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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I’m looking for advice on what are the best rates achievable from a 3 phase domestic supply, and what unit to attach it to?
I have a Model S on order, and curious whether to get the Tesla Wall Charger or a n other.

Thanks in advance.
 

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IMO Tesla is best value and supports up to 22kW, but I think you can only purchase officially if you have a VIN. Shame if true as someone (like me!) might get a Zoe now but have a deposit down for a M3.

Not sure if OLEV grants covers >7kW and you need to get permission from DNO too. I noticed Chargemaster are expensive for 3 phase.

Have you got 3 phase or putting it in?

The manual is available at

Installation Manuals - Wall Connector
 
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I’m looking for advice on what are the best rates achievable from a 3 phase domestic supply, and what unit to attach it to?
I have a Model S on order, and curious whether to get the Tesla Wall Charger or a n other.
If buying new, your Tesla Model S/X will charge at:
  • 7.3kW from single phase 32A (the most common home charging setup)
  • 16.6kW from three-phase 24A (max possible on current cars)
As a rough rule of thumb, 1kWh gives 3 miles of range, so those charge rates correspond to 22mph/50mph charging rate respectively - miles of range gained per hour of charging.

If buying used, you may get 11kW, 16.6kW or 22kW from three-phase depending on the age of the car and the options selected when it was bought.

For most people, 7kW overnight charging is perfectly adequate; however, if you already have a three-phase supply at home then the option for faster charging is a 'nice to have' for rare occasions such as when you arrive home from a day's driving and want to depart again that evening with a 'full tank'. Very few people could justify having a new 3-phase supply brought into the house just for the sake of the faster charging.

The Tesla WC is a nice unit and supports either single- or three-phase, whichever is available to connect it to. However, the charging rates are exactly the same as chargepoints from other vendors (though those typically have different models for single- vs three-phase).

Nice things about the Tesla WC compared to generic units are:
  • Button on the connector to automatically unlock the chargeport on the car (otherwise you need to use the keyfob).
  • Support for expansion to two or more WCs wired on the same circuit, sharing out the available mains power between them. It's unlikely that your domestic electrical supply has enough spare capacity for two chargepoints at full power, but connecting two WCs allows one car to charge at full speed if the other car is already full or not there, while allowing both cars to charge at half speed simultaneously for normal overnight charging.
  • Aesthetics are arguably better for the Tesla unit than many others
  • The Tesla unit is competitively priced for a unit with its features.
Downsides are:
  • The Tesla unit is not registered for the OLEV grant scheme, so you will have to pay all the costs of buying the unit and installation. Third party units can be had on the grant scheme which pays a contribution of up to £500 (though some of that gets eaten up in the costs of applying for the grant and the fact that you have to use a registered installer who may have to travel some distance).
  • Unit is tethered with a Type2 plug. It will charge most non-Tesla vehicles, but not those with a Type1 connector (relevant if you get keen enough on EVs that you decide to buy a used Leaf as a 2nd car).
Note that even if there is already three-phase in the house, domestic setups often don't have three-phase switchgear (there may be separate consumer units for the three phases, feeding single phase loads), so it will be slightly more expensive to install three-phase than single-phase just in terms of the parts you need to connect in to the existing installation.

Bottom line: if money no object, definitely get the Tesla WC on three-phase. If penny-pinching, a third party single phase unit will get the job done. Up to you how you value the advantages (and the exact incremental costs will depend on your situation).
 

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Discussion Starter #4
IMO Tesla is best value and supports up to 22kW, but I think you can only purchase officially if you have a VIN. Shame if true as someone (like me!) might get a Zoe now but have a deposit down for a M3.

Not sure if OLEV grants covers >7kW and you need to get permission from DNO too. I noticed Chargemaster are expensive for 3 phase.

Have you got 3 phase or putting it in?

The manual is available at

Installation Manuals - Wall Connector
Cheers,

The house has 3 phase into, however only uses single at present.

The choice will depend on whether it’s better to:
-run 3 phase subject to a new meter. We have solar panels and the benefit of an analogue meter spinning backwards at times;
-asking for a different meter for night rate electric.

We have a 7kw Chargemaster which we get 3.5kw for the Merc B250e, which would benefit from the Tesla WC as well for 11kw 3 phase option. Would the Chargemaster do for the 75D overnight really?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If buying new, your Tesla Model S/X will charge at:
  • 7.3kW from single phase 32A (the most common home charging setup)
  • 16.6kW from three-phase 24A (max possible on current cars)
As a rough rule of thumb, 1kWh gives 3 miles of range, so those charge rates correspond to 22mph/50mph charging rate respectively - miles of range gained per hour of charging.

