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Nottingham to South East Scotland, 265 miles. I left approx. 11am on Thursday, and got home at 1pm on the Friday - 26hrs!!!! I didn't sleep, although plenty resting at chargers.

Attached picture shows me getting the 2009 Mistubishi iMIEV from @FarmboyUK of Drive Green in Nottingham. I am not a giant by the way, if your not familiar with these cars, they are tiny things :) they don't like the wind either as I was to find out very soon. The Drive Green guys were great to deal with. They quite sensibly kept trying to talk me out of driving it home all the way, insisting I should really let them sort a trailer out. I really should have listened.....

By far the craziest trip I have ever done, and will ever do, NEVER AGAIN! Hindsight is great, but 8-year old low range iMIEV's with a poor battery state should not be doing 265 miles trips from England to Scotland. My new BEV has definite cell loss. It wouldn't even charge beyond 85% and was slow to charge at times. I did a lot of Rapid charging. There were also 4 emergency 3-pin charge stops along the way.

I was convinced early on I was never going to get home without a couple of breakdown callouts. It seems a miracle that I managed to get home without a breakdown. It was tough going to say the least, I only overtook the 1 car that I can remember, which was in the process of breaking down itself! I surely broke the record for most times being overtaken by a HGV/Car towing Caravan/Bus, even a tractor at one point!

Going down the M1 at my highest speed of 45 on the trip was not pleasant at all. I got one or two beeps. The challenge of North Yorkshire (aka the charging desert) was just to much, and saw me crawl down the hard shoulder of the A1 with my hazards on for pretty much all the 40 miles it took to get to Scotch Corner. Even then I had to stop for one of my emergency 3-pin charges.

Although it was nice to see the roads quieter at night time, the weather got worse, and I was driving with windows open to stop misting and rather cold through out the night. There were so many challenges to overcome, I couldn't charge beyond 85% at best, the range is 40-45 with extreme careful and slow driving. There was the usual stuff like broken chargers to contend with too.

I made plenty mistakes too. Because it was dark, I drove a couple of times in D mode instead of Eco. The complicated gearstick and available options are not lit up, easily done in the dark. That caused me lower range and delays. I also managed to miss a turn off or two, like when I went on the M1 far longer than planned when I didn't switch over to the A1 sooner.

I was on target to get home at 9am on Friday, until I reached Eyemouth, just over the border in Scotland where the Rapid was unexpectedly down. Only 25 miles from home at that point, I was stuck there for the next 4 hours, slow 3-pin charging.

But I made it! I learned a lot about the car on the trip. I saved a few hundred quid from not transporting it home. And hopefully I have revived an old battery a bit with all the charging. So on reflection was not all a bad experience. Looking forward to sticking to the local driving as planned now, with my museum piece of a BEV banger. The last pic show the car at home-sweet-home on my driveway.
 

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Top tip if this is whats caused your rapid charge problems.

The i-miev and it's clones tell the rapid charger to stop at around 80%. You can unplug and restart the charge and it will keep going to 100% if you are prepared to wait for the cells to balance as its very slow in the top end.

Ballsy trip!! Furthest journey i have done is 100miles

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How many miles has yours done btw and how much did you pay in the end if you dont mind me asking?

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Top tip if this is whats caused your rapid charge problems.

The i-miev and it's clones tell the rapid charger to stop at around 80%. You can unplug and restart the charge and it will keep going to 100% if you are prepared to wait for the cells to balance as its very slow in the top end.
I tried that. Unfortunately it would not charge after it cut off. The battery is not in a healthy state, it is a 8yr old car after all. What it really needed was a full 3-pin charge to get to 100% and balance the cells, as the bars/%/range statuses are all well out of sync. I never ever got a chance to do that though on the trip. I did not have a T2 adaptor for the 3-pin cable either, so 3-pin charging options were not really available, other than the emergency charges I got.

And on those 4 x 3-pin emergency charges from the nICE people as I am calling them, more details of that on this thread: The many nICE guys, who helped me get a charge when desperate.
 

