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Hi, anyone had this issue. Our supply to the meter comes from a 16mm 2 core which is max rated to 60amp. UKPN say it cannot be upgraded to 80 or 100a
 

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Some homes are like that. The feed is set by the size of the incomer, so while that can be upgraded, it will cost thousands as the DNO will have to dig up cable or run a new line just for your property.

Do you need two 32A chargers? Could you accomodate two chargers with a 20-24A current limit?
 

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Hi, anyone had this issue. Our supply to the meter comes from a 16mm 2 core which is max rated to 60amp. UKPN say it cannot be upgraded to 80 or 100a
I just had UKPN replace my fuse from 60A to 80A - but were not confident to up-rate to 100A as they did not have any plans for my area!

That said - my attending DNO engineer did mention that the main cut-out fuse is rated for 1.5 times their printed limit - but over a long period. So it would cope with 90A for a matter of days / weeks before the fuse would actually blow.

Charger installers do seem to be good at looking at your current property usage and factoring that into the diversity of your power usage. Depends on what else in your home can take a lot of energy - things like some cooking appliances, electric / power showers can be hungry. I have an 8.5KW elec shower so would have to be careful that being on at same time as EV charging at 7KW, and cooking for example.

There are chargers out there which can diversify the charge throughput to your car based on current coming into your property. An example of this is the MyEnergi Zappi. If you are charging at 7KW and have a sudden current inrush, the Zappi can throttle the charging of your car down to a lower level until that period passes.

So in short - need not be the end of the world, If you must have 7KW charging speed, then there are chargers that can monitor load and adjust. Otherwise you could just limit your charger down to an appropriate current (i.e. Max is 20A vs. 32A).
 

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My pod point has a monitor on the whole house usage, so that if it gets over 60A the pod point will draw less power to keep the house consumption under 60A. The installers were very good, they said this 60A monitor enables them to fit chargers where they otherwise wouldnt be able to. Maybe have a look at pod point.

Cheers.
 

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With a 100A incomer, there is no need for load shedding. Diversity would easily keep you within the limits of that incomer - you'd have to have two cars charging fully + electric shower/cooker switched on full to reach that type of limit. And those fuses are okay with brief overloads of around 30 minutes or so.
 

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Interesting - we had a Pod Point installed 21 months ago and there is no sign of this feature (although our incomer is 100 Amps). Where do they install the sensor - at the meter or the consumer unit?
There is a wire that comes from the pod point to a little clamp around the positive (brown) wire from the meter. The clamp is like one you get with one of those electricity monitor displays.

Cheers.

124585
 

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Just this morning our DNO upgraded our main fuse from 80A to 100A. Interestingly we had our second 32A chargepoint installed a couple of years ago (before I knew what questions to ask), so I guess the installer didn't check the main fuse rating or with the DNO before the install? Or maybe he did? We already had a 40A shower too.

Luckily both our EV's only pull 16A; I got 32A chargepoints for futureproofing. Plus I only charge overnight when nothing else is being used.

At least with this upgrade I can stop thinking about it!

Oh, and the DNO guy said he's doing a lot of fuse upgrades at the moment. Lots of people doing the same I guess. It will only get worse as the population switch to EV's (and heat pumps).
 

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Just this morning our DNO upgraded our main fuse from 80A to 100A. Interestingly we had our second 32A chargepoint installed a couple of years ago (before I knew what questions to ask), so I guess the installer didn't check the main fuse rating or with the DNO before the install? Or maybe he did? We already had a 40A shower too.

Luckily both our EV's only pull 16A; I got 32A chargepoints for futureproofing. Plus I only charge overnight when nothing else is being used.

At least with this upgrade I can stop thinking about it!

Oh, and the DNO guy said he's doing a lot of fuse upgrades at the moment. Lots of people doing the same I guess. It will only get worse as the population switch to EV's (and heat pumps).
Your install is non-compliant as diversity cannot be applied to the chargepoint supplies. So your 40A shower plus 2x32A chargepoints require 104A, thereby exceeding your supply capacity even after your fuse upgrade before allowing anything else at the property. Unless the existing chargepoints can be internally set to only run at 16A then the second chargepoint should not have been installed without a fail safe method to prevent supply overload with DNO approval. While you currently cannot utilise the full capacity of your chargers it is not compliant to simply manually manage the situation - if and when you move the new owner may know nothing about how to manage the power at the house to avoid overload.

I was in exactly the same position with a 100A supply, all electric heating, a 40A electric shower that is only used as a backup etc and never anywhere near my 100A max supply capacity. The installer of my second chargepoint immediately flagged the need for suitable kos management and DNO approval before he could proceed (in my case the second chargepoint was a Zappi with load management configured).
 

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Your install is non-compliant as diversity cannot be applied to the chargepoint supplies. So your 40A shower plus 2x32A chargepoints require 104A, thereby exceeding your supply capacity even after your fuse upgrade before allowing anything else at the property. Unless the existing chargepoints can be internally set to only run at 16A then the second chargepoint should not have been installed without a fail safe method to prevent supply overload with DNO approval. While you currently cannot utilise the full capacity of your chargers it is not compliant to simply manually manage the situation - if and when you move the new owner may know nothing about how to manage the power at the house to avoid overload.

I was in exactly the same position with a 100A supply, all electric heating, a 40A electric shower that is only used as a backup etc and never anywhere near my 100A max supply capacity. The installer of my second chargepoint immediately flagged the need for suitable kos management and DNO approval before he could proceed (in my case the second chargepoint was a Zappi with load management configured).
One of the chargepoints is a Zappi. I'll have to check if it has load management enabled, and if not enable it!
 
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