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I’ve owned a new 62 kwh Leaf+ for nearly two months and just returned from a successful long road trip (family holiday). Because of battery gate I wonder if the Leaf is a bit unfairly maligned in some quarters regarding rapid charging, so thought I might report on my experience to offer a positive view.



We drove from County Durham to Devon in a day (400 miles), spent a week in the Westcountry before returning. On the way south, both rapid top-ups (Derby and Bristol) were at 40+ kwh. I accidentally ended the second one early and the unit wouldn’t restart again (Ecotricity) so decided on a third top-up at Exeter. Only Exeter services was busy and the Polar unit at Exeter racecourse was blocked (locked entrance gate, very annoying). The guessometer said 36 miles range for a 32 mile journey to Plymouth so we cut the speed back to 50 mph to rein in a few extra miles. The third rapid charge of the day in Plymouth was restricted by the car to about 20 kwh with the battery temp. icon showing approx. three quarters fully hot. Plymouth isn’t brilliantly endowed with EV chargers, but I was able to start the home journey (a week later) with a full charge. We only required rapid top-ups at Bristol and Derby again and both were close to full speed. So my very non-scientific finding is that on a warm summer day, driving at a constant 70mph (when traffic allows), it’s only the third rapid charge that is restricted by the car somewhat.



In terms of range, the journey south into a slight headwind, gave the equivalent of just under 200 miles per full charge and just above 200 heading back north with a similar wind behind. Most driving was on the propilot at 70 mph so the range was a pleasant surprise, especially as aircon was used from time to time too. The propilot is great and really does help with driver fatigue and I appreciated the e-pedal on narrow Devon lanes properly for the first time too.



So, all in all, a lovely holiday and a very positive EV experience. Of course, my Leaf+ ownership is still very early days, but I do think it’s a good car and definitely a match for ICEs on longer journeys. More dealerships are pricing it below £30k, which means it compares very favourably with the similar ranged Kias and Hyundais. I hope more prospective buyers are attracted to it.
 

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2019 Leaf 40
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The third charge being slow is the same on the 40.

200 motorway miles at actual motorway speeds is reasonable for most people.

£30k for one is far more sensible. I don't know what Nissan were thinking trying to sell them for base model 3 money. It was deluded.
 

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Leaf 62 a match for ICE on long journeys? Really?

And as above this really is a well under 30k car, trying to get anything near price of the vastly superior M3 SR+ is an insult to the customer.

I have a 30 and a 40 ok good enough cars but the Leaf is what it is,,, outdated.
I am glad you like the car and it suits you but for me those charging speeds after those miles are unacceptable in a modern EV.
As we are planning long road trips in Europe i require 3 things, consistent good charging speed, CCS, and Supercharger access.
 

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How long did you spend on each charge? If you want to do 10-80% that will be over an hour at 40kW and over two hours at 20kW.

Even if you only need to charge once it's a shame you are limited to 40kW, not even the 50kW that 50kW chargers offer. If it was 50kW from 10-80% it would be pretty good.

For occasional long trips that's okay, especially if you only paid £30k for it. But I think srichards is right, if you paid £40k, more than an e-Niro or Kona, you would be very disappointed with that. Or if you needed to do a lot of long journeys.
 

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When you purchase anything, it's always a compromise, it's impossible to have everything, what you have to do is get a pencil and paper and work out what your priorities are. Its the same when purchasing a vehicle, we all know the LEAF is outdated but for a lot of folks it's a great buy.

The build quality and the quality of the mechanical components of the LEAF are top rate, plus it's roomy and quiet, at £30K, the 62Kwh offers really good value but it is compromised if you want to do over 300 miles in a day, because the battery doesn't have active battery cooling. if anybody is not happy with that, then it's not suitable, so don't buy it.

I had a 40Kwh and traded it in for a 62Kwh and where the battery overheated in the 40Kwh, the 62Kwh handles the battery temperature so much better in that you can cruise 70mph and not worry about the battery heat. The battery only heats up on rapid charging and will take 2 rapid charges before rapidgate, that s well over 300 miles range in a day. Like I say that's good enough for most folks, if that doesn't fit in with your lifestyle then don't buy it, but don't slag the LEAF off, it is what it is, we all know what it is and it's compromised and old fashioned, it's all been done to death, folks are still buying it though and getting on okay with it.

Also remember that all the other EV's out there are compromised as well - TESLA with poor paint and build quality and unreliable components - lack of rear hatch. - Hyundai and Kia having to have motors replacements. - MG ZS lack of scheduled charging, I could go on and on, so please cut the poor old LEAF some slack.

It would also like to thank @DuRam for going to the time and trouble to post a report on the recent trip in 62Kwh, for the benefit of others, a positive report of his pleasure that his choice of vehicle had proved correct and that it was meeting his expectations and in turn it will help others to make a purchase decision. I can only apologise to him for the wall of negativity created, hoping that @DuRam is not disheartened and continues to come back with future reports.
 

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Much depends if the car can be charged at the destination before return home, hence saving a rapid charge, (maybe saving 2 rapid charge if car used while at destination)
 

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I agree wholeheartedly with the sentiments of Gosport Dave above. Call me old fashioned but simply cutting back the speed to 62-65mph would ensure at least 200 miles (if not more) on a 62kwh leaf. Schedule rapid chargers at 190-200 mile intervals, and one should easily be able to get to circa 550-600 miles in the day before having to encounter any kind of rapid gate. Just make sure to leave with a 100% battery!

I agree the lack of CCS if wanting to do European road trips may be a concern for some, however just looking at plugshare/chargemap, shows plenty of chargers around for Chademo. There is also a distinct legacy advantage to having Chademo in the uk so there is a lot going for the 62kwh leaf IMO.
 