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Congratulations on making it, it's certainly not a trip I would attempt even now that I'm familiar with mine and I have a good battery state of health!
I tried that. Unfortunately it would not charge after it cut off. The battery is not in a healthy state, it is a 8yr old car after all.
My Ion is 6 years old (June 2011) has done 34k miles and the battery is still at 86.4% state of health (39.5Ah or 14.4kWh) which I consider to be pretty good. So don't assume because it is 8 years old the battery will be in a poor condition.

What are you basing your estimate of the battery's health on ? Range per charge, apparent inability to rapid charge beyond 85% ? I've only tried to restart mine beyond 80% once and I only waited until 85% as it took so long so I'm not sure if they will even go higher than that on a rapid. I've seen some reports that they can reach 90% on a rapid though if you wait long enough.

Trying to estimate the SoH of the battery from the mileage you get under varying conditions especially when you're not familiar with the car is a bit of a fools game - you really need to query it with a diagnostic tool. I have the PSA diagnostic tool and can get the exact SoH of mine, no guesswork. (39.5Ah usable capacity out of 46Ah)

I was going to ask you where in Scotland you were (I'm in Motherwell) but then realised that my PSA diagnostic tool will do the C-Zero and Ion but not the i-Miev. Otherwise I could have put it on for you and given you a full battery diagnostic report including cell balance (which would identify individual dodgy cells) and usable Ah.

Your best bet if you have access to an Android device is to use Canion and/or evbatmon apps and a compatible Bluetooth OBD-II dongle (careful - only a few types work with Canion) and plug it into the car yourself - that will give you every thing you need to know including current state of every cell, true charge percentage, usable Ah capacity etc...

BTW assuming the battery is in a poor state, did you know about this before buying, or only determine this on the way home ?
What it really needed was a full 3-pin charge to get to 100% and balance the cells, as the bars/%/range statuses are all well out of sync. I never ever got a chance to do that though on the trip. I did not have a T2 adaptor for the 3-pin cable either, so 3-pin charging options were not really available, other than the emergency charges I got.
Is your i-mIev one of the really early ones that just has a weird 3 pin plug instead of a normal Type 1 connector, which plugs directly into a 3 pin plug without an EVSE ??

Before doing anything else I would run it right down (safely at home) and let it fully charge from a 3 pin or Level 2 charger right up until the charge light on the dashboard cuts out.

These cars seem to do both bottom balancing if the initial charge is less than about 30% and top balancing in the last 10% of charging. When I plug mine in at say 20% it will charge about half a kWh then "pause", where the EVSE thinks the charging is still active but the actual power consumed drops down to about 10 watts, this lasts anywhere up to about 30 minutes then the full 2.3/3.6kW charge rate resumes.

Reported full charge range on mine would not go beyond about 57 miles no matter how carefully I drove it when I first bought it - it wasn't until I did a near complete discharge and full slow recharge that the range estimate for a full charge went up to 60-75 miles depending on how I drive.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Sounds a pretty dangerous way to save a few quid:eek:
Good point that. I travelled down on train. I do admit, I did not get any sleep again until I got home on the Friday. However a large proportion of the 26 hr trip involved many hours of charging stops. There were tons of stops along the way for me to rest and relax. Plenty eating and coffee opportunities. I did not at any point feel like I could drift off or anything. The Eyemouth stop alone was 4hrs of parked up time!

The only one occasion I did feel unsafe was when a HGV overtook me a bit carelessly, there was plenty room yet he pulled in to soon and forced me to swerve over to the left as far as I could. Other than that I never felt unsafe at any point. I found for much of the journey the daytime traffic was so busy that the left lane was going slow anyway, quite suitably for me. Then when night came I quite liked that the roads were more quiet. I got into the habit of putting my hazards on if I saw something coming up behind as they may not have expected my slow speeds.

I still wouldn't recommend anyone does such a trip on an old ION/MIEV/CZERO. I wouldn't do it again, but hindsight is great right?

I don't get range anxiety in my 24kW Leaf, other than maybe the first month or so of owning it (in 3rd year now with it). I could not deny there was lots and lots of range anxiety with this trip in the iMIEV though. 3 of my 3-pin charge stops were when I thought I wouldn't make the charger, was usually just 2 miles away. I maybe could have made 1 or 2 of the stops and got lucky, but out of those 3 emergency 3-pin stops, at least one or more were bound to result in a flat battery. Important to stress that I did have a breakdown cover plan in place. The seller Drive Green, kept strongly suggesting I did that too, they were worried about me getting home. No one should really do a trip like that if they are sensible, but if you do, definitely have breakdown cover, is good peace of mind, and if Plan A, Plan B, Plan C etc fails, Plan Z is always there.

