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I have just bought an e-golf (great!). I intend only to use 3 pin wall socket charging as I only do low mileage (av 100 per week). The salesman suggested charging overnight on a cheap tariff and using a simple 3 pin timer plug/socket to switch it on and off at preset times. I'm a bit concerned that these timers aren't up to the job of a few hours throughput at 13A. Any views/recommendations?
 

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I'd certainly be checking the rated current on any timer you're using, but I think to state a current on them and be certified they have to show that they can sustain a current on excess of the rating.

Personally I'd go for an electronic switch rather than mechanical, to avoid sparking during switching, but it's probably not a big deal. The current won't come on immediately.
 

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Similar here. I did this:

Bought a 2nd hand podpoint charger and fitted it outside. I drilled a hole directly through the wall into the back of the podpoint. I installed an old economy 7 water timeswitch on the wall inside, working from the 2Amp fused podpoint supply. I interrrupted the control lead to the vehicle, bringing some bell wire into the timeswitch.

To start with, I just had an isolated relay in the timeswitch connected across the bell wire. I found that sometimes charging did not happen, as the plug was not fully inserted in the car. I needed to get the podpoint to acknowledge the car without actually charging it. I connected a diode across the relay (cathode going to car).Also added a 100uF capacitor -ve to earth. Used the relay break contact to disconnect the capacitor.+ve from the cathode when timer engages.

Optional: Fit a tricolour led to timeswitch and connect in parallel with podpoint indicator. (Use 1k resistor to limit current on each colour.)

I wouldn't be using a plug in timeswitch as you suggest. When the switch opens it will have to interrupt the whole 10 Amps! :)
 

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I'm pretty certain the e-Golf supports timed charges - the loaner I had did. You can set them up in the infotainment menu. I really don't like the idea of using those inexpensive timer switches to switch 10A loads on and off.
 

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Fixed wiring immersion heater timer is the way to go. The only way. If you use 13A plug in versions you will be replacing them monthly!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
E-golf has a timer no need for an external one. Also, many will not be rated correctly so your asking for a fire.
I read somewhere that you could start a charge at a certain time but could not select a stop time, it would just charge until full. Am I mistaken? I'd want to charge up to around 80% most times.
 

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I read somewhere that you could start a charge at a certain time but could not select a stop time, it would just charge until full. Am I mistaken? I'd want to charge up to around 80% most times.
You are mistaken at least on the GTE and as far as I know e-Golf is the same, you can set the maximum charge for a given location and have one location for each charge. It is a bit convoluted but I have no issue keeping my home charge at 100% and work charging at 60-90% (depending on amount required to get home.)
 

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I have just bought an e-golf (great!). I intend only to use 3 pin wall socket charging as I only do low mileage (av 100 per week). The salesman suggested charging overnight on a cheap tariff and using a simple 3 pin timer plug/socket to switch it on and off at preset times. I'm a bit concerned that these timers aren't up to the job of a few hours throughput at 13A. Any views/recommendations?
Just use the charge timer on the car.

Your salesman is a typical know-nothing type. They will tell you absolutely any bullshit just so you stop asking more questions.

A plug timer is actually OK on 3 pin to start a charge, might even be a good idea. There is no fuse in them (normally) so the thermal conductance is high, so if there were to be any problems then any heat will stay on the plug side and burn the timer rather than your wall socket. The internal connections are very short.

But that's not the reason not to use a timer, the problem is powering off. If you break the connection carrying 30A at the peak of the cycle you will get some big fat spikes into your delicate electronics. It needs to be soft-switched OFF by your on board charger.
 

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I used a hard wired home automation solution to power off/on 16A point for the B250e as the car timer didn't work. Benefit of that solution was it was easy to override charging in app. Was OK solution but car based timers are better.
 
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