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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Anyone who is contemplating the purchase of a Mitsubishi i-MiEV ( or the Citroen/Peugeot clones ) may be interested to know that a dealer in Edinburgh - Longstone Ltd. - has 6 of them for sale.
They are all 2011, white, one owner: North Lanarkshire Council. Mileage is low, most are less than 20K, one is 12K and one is 30K. Asking prices £5295 to £5695. Many have new tyres, discs, pads, 12v battery. Significantly, all have been undersealed. ( Having just put my 2012 Ion through an MOT, I wish it had been ! )
From the MOT history of the disclosed registration numbers ( SL11WKY, SL11ZRC, SL11WLA ), they have not been used for the past 2 years.

[ I have no connection to the Seller.]
 

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There's a lot of them to come up for sale soon. There's a mass of Arnold Clark leases on white iOns/C-Zeros that were on car club/council fleets that have just recently ended and been returned so there should be no shortage. These ones are all 66 Plates though and I imagine probably around double the asking price of these early 2011 Ones.

I Wonder how the batteries are doing on the early ones you have found up for sale. I Started off my EV life with a 11 Plate iOn which I got rid of about 5 years ago now. At that point my SOH Was in the low 80's from memory. Really hope the degradation has slowed down a bit or that mine was just a bad example as the batteries were already tiny to start with before you add in any significant amount of wear, especially in winter where you need the heater running.
 

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I think there is quite a variation on battery condition when you get to 2011 models depending on how they have been used and charged.

My 2011 P Ion is 30k mls and still seems as good as the day i bought it 31/2yrs ago at 14k. However it has only been used for urban shopping type trips (for which it is superb) but more importantly in my opinion it has only been charged on a granny cable except for a few times and never left full or empty. My honest estimate of range is winter 55-65mls and summer 65-75mls subject to all the usual caveats.
 

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Anyone who is contemplating the purchase of a Mitsubishi i-MiEV ( or the Citroen/Peugeot clones ) may be interested to know that a dealer in Edinburgh - Longstone Ltd. - has 6 of them for sale.
They are all 2011, white, one owner: North Lanarkshire Council.
Interesting. I live in North Lanarkshire and have never seen any white i-Miev's driving around, so they can't have been using them much...
Mileage is low, most are less than 20K, one is 12K and one is 30K. Asking prices £5295 to £5695. Many have new tyres, discs, pads, 12v battery. Significantly, all have been undersealed. ( Having just put my 2012 Ion through an MOT, I wish it had been ! )
From the MOT history of the disclosed registration numbers ( SL11WKY, SL11ZRC, SL11WLA ), they have not been used for the past 2 years.
Hopefully they've not been left sitting either fully charged or discharged. :( I would certainly be putting Canion on them before considering a purchase especially 2011 models like mine was with the older cells.

If they were left to sit for long enough for the 12v battery to fully discharge (there is no auto-top up of the 12v battery) and remain flat for more than a month the BMS may have lost record of the true Ah capacity of the battery. If Canion says near 45.8Ah I would be suspicious. :)
 

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I Wonder how the batteries are doing on the early ones you have found up for sale. I Started off my EV life with a 11 Plate iOn which I got rid of about 5 years ago now. At that point my SOH Was in the low 80's from memory. Really hope the degradation has slowed down a bit or that mine was just a bad example as the batteries were already tiny to start with before you add in any significant amount of wear, especially in winter where you need the heater running.
My 2011 Ion in 2017 at 28k miles was at 86% SoH, by the time I sold it 3 months ago at 62k miles it was down to 70% SoH. And that was after I had already replaced 3 rapidly failing cells the year before. :(

To be fair it was pushed hard with 12k miles a year and was discharged to near empty every day in winter as the winter range was just barely enough to get me home. (In the last winter I had to stop and rapid charge every night on the way as the degradation had pushed the winter range below my commute)

I don't have proof but I think the cells couldn't handle the regular deep discharge and I recommend that people don't buy EV's with a battery small enough that they are deeply discharging it on a regular basis as it is very harmful to the cells.
 