These cars just don't like an open road, or the speeds required to be on a motorway. They definitely don't like the wind either. A small car, with small tyres, the wind can just be a bit of a killer really.

The worst part was at night when I had to have the windows open due to misting and steaming up. Even with my hat and gloves on, it was pretty cold.

What are you basing your estimate of the battery's health on ? Range per charge, apparent inability to rapid charge beyond 85% ? I've only tried to restart mine beyond 80% once and I only waited until 85% as it took so long so I'm not sure if they will even go higher than that on a rapid. I've seen some reports that they can reach 90% on a rapid though if you wait long enough.
Yep fair point, and it is a bit of guesswork and assumption on my part. The 85% charge was the first and best charge. After that it was about 79% max, one charge only went to 69% and would not let me go further. I got a few battery warning lights along the way too. I believe the battery was at risk of over heating from the frequent driving/rapid charging and protecting itself by not allowing further charge. I consider that a good thing though.

Is more about the history of these cars. They simply have a track record for battery degradation even if not used and heighted by the general lack of usage. I think it may have actually be a benefit that this car has over 40,000 miles on it, as 8,000 miles a year is above the average and reasonable usage. It has been idle for a while though for most of the last year.

I did some rough but reasonable calcs in my head during the trip also, based on the bars, what k/w used to charge a bar, % charged etc. I reckoned there was at worst 10kW of useable battery at least from the 16kW. How much more than that I was not sure and optimistic about.

Trying to estimate the SoH of the battery from the mileage you get under varying conditions especially when you're not familiar with the car is a bit of a fools game - you really need to query it with a diagnostic tool.
Yeah I agree again, someone local in the industry with good expertise, did offer to hook up to Canion for me. I will be taking up that offer to get a more scientific and accurate reflection on the battery.

BTW assuming the battery is in a poor state, did you know about this before buying, or only determine this on the way home ?
I worked on an assumption the elec. battery was not going to be the best. The seller who is reputable and trustworthy as far as I am concerned took it out on a couple of extended test drives and gave me a honest judgement on how it was performing too. I paid £3500 for it which I thought was a fair price all round and reflective of market pricing for IMIEV/ION/C-ZERO's. As anyone who has looked into buying one will know, a lot of these used cars are well over priced. I should add to put some context onto the purchase I made with one of these eco car dealers (Drive Green / @FarmboyUK)... I got honesty, a fair price, and some extras. They took the car to Nottingham to reduce my drive home, it could have been worse. They gave me 3 months warranty. They very recently changed the 12v battery for a new one. As it does not have a SatNav, they even kindly supplied me one I could borrow to get home. I am happy to recommend Drive Green to others, they are good guys and has been a pleasure to deal with them and will definitely consider them again for my next BEV purchase..

Is your i-mIev one of the really early ones that just has a weird 3 pin plug instead of a normal Type 1 connector, which plugs directly into a 3 pin plug without an EVSE ??
Yes, that bit sucks but at least there are solutions to improve charging flexibility. A T2-3pin adaptor cable just arrived in the post today so I can T2 public charge now (could have done that for the trip home!) There are similar adaptors for a 7kW home charger, but I can get a 2nd home charger installed for free, and will do so. A lower rate charger will suit me as that performs better economically wise, with excess Solar PV production.

Before doing anything else I would run it right down (safely at home) and let it fully charge from a 3 pin or Level 2 charger right up until the charge light on the dashboard cuts out.
Already doing so as we speak. I wanted to give it 24hrs to rest and let the battery cool down and have a break.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
How many miles has yours done btw and how much did you pay in the end if you dont mind me asking?
£3,500 paid to Drive Green ( @FarmboyUK )for the car. All things considered, the 3-month warranty supplied by seller, and the market prices for these types of cars (and very few options), I believe it was a fair and very reasonable price. It was also recently MOT'd/Serviced, and just had a new 12V battery put in. I can get a free 2nd home charger now also as I now have a 2nd EV.

