up a variety of people (many with personal mobility issues) and takes them to hospital appointments ALL OVER the country (Newcastle,Leeds, Birmingham etc).

She currently has a 3 year old Peugeot 308 estate diesel. It's fairly economical but she would love to switch to ev.

I have been driving my leaf 30kw for around a year and she loves it, but the range is nowhere near long enough for her. The 30 min rapid charging is also a problem (time wise and the almost total lack of charging in East Yorkshire) as she sometimes carries 3 passengers who all have appointments at different hospitals.

I suggested a hybrid of some sort, but have no personal experience of hybrids (went straight from petrol to full ev). I haven't really kept up with hybrids. Have tried googling and struggled to get to grips with what's what (think I have now got that age where I can't operate anything technology based without reading the instructions)

New hybrid is not really an option, pcp millage would kill a decent deal (90-100k miles a year)
She is also unpaid volunteer so money is tight for her (pensioner).

So in short,
decent sized hybrid
Reliable
Cheap to buy

Any advice gratefully received
 

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I like my Outlander a lot, but I wouldn't recommend it for someone doing such a high annual mileage. It would spend so much of it's time on running petrol that the overall economy would be worse than her diesel. I think this is going to be true for most PHEVs because they tend to work well when your typical daily mileage is short, but with long range ability on occasion. Actually a non-plugin mild hybrid like a Prius would probably get better economy than a PHEV for her usage. She would get the benefit of some regeneration and engine-off movement in traffic queues, without dragging a very heavy and often empty battery around. I can't speak for other makes of PHEV but I think the same considerations apply.

Steve
 

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What you describe is basically ideal for a diesel hybrid, because for whatever other failings they may have, diesels ARE cleaner than petrol for long motorway journeys (nox and particulates are local pollutants which are not really problematic on rural motorways stretches, and diesels are operating in ways that produce little of these anyway on the motorway, they still produce less co2 (even if nowhere near what the eu fantasy figures say)).

Combine that with doing some in-town work, and it sounds like a plug-in hybrid would be great, to give the ev range to get in and out of the towns to the hospitals.

So... How about a Volvo V60 D6? There's also a lower powered version called D5 Twinengine (not to be confused with regular D5 which are normal diesels though)

Cheap to buy? No....not going to manage that too.

Also look out for peugeot 3008 and 508SW (and RXH) with the hybrid4 drivetrain, although o do not know if they are plug in.

If we drop the plug-in requirement then there's also the mercedes e300 hybrid (again, not cheap to buy).
 

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I wonder if it would be possible to find a way of getting a car via motability if she's always transporting people with mobility issues?

I'd think any car would be a problem with such mileages. One with a 20k service interval is probably best too. Most EVs are 10k or annual and I don't think most of them are genuinely designed to do mega miles. EVs are still considered low range pootling about town cars not motorway mileage munchers. There's only really the Model S that you'd consider a long range high speed car.

Does she get paid a mileage allowance or is she paid costs for fuel and all the necessary extra maintenance?
 

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Another thing to consider is that the battery warranty on many PHEVs has a mileage limit which she would exceed in little more than a year...

Steve
 

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My last car, which I had used at 3 years old and kept 3 years, was a standard (non plug-in) Prius gen 3, it managed 58 mpg over that time mostly made up of lots of short local trips. Used for longer journeys it would have easily managed over 60 mpg. It was roomy, with plenty of space for passengers in the rear, had a decent boot, could do anything from 450 to over 600 miles on a tank and was totally reliable, I had no faults at all in 3 years. Being a Toyota 'used approved' it had the full 8 year hybrid warranty, extendable to 11 years with an inexpensive annual hybrid system health check.

I suggest a 'used approved' gen 3 Prius such as I had. Not the most exciting car to drive but for that mileage it would be very economical (no Vehicle Duty either), fairly roomy and easy to get in and out of. There are reasons they are often used as taxis.

The "cheap to buy" bit may be the crux - a used approved one from a main dealer will cost more than a non-approved, around £8000 upwards from what I can see from the Toyota website. Also would the hatch be big enough if she has to take wheelchairs etc.? It might be an idea to go and look at one to judge the space available.

Steve
 

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Also, it may be worth looking at a Toyota Auris Touring Sport hybrid estate. As with the Prius not exciting to drive, but roomy and economical, they tend to be cheaper than an equivalent age/mileage Prius and have the same hybrid drive warranty.
 

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Does she get paid a mileage allowance or is she paid costs for fuel and all the necessary extra maintenance?
I looked at doing that a few years ago and they pay a mileage rate. I didn't follow it through though as a Gen1 Leaf didn't seem practicable for it! May have been OK if it was just local but not for intercity journeys when chargers were non-existant (we're not that much better of in Yorkshire now.)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I wonder if it would be possible to find a way of getting a car via motability if she's always transporting people with mobility issues?