If buying used, you may get 11kW, 16.6kW or 22kW from three-phase depending on the age of the car and the options selected when it was bought.

For most people, 7kW overnight charging is perfectly adequate; however, if you already have a three-phase supply at home then the option for faster charging is a 'nice to have' for rare occasions such as when you arrive home from a day's driving and want to depart again that evening with a 'full tank'. Very few people could justify having a new 3-phase supply brought into the house just for the sake of the faster charging.

The Tesla WC is a nice unit and supports either single- or three-phase, whichever is available to connect it to. However, the charging rates are exactly the same as chargepoints from other vendors (though those typically have different models for single- vs three-phase).

Nice things about the Tesla WC compared to generic units are:
  • Button on the connector to automatically unlock the chargeport on the car (otherwise you need to use the keyfob).
  • Support for expansion to two or more WCs wired on the same circuit, sharing out the available mains power between them. It's unlikely that your domestic electrical supply has enough spare capacity for two chargepoints at full power, but connecting two WCs allows one car to charge at full speed if the other car is already full or not there, while allowing both cars to charge at half speed simultaneously for normal overnight charging.
  • Aesthetics are arguably better for the Tesla unit than many others
  • The Tesla unit is competitively priced for a unit with its features.
Downsides are:
  • The Tesla unit is not registered for the OLEV grant scheme, so you will have to pay all the costs of buying the unit and installation. Third party units can be had on the grant scheme which pays a contribution of up to £500 (though some of that gets eaten up in the costs of applying for the grant and the fact that you have to use a registered installer who may have to travel some distance).
  • Unit is tethered with a Type2 plug. It will charge most non-Tesla vehicles, but not those with a Type1 connector (relevant if you get keen enough on EVs that you decide to buy a used Leaf as a 2nd car).
Note that even if there is already three-phase in the house, domestic setups often don't have three-phase switchgear (there may be separate consumer units for the three phases, feeding single phase loads), so it will be slightly more expensive to install three-phase than single-phase just in terms of the parts you need to connect in to the existing installation.

Bottom line: if money no object, definitely get the Tesla WC on three-phase. If penny-pinching, a third party single phase unit will get the job done. Up to you how you value the advantages (and the exact incremental costs will depend on your situation).
Cheers,

It’s more a nice to have and fortunate enough to be able to do.

We have a Chargemaster 7kw, installed for our Merc B250e, so it would do for the 75D on order.

The 3 phase is easily done thankfully. Straight 5 meter run from elec cupboard to outside wall. I wasn’t sure what the max achievable was from home, whether it was limited to 16.5kw because of Tesla’s own WC.

It does look nice, and easy use for latching and both EVs.

Thank you.
 

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A Tesla with "75"kWh battery will charge from empty to full in about 11 hours on a single phase 32A unit. That is fine for nearly all Tesla owners.

I also have a property with 3 phase power connected and available but only 1 of them in use. Will be interested to hear more if you decide to use all 3.
 

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I wasn’t sure what the max achievable was from home, whether it was limited to 16.5kw because of Tesla’s own WC.
The limitation is in the newer cars rather than the WC. The WC can do 22kW (32A x 3-phase) if I bring my old S85 round to visit....

Another consideration for what to install is that you've got 2 EVs - although single phase charging for each would probably be fine, quite likely you haven't got spare capacity for a second 7kW chargepoint and the house all on just one phase (presumably it's at least a reasonably large house else the three-phase wouldn't be there in the first place). So if you've got to activate the three-phase supply anyhow, you might as well do the job properly and get your new chargepoint to be three-phase.
 

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The choice will depend on whether it’s better to:
-run 3 phase subject to a new meter. We have solar panels and the benefit of an analogue meter spinning backwards at times;
-asking for a different meter for night rate electric.
You will certainly benefit from getting a 2 rate, peak/offpeak meter fitted, and if three phase is available, well seems silly not to have that enabled at the same time!
 

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Not sure if OLEV grants covers >7kW and you need to get permission from DNO too.
There are 22kW points available with OLEV grant (e.g. Podpoint).

DNO consent is not required unless you exceed 32A per phase (i.e. multiple chargepoints).
 

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here are 22kW points available with OLEV grant (e.g. Podpoint).
Good to know as based on cost, when I last looked, Chargemaster one certainly wasn't.
 
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Rolec has very affordable 3phase versions of their wallboxes. At work (where I do have 3x63A) I bought a Mennekes/Amtron one instead, cost was around 1000 UKP without installation.
 
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