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I think there is quite a variation on battery condition when you get to 2011 models depending on how they have been used and charged.

My 2011 P Ion is 30k mls and still seems as good as the day i bought it 31/2yrs ago at 14k. However it has only been used for urban shopping type trips (for which it is superb) but more importantly in my opinion it has only been charged on a granny cable except for a few times and never left full or empty. My honest estimate of range is winter 55-65mls and summer 65-75mls subject to all the usual caveats.
I don't think rapid charging hurts the battery in these cars as they have active cooling for rapid charging. It's nearly impossible to get the cells past 40C even after multiple rapid charges in a row. For one or two rapid charges they barely get over 30C. I did very little rapid charging on my Ion until near the end where the degradation forced me to rapid charge on the way home from work in the winter. So by the time I started doing regular rapid charging the degradation had already occurred.

It's deeply discharging the cells on a regular basis which really hurts them, which because it's such a small battery, is easy to do. If you only do short runs and don't deeply discharge they will probably last better.

Having said that at 30k miles your car is still at a very low cycle count - my battery was OK at 30k miles as well. (Still around 86% SoH) However the SoH reached a sharp inflexion point at around 40k miles where the degradation rate went up by a factor of about 3. From a bit of research online I'm not the only person who saw the degradation rate on one of these cars go up rapidly past around 40k miles. I really don't think the early LEV50 cells are very robust. They just don't have the cycle life endurance needed to do a high mileage on such a small capacity battery pack.

The jury is still out on the updated LEV50N cells used in late 2012 onwards cars - I've not really seen any data to confirm or disprove them lasting longer as Mitsubishi claims. To do a major revision of the cells so soon (2 years) into production suggests that they were well aware the earlier cells weren't lasting well enough. Personally in hindsight I would avoid an early car with LEV50 cells, and even at the time I bought it I was a little hesitant but the later ones were just too expensive at the time.

I would also avoid buying one of these cars with the intention of putting a high yearly mileage onto it. Great for a little runabout to do the shopping etc, but not suited for day in day out long distance commutes like I was subjecting it to.
 

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Yeah, I seem to recall the main selling point of the 'N' upgrade was longer life when deeply discharged. To be fair, it was more like three years—production started in mid-2009, so the MY2013 factory changeover would have happened in mid-2012.

It's perhaps significant that the 80s LEV40-equipped Outlander's PHEV-ECU was coded to avoid discharging below 25%, warn the driver at ~20% and shut down at ~17% (from memory). I don't know if LEV40 has the revised 'N' chemistry or not—I've always assumed it does, because of the timeline (but you know what can happen when you ass-u-me).
 

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It's perhaps significant that the 80s LEV40-equipped Outlander's PHEV-ECU was coded to avoid discharging below 25%, warn the driver at ~20% and shut down at ~17% (from memory). I don't know if LEV40 has the revised 'N' chemistry or not—I've always assumed it does, because of the timeline (but you know what can happen when you ass-u-me).
The Ion doesn't report tortoise mode until the raw SoC is down to about 10% (depends a little on how much degradation) and will let you keep driving right down to 0% albeit at reduced power... I guess the range is so short to begin with they didn't think they could afford a larger buffer.
 

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A higher mileage EV that's been used continuously is much less of a risk. I'd think they're going to cost the dealer a lot in repairs.

I bet they'll end up as trade sales and not retail.
 

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I paid £4k for an iOn in a private sale earlier this year so I would be surprised if the dealer finds it particularly easy to sell these at £5300 and above. Perhaps with a bit of haggling, the real sale price will come down to a fair market price.
 

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Got £4000 for my 62k mile 2011 Ion as a trade in so a much lower mileage one (which will almost certainly have much better SoH) should fetch significantly more especially when all 2nd hand EV's are in short supply.
 
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