Didn't expect too much for the money either. I mean I was aware it had a bad reputation for motorways and I think it sucks on motorways. But for local driving or a daily 30 mile each way commute, it seems very capable. I just seen it as a reasonable low running cost car, at a reasonable price, I always felt I was buying a low budget banger of a BEV. I really do consider it to be a museum piece.
 

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What a trip Jonathan.

We at Drive Green are so happy that you made it home safely. Even if it did take longer than Le Mans!

I hope you have an amazing time with your new bargain EV and that it has a much more relaxed life now in it's new home.

The journey sounded pretty arduous but what an electric adventure. Thank you for documenting your experience so well. I think I can speak for everyone on here when I say we all love to read stories like this.

You are an EV hero and there was seemingly no way we could have encouraged you not to do this. Look forward to seeing you again in the future.

Andy
 

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Great effort/story,you should of Vlogged it,one to tell the grand kids for sure.
Certainly living up to the saying, "Scotland,home of the brave"

:)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I thought about doing a detailed website piece or something on it and starting off taking photos at every charger. After I realised what I was going to be truly in for and the umpteenth charge stop I soon stopped taking photos everywhere.

To give you an idea, although I knew it would be a challenge, I started off thinking I might get home for midnight the same day I got the car. I got home 13 hours later than midnight!

I just finished my first ever full charge to 100%. The 3rd attached photo shows the trip reading as 333 miles. I took the claimed 265 miles from the AA's Route Planner mileage for Nottingham to my house. So the actual trip was much longer. The 333 miles done can be explained by a few instances or driving around a bit lost, looking for a charger (we have all been there, right?), and some backtracking for 3-pin charges, and taking a slightly longer road than needed when I forgot to turn off onto A1 at one point.

Note the 1st attached photo shows an estimated range of 109 miles for the 100% battery. The range reading always seems to be a bit wacky. I did crawl home on my last part of the trip too.

And although it shows as "km" it is definitely miles covered. I don't know how to change the unit description on that from km to miles, does anyone know how I can do this? @DBMandrake might know?
 

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Looking good Jonathan. I would love to be proven wrong but I believe it can't be changed from km.

It is a bit confusing when you get in your first Japanese i-Miev and everything says km but reads in miles. I think your range remaining might be a little bit optimistic haha
 

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Well done on your purchase and journey home. Brought my 2012 C Zero home over a similar distance in June. My trip was a doddle compared to yours.
Does the air con come on when you rapid charge?
Completed six or seven rapid charges and the air con kept the battery cool or so I presumed.
Interested in the km display wanted to switch all mine to kms (units as well though)
 

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The air con comes on and off repeatedly, is not on constantly when charging. I think it comes on a little to even if 3 pin charging, but that may have just been because of my high battery temp from the intense usage.

If your units are the same as the measurement label then *I think* all you need to do is hold the button in for a few seconds and it should alternate between km and miles.
 

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These cars just don't like an open road, or the speeds required to be on a motorway. They definitely don't like the wind either. A small car, with small tyres, the wind can just be a bit of a killer really.
I did a trip across to Edinburgh and back on Wednesday - for the return trip (which is somewhat uphill) I started with a 100% charge from the destination charger at the zoo, and made it back home with 20 miles estimated remaining, which added to the actual distance travelled (including a detour) is 58 miles - this trip was mostly motorway although I limited myself to 60mph on purpose as I wasn't sure how much I would have left including a detour, but as it happened I made it easily.

If I had charged to 80% at a rapid instead of 100% at a Level 2 charger it would have been cutting it very fine indeed and I probably would have stopped for a 10 minute rapid charge part way along.

As long as I don't go over 60mph I seem to get nearly 60 miles of motorway travelling - albeit with no heater use. Start using the heater or aircon a lot and that could drop to 45 miles.