I'd think any car would be a problem with such mileages. One with a 20k service interval is probably best too. Most EVs are 10k or annual and I don't think most of them are genuinely designed to do mega miles. EVs are still considered low range pootling about town cars not motorway mileage munchers. There's only really the Model S that you'd consider a long range high speed car.

Does she get paid a mileage allowance or is she paid costs for fuel and all the necessary extra maintenance?
Yeah she gets a mileage allowance, but it's not a huge amount. Really does just cover fuel. Extra maintenance, insurance etc she pays herself.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks guys n gals.

We are now browsing autotrader, carwow etc.
The Prius is looking promising.
3008 she doesn't like the shape (but likes the Prius......9
Volvo v60 she loves, but the price is little too much.

Once again thanks everyone,
 

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Kia Niro? Might be too new to get one cheaply enough though. I was impressed when I drove one and managed 60 mpg even driving it quite hard at times over a 20 mile run from cold.
 

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Prius, totally reliable, totally easy to live with, just fill it up and drive it. The only hybrid system worth buying into if buying used IMHO.
 

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Ok.... just going to put this out there.

Is a Tesla any kind of possibility?

They have an unlimited mileage (8 year) powertrain warranty, and can deal with this kind of high-mileage treatment: A Tesla Model S hits 300,000 miles in just 2 years – saving an estimated $60,000 on fuel and maintenance

Yes, it would cost her ~40k upfront for a used RWD 85. However, from what you say she must be spending £12k per year on fuel (assumed 12p/mile), let alone ICE servicing, so if she were able to take advantage of Tesla supercharging, and the mileage allowance remained the same regardless of her vehicle then it could break even at about 3 years.

Tesla are offering HP at ~£550pcm which must surely be around what the expense payments are coming in at, putting it down to £10k upfront which is perhaps in the region of what she's looking at?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Ok.... just going to put this out there.

Is a Tesla any kind of possibility?

They have an unlimited mileage (8 year) powertrain warranty, and can deal with this kind of high-mileage treatment: A Tesla Model S hits 300,000 miles in just 2 years – saving an estimated $60,000 on fuel and maintenance

Yes, it would cost her ~40k upfront for a used RWD 85. However, from what you say she must be spending £12k per year on fuel (assumed 12p/mile), let alone ICE servicing, so if she were able to take advantage of Tesla supercharging, and the mileage allowance remained the same regardless of her vehicle then it could break even at about 3 years.

Tesla are offering HP at ~£550pcm which must surely be around what the expense payments are coming in at, putting it down to £10k upfront which is perhaps in the region of what she's looking at?
Looking at under 10k and the fuel savings don't matter as she is given a fuel allowance. So in theory a Tesla is far out of her price bracket.
 

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She would still get the same fuel allowance as in her ICE so that would offset the cost of running a Tesla or other EV. It could be she might not be comfortable with the size/scope of a Tesla which would be something to consider.
I'd guess a Zoe40 might be too small a vehicle for the task and charging not rapid enough. However the new Leaf 40 might prove possible perhaps? Is there flexibility in that if she was asked to visit an area poor in chargers, could she say no to accepting trips to those locations? The size of the Leaf might prove ideal for the 'taxi' task.
 

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I'd second the comments made above about a non plug-in Prius either gen 2 or gen 3 depending on budget. They've not exciting cars but very economical driven sensibly. A second choice would be an Auris. The Toyota HEVs tend to be very reliable and a good second hand choice.

I also don't think a PHEV would be any use at all given the high mileage - I guess a diesel HEV might be an option but the real world data suggests their emissions are still pretty poor in real world use.

For full electric then the Tesla is the only viable high mileage car assuming you don't want to spend a lot of time charging up but it is a very expensive up front option even second hand so probably not viable. I'm in the 35k miles/year bracket myself so don't have direct experience of 100k/year. Whether it would be viable for your mum's use depends on typical routes and SuperCharger access in those areas plus there would still be charging time implications. Cost per mile on a used Model S would be peanuts though. I typically do a 320 mile round trip one day a week with my more typical daily mileage about 85 round trip - the latter costs me more than the former per mile because it's totally covered by charging at home (on E7) whereas on the longer trip I pull off for a bacon buttie and a coffee while letting the car slurp electrons for half an hour.
 

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Looking at under 10k and the fuel savings don't matter as she is given a fuel allowance. So in theory a Tesla is far out of her price bracket.
I think the point is that the fuel allowance will cover not just fuel but additionally the OCP payments, since the fuel cost is close to zero. There are people here running EVs at a profit because their mileage is high and their employers fuel allowance is much more than they spend on fuel, somit then covers and lease payments.

However this would be a higher risk option since if she lost this job she’d be stuck with the PCP deal..
 

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Much as I love EVs, is it really worth it? With a hybrid you are going to get only a tiny percentage of your mileage on electric - insignificant really.

Within a year or two a BEV to suit her needs should be available at less than Tesla prices.
 
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