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2020 BMW i3S 120Ah BEV
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For sure if you then add heavy accelerations on top of that it causes more wear, but how much?
Approximately proportional. ;)

I acknowledge that stating it's "proportional" is an over-simplification, for a given wheel/tyre/car it's not a million miles from the truth, given that a pair of tyres on the back of my front wheel drive car last 50,000 miles (and in fact usually gets replaced due to age rather than tread wear), but an identical pair on the front last 8,000 miles I think it's borne out that G-force dominates wear rate over straighforward rolling/flexing.
 

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I'm not crazy, the attack has begun.
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Approximately proportional. ;)

I acknowledge that stating it's "proportional" is an over-simplification, for a given wheel/tyre/car it's not a million miles from the truth, given that a pair of tyres on the back of my front wheel drive car last 50,000 miles (and in fact usually gets replaced due to age rather than tread wear), but an identical pair on the front last 8,000 miles I think it's borne out that G-force dominates wear rate over straighforward rolling/flexing.
Accepted.

The engineering/mathematical way to say this is that wear rate is an increasing function* of g-loading, and you have then liberated the expression to mean anything where one goes up the other goes up. If it were the other way you'd say is a decreasing function of.

*(for a function y=f(x), dx/dy>0 for all x)

HTH! ;)
 
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