They don't like crosswinds as you've discovered - a strong crosswind at motorway speeds will tend to push the car around a lot, however if there are no crosswinds the car is perfectly happy to sit at 60 or even 70 on the motorway but of course range at 70mph will be significantly less.
The worst part was at night when I had to have the windows open due to misting and steaming up. Even with my hat and gloves on, it was pretty cold.
My technique for demisting the window with minimal energy use is to just use aircon set to one notch on the red/blue control, and 1-2 notches on the manual fan speed control with the direction set to windscreen only. This usually clears it up very quickly and you can cycle it on for about 1 minute every 5 minutes which uses very little energy. (The A/C only uses about 1/3rd of the energy of the heater)

You can run the A/C and heater at the same time for maximum demisting without freezing yourself but it REALLY chews through the power.
Yep fair point, and it is a bit of guesswork and assumption on my part. The 85% charge was the first and best charge. After that it was about 79% max, one charge only went to 69% and would not let me go further. I got a few battery warning lights along the way too. I believe the battery was at risk of over heating from the frequent driving/rapid charging and protecting itself by not allowing further charge. I consider that a good thing though.
I'd be interested to know which light you think is a battery warning light - as far as I know there is no warning light for the traction battery, the only battery warning light I'm aware of is for the 12v battery, so perhaps you have a problem with the 12v DC-DC charger or the 12v battery ?

These cars blast the traction battery enclosure with the aircon when you rapid charge using Chademo, so they shouldn't overheat when rapid charging. Did you hear the dashboard fan come on at full speed during Chademo charging, but with no air coming through the vents ? If so it should be cooling the pack, assuming that your A/C does actually work.
Is more about the history of these cars. They simply have a track record for battery degradation even if not used and heighted by the general lack of usage.
Where have you read that ? I've not read of any track record of excessive battery degradation of i-Miev's - quite the contrary, they seem to last a lot better than 1st gen Leaf packs. Remember that the i-Miev cools the pack with A/C during rapid charging while the Leaf does not...
I think it may have actually be a benefit that this car has over 40,000 miles on it, as 8,000 miles a year is above the average and reasonable usage. It has been idle for a while though for most of the last year.
If mine is anything to go by (already past 34k) your pack is probably fine at 40k, I wouldn't worry about it. Wait until you get a reading from Canion.
I did some rough but reasonable calcs in my head during the trip also, based on the bars, what k/w used to charge a bar, % charged etc. I reckoned there was at worst 10kW of useable battery at least from the 16kW. How much more than that I was not sure and optimistic about.



Yeah I agree again, someone local in the industry with good expertise, did offer to hook up to Canion for me. I will be taking up that offer to get a more scientific and accurate reflection on the battery.
Let us know what result you get when you hook up canion - I'd be interested to know.
I worked on an assumption the elec. battery was not going to be the best. The seller who is reputable and trustworthy as far as I am concerned took it out on a couple of extended test drives and gave me a honest judgement on how it was performing too. I paid £3500 for it which I thought was a fair price all round and reflective of market pricing for IMIEV/ION/C-ZERO's. As anyone who has looked into buying one will know, a lot of these used cars are well over priced.
I paid £4200 for my 2011 so I think you've certainly got a fair price there if it is working reasonably well.
Yes, that bit sucks but at least there are solutions to improve charging flexibility. A T2-3pin adaptor cable just arrived in the post today so I can T2 public charge now (could have done that for the trip home!) There are similar adaptors for a 7kW home charger, but I can get a 2nd home charger installed for free, and will do so. A lower rate charger will suit me as that performs better economically wise, with excess Solar PV production.
Can you charge at 16A / 3.6kW with your weird socket and adaptor or are you limited to the same 10A / 2.4kW you'll get with a granny cable even on a Level 2 charger ?

I've just got a proper charge point installed at home (after nearly 6 months of using a 3 pin granny charger) and the extra 50% charging speed is nice.
£3,500 paid to Drive Green (
Didn't expect too much for the money either. I mean I was aware it had a bad reputation for motorways and I think it sucks on motorways. But for local driving or a daily 30 mile each way commute, it seems very capable. I just seen it as a reasonable low running cost car, at a reasonable price, I always felt I was buying a low budget banger of a BEV. I really do consider it to be a museum piece.
Short range if go over 60mph and sensitivity to crosswinds at motorway speeds is definitely an issue, but other than that I find mine perfectly usable on the motorway.

My daily commute is 38 miles round trip, half at 30mph, half at motorway speeds - when I first got it I used to drive conservatively and stick to 55mph but I was getting home with over 50% battery left so I started to get a heavier foot.... I now do 60 and sometimes even 70 if I'm running a bit late and it seems to handle it just fine, albeit I only have 40% left when I get home.

