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Play by the king and love is all I bring
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Discussion Starter #1
I’m just back from a 220 mile round trip on the M1 in the 225xe M Sport. Left the house this morning with 100% battery SOH and 3/4 tank of Shell V-Power. Reset everything before setting off. Cruise control at 75mph most of the journey, except when speed was limited to 50. Back home and I’ve nearly used all the fuel and MPG showing a very disappointing 41 mpg - which is less than my 14 year old Renault Clio runabout would achieve on the same journey (and that doesn’t have an electric motor!).


Thoroughly disappointed.
 

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That's because you sat at higher speed than ideal. Try sitting at 65mph instead. Also the 225xe is a lot taller and less aerodynamic with wider wheels... Hardly fair to compare to a 1.4 or 1.2 Clio...
 

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Play by the king and love is all I bring
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Discussion Starter #3
Are you serious? I sit at 75mph in a 14 year old petrol clio and you expect it to be more economical than a brand new BMW hybrid, because the latter is taller and has wider wheels?

Pull the other one! A modern car should be much more economical than an old banger, not even considering the fact that the 225xe is a hybrid.

41 mpg is embarrassing for the BMW.
 

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Was that 41 mpg on the readout or when you measured it at the pump? Most cars over estimate the mpg. My Prius always showed 3 or 4 mpg better than it was doing in reality. So the readout would say 65 mpg but really was only doing 62mpg
 

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Play by the king and love is all I bring
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Discussion Starter #6
Was that 41 mpg on the readout or when you measured it at the pump? Most cars over estimate the mpg. My Prius always showed 3 or 4 mpg better than it was doing in reality. So the readout would say 65 mpg but really was only doing 62mpg
It was what the car’s computer read. So by your reckoning it might actually be only 37-38 mpg in reality. :eek:

I thought the days of diesels being better for long journeys were gone and modern petrol engines were now just as economical? Seems not.
 

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Deadly serious.
How much does the BMW weigh compared to the Clio?
What engine size and generation was the Clio?
What size tyres was the Clio on and pressures? Same for BMW.

So much affects economy and speed is always a killer. Sitting at over 70 in effectively a brick, your lucky you did that albeit my old 335d touring would do better it was a lot lot more streamlined :p
 

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I'm not crazy, the attack has begun.
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I’m just back from a 220 mile round trip on the M1 in the 225xe M Sport. Left the house this morning with 100% battery SOH and 3/4 tank of Shell V-Power. Reset everything before setting off. Cruise control at 75mph most of the journey, except when speed was limited to 50. Back home and I’ve nearly used all the fuel and MPG showing a very disappointing 41 mpg - which is less than my 14 year old Renault Clio runabout would achieve on the same journey (and that doesn’t have an electric motor!).


Thoroughly disappointed.
Is that just the 'petrol miles' or does that take into account the extra electric energy?
 

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Play by the king and love is all I bring
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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Is that just the 'petrol miles' or does that take into account the extra electric energy?
I think it also takes in to account the electric miles. :eek:

I’d have saved more money by taking the 14 year old Renault Clio instead. Less fuel and no electricity bill...

Another way of looking at it is, for those looking to get a BMW hybrid to ease range anxiety for longer journeys - don’t bother - they’re unsuitable for rapid charging like BEVs are and petrol mileage is clearly very expensive, so you’d be better off with a dirty diesel. o_O
 

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My 1.8 petrol FRV would have done about 36-38mpg on that route/rate of knots.

Remember the BMW is not comparable to the best hybrids (Toyota) for motorway driving as its ICE is not an Atkinson cycle motor (which delivers superior economy at the cost of limited power).

41mpg over a route with limited opportunity for battery regen is fine.
 

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On longer (300-mile) motorway journeys, with cruise set at 77, and starting with 100% battery, I will get between 42 and 45mpg (measured at the pump, not on the trip computer) depending on the road conditions.

For comparison, the most economical of the various turbodiesels I've had (a Passat PD130) would give a genuine 52 - 55mpg at the pump in those driving conditions. But the Passat was not capable of doing my daily commute on about 30p worth of electricity.

The 225 weighs 1800kg, which is a big lump to accelerate back to cruising speed every time you slow down. That acceleration uses a lot of fuel, whether battery assisted or not.
 

