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Kona 2020 Premium SE 64kW
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, my first post here. I got my Kona 64kWh Premium SE a couple of weeks ago and an Ohme home charger last week and am delighted by both. My previous car was a 40kWh Leaf which was good but range was an issue. With this new car I feel liberated!

Anyway, I have been monitoring the indicated range on the GOM which, after my Leaf experiences, I treat with some scepticism. Despite this is has steadily crept up since I've had it and after approx 600 miles it's up to 315 miles vs. the stated range of 278. I fully understand this is affected by temperature and driving style and conditions. Here in the UK it's been lovely warm weather (mid 20's C) and most of my driving so far has been on quiet rural roads and country lanes with only a couple of bursts of motorway driving. After each reasonable length trip I see an indicated economy figure of around 4.8 miles/kWh. The last couple of trips of 100-150 miles have shown 5.0 and 5.1miles/kWh respectively at the end of the journeys. Needless to say I'm happy with this!

However checking my Ohme smart charger history which shows how much electricity I've actually consumed for each trip (charging to 100% each time so I can get accurate figures) I calculate the true economy to be more like 4.3 - 4.5 miles/kWh.

Is this expected behaviour and what are other people seeing? Even at those lower figures I'm quite happy and the calculated overall range is probably nearer the quoted range. Why would the trip meter be so inaccurate and should I ignore it?
 

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You will know from your previous EV that the winter range will be lower, for similar journeys and driving style the Kona GOM in UK midwinter might indicate somewhere around 240 - 270 miles depending on heating, lighting, headwinds and wet/ dry roads...
 

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I've found the GOM in both the Kona and the Ioniq are accurate to within a couple of miles, and that was with one journey down to 6 miles of range left. So if it says I have 30 miles left and the next charger is 20 miles away, (and it's not up a mountain) then I trust the car to get me to the charger. In the 28 kWh Ioniq I used to plan to get to a charger at around 20% left. In the Kona it will 10% to 15%, although I haven't been on a road trip yet to try rapid charging. :)
 

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I agree with Gadget Geek. But going one step further on one journey home when the GOM said I would not make it home by 5 miles, I just slowed down, slipstreamed lorries, turned off none essentials and added enough range to get home with 3 miles range. There is some wriggle room but late at night who wants to find out the hard way!
So yes I have confidence in the GOM.
 

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You are definitely experiencing losses during the charge. Assuming the charger is about 90% effective subtract 10% from 5 miles/kWh (which is 0.5kwh) and you'll get your 4.5 m/kWh.

There you go

And congrats on the car. Great choice!
 

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Kona 2020 Premium SE 64kW
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Discussion Starter #7
You are definitely experiencing losses during the charge. Assuming the charger is about 90% effective subtract 10% from 5 miles/kWh (which is 0.5kwh) and you'll get your 4.5 m/kWh.

There you go

And congrats on the car. Great choice!
Yes, that sounds logical, I should have considered those losses. So as I see it, once the car is charged I am getting a genuine 5 miles/kWh or thereabouts (during the fine weather) and over 300miles on a full "tank". I find that remarkable and shows I bought the right car!
 

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In really warm conditions the report here from Florida on one charge, is of driving almost 360 miles, with 29 left. As he says "taking it easy".
 

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Welcome, pgh1949. As esprit1st implies, you can't rely on your electricity usage to calculate range from your kWh/mile. Aside from on-board charger efficiency (91% according to Hyundai), for the first 30 minutes the 12V battery is charged as well, a further loss that tapers off depending on how much that needs. There is also a slight loss from battery resistance, maybe 1%.

DC charging is similar but you are usually billed on the DC side, avoiding charger losses, but the battery losses are higher due to higher current. Further, if your battery pack is under 15°C at the start of charging the battery heater will switch on and draw a heap of power until 15°C is reached. Hope that's helpful ...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Welcome, pgh1949. As esprit1st implies, you can't rely on your electricity usage to calculate range from your kWh/mile. Aside from on-board charger efficiency (91% according to Hyundai), for the first 30 minutes the 12V battery is charged as well, a further loss that tapers off depending on how much that needs. There is also a slight loss from battery resistance, maybe 1%.

DC charging is similar but you are usually billed on the DC side, avoiding charger losses, but the battery losses are higher due to higher current. Further, if your battery pack is under 15°C at the start of charging the battery heater will switch on and draw a heap of power until 15°C is reached. Hope that's helpful ...
Thanks, a very helpful reply and much appreciated. I now understand better what is going on.
 
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