I'm sure when winter arrives and I'm forced to use the heater I'll have to go back to conservative driving to make the trip comfortably but I'm happy to do that.

I just finished my first ever full charge to 100%. The 3rd attached photo shows the trip reading as 333 miles. I took the claimed 265 miles from the AA's Route Planner mileage for Nottingham to my house. So the actual trip was much longer. The 333 miles done can be explained by a few instances or driving around a bit lost, looking for a charger (we have all been there, right?), and some backtracking for 3-pin charges, and taking a slightly longer road than needed when I forgot to turn off onto A1 at one point.

Note the 1st attached photo shows an estimated range of 109 miles for the 100% battery. The range reading always seems to be a bit wacky. I did crawl home on my last part of the trip too.

And although it shows as "km" it is definitely miles covered. I don't know how to change the unit description on that from km to miles, does anyone know how I can do this? @DBMandrake might know?
Are you sure it's not showing km ? It says km in the range remaining image. ;)

You can switch these cars between miles and km, although the way to do it is a little bit hidden. Press the stalk repeatedly until you get to the total (lifetime) mileage screen, hold down the stalk for at least 5 seconds - you won't see any change as the total mileage screen always uses the same units. However now press the stalk repeatedly to get back to the range remaining screen and you should now see it in miles...

109 miles is totally impossible even new, there's no way that is miles that it's reporting. 109km on the other hand is perfectly believable - that's 67.7 miles and I frequently see higher than that for my full charge range. Typically I see 60-75 depending on how I drove recently, motorway or urban speeds respectively. On the motorway at 60mph I can almost achieve 60 miles, if I stick to urban 30mph driving I can genuinely achieve 75 miles.

Every now and then the GOM full charge reading goes a bit whacky on me - after charging back up from our trip to Edinburgh I was greeted with this claim of 89 miles: :ROFLMAO:

89 miles.png


I've had this happen a couple of times before - not sure what causes it, but I know there's no way I could achieve that range... After a few miles driving the estimate drops rapidly and becomes more reasonable...
 

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The air con comes on and off repeatedly, is not on constantly when charging. I think it comes on a little to even if 3 pin charging, but that may have just been because of my high battery temp from the intense usage.
Aircon is not used on 3 pin or Level 2 charging only Chademo. There are actually 3 different noises you will hear and you may be confusing them.

1) When you first plug in a Level 2 charge you'll hear a fan under the back of the car blow for about 5 seconds then go off - this is the extractor fan for the battery enclosure. This will come on during Chademo charging and may also come on during Level 2 charging if the cells get too hot, although I am yet to ever hear it come on during a Level 2 charge except for that initial 5 second burst. (which is probably to test the fan is working) It probably also runs during driving if the battery is hot but I'm yet to notice it.

2) For about 30 seconds every 3-5 minutes the coolant pump will run. This sounds like a small water pump at the rear of the car. This pumps coolant through the motor, drive inverter and onboard charger then through the radiator up front. It cools the onboard charger. This is probably the noise you heard that you thought was A/C.

When driving you'll also hear it come on (usually when you're stopped at the lights) where it is cooling the drive inverter and motor. (Don't confuse it with the similar sounding vacuum pump for the brakes)

3) A/C will run during a Chademo charge. The cabin blower fan will run full blast the whole time, (but is directed by a flap into the battery enclosure, so you won't feel it in the cabin) however the A/C compressor will only come on if the batteries are above the ideal temperature. In warm weather I find the A/C compressor runs constantly during a rapid charge but now that things are getting colder the compressor only runs intermittently.
 

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Yesterday we took the car out for a local trip, to see how it got on and the wife wanted to have a go of driving it. We were not even out the street when some kids took interest in us, with one shouting "hi people in your tiny wee car". Then later on some adults were pointing and starting at the car as we passed them in a High Street.

Did not expect that, I thought you had to drive the likes of a Twizy or G-Wiz to get the stares and noticeable interest. I guess I will get used to that, if it is going to be a common occurrence.

So the trip last night was a 13 mile there, 13 mile back (26 miles in total covered). We left with a full 100% charge of 16 bars. We returned home with 3 bars left.