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Our (thankfully) departed 1.2 3-cylinder turbo petrol Renault Captur had a claimed 50mpg, but would get around 31mpg on the onboard computer with travelling the 30 mile round trip, week day commute to Leeds (a mix of slow motorways and A roads and a few B road rat runs depending on traffic) sometimes even worse (around 28) if I was pootling around town doing very short trips (shopping/nursery drop off) if I got stuck with it on the days I work from home.

However when it had a long run out on the motorway it could return around 42mpg cursing at 70, so it was way more efficient at consistent mid-high speeds. This was the manual model, we had the auto version for two weeks in Slovenia (lovely mountain roads, but not fast, think Norway speeds in Bjorn's videos) that held up very well we managed to drive over 700 miles on 1 and a half tanks of petrol). The point of this is I find this a weirdly engineered car, its a small crossover, kid shuttle, but it seems to be built for cruising and was definitely more frugal with the EDC box fitted than the 6-speed manual.

As much as you only get 80-120 miles to play with in our two EVs, I have more confidence on how often I need to add energy to the car than we ever did in the Crapture.
 

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Play by the king and love is all I bring
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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
But the Passat was not capable of doing my daily commute on about 30p worth of electricity.
I guess this essentially is the answer, isn’t it.

My wife is the main user of this car. Her daily commute is usually under 15 miles round trip and so the 225xe manages all-electric (I would hope, anyway).

The only reason we went from BEV to PHEV, in getting this 225xe, was to reduce my wife’s range anxiety, plus she is not confident charging the BEV on the motorway rapids.

What I wasn’t anticipating, however, was very mediocre long distance motorway fuel economy that is no better than an old banger.
 

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It all depends on what you compare the vehicle with - I have a new MY19 Outlander PHEV as I needed a large AWD SUV (it replaced a 7 seat Kia Sorento with 2.2 diesel engine). On my 200-300 mile journey I’ve not had less than 40mpg, which is way better than the Kia managed. When I’m doing local mileage then I’m getting 60-90mpg depending on distance and charging opportunities (I can use Chademo to get 80% charge in around 25 mins). So for me it is a big win over the old car, which is a good comparison in terms of the Kia being a current generation diesel and was 3 years old when I changed.

I still like BEVs too, and have a 30kWh Kia Soul EV which is our go-to car when we don’t need to carry large loads or the SUV clearance and AWD of the Outlander.
 

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I guess this essentially is the answer, isn’t it.

My wife is the main user of this car. Her daily commute is usually under 15 miles round trip and so the 225xe manages all-electric (I would hope, anyway).

The only reason we went from BEV to PHEV, in getting this 225xe, was to reduce my wife’s range anxiety, plus she is not confident charging the BEV on the motorway rapids.

What I wasn’t anticipating, however, was very mediocre long distance motorway fuel economy that is no better than an old banger.
Then it's all about how many long trips it will actually do, isn't it.

(Why not Kotek anymore?)
 

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The 225xe was never developed with long (economical) distances in mind. It only really works as a vehicle for short-ish commutes or journeys. In this respect, it performs admirably.
 

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I guess this essentially is the answer, isn’t it.

My wife is the main user of this car. Her daily commute is usually under 15 miles round trip and so the 225xe manages all-electric (I would hope, anyway).

The only reason we went from BEV to PHEV, in getting this 225xe, was to reduce my wife’s range anxiety, plus she is not confident charging the BEV on the motorway rapids.

What I wasn’t anticipating, however, was very mediocre long distance motorway fuel economy that is no better than an old banger.
No better than an old banger but also no worse than most new bangers.
 

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I’m just back from a 220 mile round trip on the M1 in the 225xe M Sport. Left the house this morning with 100% battery SOH and 3/4 tank of Shell V-Power. Reset everything before setting off. Cruise control at 75mph most of the journey, except when speed was limited to 50. Back home and I’ve nearly used all the fuel and MPG showing a very disappointing 41 mpg - which is less than my 14 year old Renault Clio runabout would achieve on the same journey (and that doesn’t have an electric motor!).


Thoroughly disappointed.
I can understand why but remember you’ve got the worst of both worlds in that the battery is having to carry a fairly heavy petrol engine and vice versa. These hybrids are great when you do mostly 20 ml trips and occasional longer ones. They’re hopeless for regular long trips.
 
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