We did approx. 2.5 miles per bar. So our capable range on that full 100% charge was 40 miles. To put it into some context however, 90% of the journey was on the A1 (fast road) and my wife drove at 50-55mph through out. We also had 3 of us in the car (2 adults and a 8yr old), and we had the heating on warm with blower to stop windows misting. The lights were also on full as it was getting quite dark, and the radio was on too as my kid insisted we have some music. I will do the same trip sometime with just me in the car, no heating etc on and a 45mph speed (is a very quiet road) and see how I get on and how the range improves.

The "epic journey" home from Nottingham certainly would have been a lot less epic if I had been able to drive from charger to charger with a 100% charge. Those extra 4 bars really make a big difference in the range.
 

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Yesterday we took the car out for a local trip, to see how it got on and the wife wanted to have a go of driving it. We were not even out the street when some kids took interest in us, with one shouting "hi people in your tiny wee car". Then later on some adults were pointing and starting at the car as we passed them in a High Street.

Did not expect that, I thought you had to drive the likes of a Twizy or G-Wiz to get the stares and noticeable interest. I guess I will get used to that, if it is going to be a common occurrence.
Can't say that anyone has ever stared or said anything about ours - the only stares I usually get are the "I nearly stepped out in front of you because I didn't hear you coming and now I'm going to give you the stink eye" look. :p
So the trip last night was a 13 mile there, 13 mile back (26 miles in total covered). We left with a full 100% charge of 16 bars. We returned home with 3 bars left.

We did approx. 2.5 miles per bar. So our capable range on that full 100% charge was 40 miles. To put it into some context however, 90% of the journey was on the A1 (fast road) and my wife drove at 50-55mph through out. We also had 3 of us in the car (2 adults and a 8yr old), and we had the heating on warm with blower to stop windows misting. The lights were also on full as it was getting quite dark, and the radio was on too as my kid insisted we have some music. I will do the same trip sometime with just me in the car, no heating etc on and a 45mph speed (is a very quiet road) and see how I get on and how the range improves.
I was about to say that range didn't seem right at all but then I got to the bit where you said you put the heater on.....:LOL:

If I was doing 55-60mph with the heater on a decent amount I would expect to get only about 45 miles, so you're not too far off there, although it does still sound like your battery SoH is lower than mine. Without the heater I'd expect more like 55-60 miles. The heater makes a massive difference.

A small tip - don't use auto fan speed. The amount of power that the heater uses actually depends primarily on the fan speed not the temperature setting, contrary to what you might expect at first. If you keep the fan speed down to 1 or 2 clicks once you're warmed up you can still set the temperature to 2-3 clicks into the red without using as much power.

Auto fan speed makes the amount of power the heater will use (and the range remaining indicator - which is affected by the fan speed when A/C and/or heater are on) very unpredictable because it adjusts the fan speed for you - better to set the fan speed yourself to the minimum you need and you know it will stay constant and so will your power drain and effect on range.

Radio, headlights and extra passengers all make precious little difference to range in this car in my experience - my trip to Edinburgh the other day was 3 adults plus a toddler, a buggy and all the paraphernalia needed by a toddler, and it had negligible impact on my miles/kWh.

It's heater, road speed and A/C in that order that affect range with the heater really killing the range if you crank it up. It will be interesting to see how I manage in winter - in the current mixed weather I either don't use the heater at all or I keep it set to 1-2 notches in the red with the fan only on 1 notch, which uses quite a bit less power than the GOM estimates, but still uses quite a bit of power.

I find A/C clears any fog on the window much faster and with less energy use than the heater, as long as its not too cold to put up with the occasional blast of A/C on the window!

It will be interesting to see what kind of range you can get with the heater off or find out the Canion results.
 

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Agree heater is the real killer. Never used it down here in middle earth. Dont laugh but we did get a tip from someone here to put cat litter in a pair of black socks and tuck it down the gap either side of the dash by the A pillar and guess what it actually helped to keep misting up at bay most of the time and you really couldnt notice the socks at all. Also used heated seat covers a couple of times when really cold. Without heating 60 miles was quite easy in summer and with care in winter and speed at 55 or below in a 2011 ion. Bare in mind it is quite mild winters here though.
 
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