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I think your experience shows the 62kWh Leaf would suit the majority of drivers for the majority of the time. However, it also illustrates how Nissan seem to have squandered their advantage over the competition by failing to develop their original product and innovate.

You mention the similar range of Hyundais and Kias but our Kona has never gone below 220 miles of range in 30k miles whatever the weather and despite us mainly hammering up and down motorways. We always use the air con or heater for the entire journey. When we need rapids we don't experience throttling. We emerge after long journeys without ever having back ache.

In short, running the Kona means we don't have to compromise. When we wanted to replace our Leaf 30, the then Leaf 40 wasn't the step up we wanted and while the 62 has addressed the range it still hasn't moved the game on.

I'm not saying the 62 is a bad car. It drives well, is pretty well built, spacious and has good driver assistance features. Due to discounts it also now enjoys a considerable price advantage over the Kona, but it is disappointing that it is fundamentally still the same car as our enjoyable but compromised 2016 Leaf which was barely different to the previous model introduced in 2010.
 

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Yes the Leaf is indeed a good solid car, both of mine have been faultless and when i got the 40 i could not bring myself to sell my 30 so kept that too.
I did test drive a 62 before i got my 40 but the price difference made me choose the 40 which was 23k where as the 62 was 29.5 k.
Both my examples here.
 

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I’ve owned a new 62 kwh Leaf+ for nearly two months and just returned from a successful long road trip (family holiday). Because of battery gate I wonder if the Leaf is a bit unfairly maligned in some quarters regarding rapid charging, so thought I might report on my experience to offer a positive view.



We drove from County Durham to Devon in a day (400 miles), spent a week in the Westcountry before returning. On the way south, both rapid top-ups (Derby and Bristol) were at 40+ kwh. I accidentally ended the second one early and the unit wouldn’t restart again (Ecotricity) so decided on a third top-up at Exeter. Only Exeter services was busy and the Polar unit at Exeter racecourse was blocked (locked entrance gate, very annoying). The guessometer said 36 miles range for a 32 mile journey to Plymouth so we cut the speed back to 50 mph to rein in a few extra miles. The third rapid charge of the day in Plymouth was restricted by the car to about 20 kwh with the battery temp. icon showing approx. three quarters fully hot. Plymouth isn’t brilliantly endowed with EV chargers, but I was able to start the home journey (a week later) with a full charge. We only required rapid top-ups at Bristol and Derby again and both were close to full speed. So my very non-scientific finding is that on a warm summer day, driving at a constant 70mph (when traffic allows), it’s only the third rapid charge that is restricted by the car somewhat.



In terms of range, the journey south into a slight headwind, gave the equivalent of just under 200 miles per full charge and just above 200 heading back north with a similar wind behind. Most driving was on the propilot at 70 mph so the range was a pleasant surprise, especially as aircon was used from time to time too. The propilot is great and really does help with driver fatigue and I appreciated the e-pedal on narrow Devon lanes properly for the first time too.



So, all in all, a lovely holiday and a very positive EV experience. Of course, my Leaf+ ownership is still very early days, but I do think it’s a good car and definitely a match for ICEs on longer journeys. More dealerships are pricing it below £30k, which means it compares very favourably with the similar ranged Kias and Hyundais. I hope more prospective buyers are attracted to it.
Thank you for this post, it is appreciated by myself and the majority of those on this forum and those who are looking in, with regards to making an informed decision .

I am pleased that your trip went well and reporting a positive outcome regarding the 62Kwh LEAF, which hopefully is reassuring that you decision to purchase the LEAF 62Kwh, has been vindicated.

I too have a 62Kwh LEAF which I have had for several months, a couple of weeks ago we did our first real a road trip from where I live in Gosport to Harrogate, about 270 miles distance. Starting off on a full charge, had a 45 minute charge at Cherwell Services, being early on a Sunday morning, the roads were really quiet and was able to drive with the pilot set at 73mph for most of the motorway. Pulled into Ferrybridge Services for 30 minutes for a top up to ensure sufficient miles on the GOM for the next day.

The trip was 270 miles and took 6 hours including the charging stops.

Came back the following Thursday and more traffic hold ups, stopped off at Leicester Forest East for 45 minutes and Cherwell services again for 20 minutes (would have stayed longer but quite a queue was building up after we arrived and only 1 EH charger is working there) - arrived home with plenty range to spare.

Averaged 3.1 miles / Kw on the way up and 3.4 miles / Kw on the return trip. (more up hill going and down hill coming back)

I upgraded from the 40Kwh so obviously I keep keep comparing the 40Kwh with the 62Kwh, the main observations are that the 62Kwh with the extra weight is better planted on the road at 70mph. The 40Kwh tended to drift in lane especially when windy, the 62Kwh is rock sold and only moves in response the moving the steering wheel.

With the extra power, the 62Kwh wafts along at 70 mph in a relaxed serene manner and the pilot seems to have had the software tweaked with the auto steer being better behaved, it keeps the car arrow straight between the lines and seems to cope with corners much better to a point hat I now have confidence in it that I didn't have before.

Good trip both ways and arrived comfortable and relaxed in fact you feel like you don't want it to end, you just want to keep driving. All positives no negatives.



"but I do think it’s a good car and definitely a match for ICEs on longer journeys. More dealerships are pricing it below £30k, which means it compares very favourably with the similar ranged Kias and Hyundais. I hope more prospective buyers are attracted to it."
[/QUOTE]


Speaking objectively, your EV like my own does everything that an ICE would do and therefore is a match for an ICE but in reality EV's in general have a long way to come in matching the convenience of filling a tank with diesel or petrol and having 600 mile range at ones disposal.

Like wise in fairness it is difficult to compare the efficiency and range of the LEAF 62Kwh with that of Hyundai's and KIA's efficiency and range as there is no getting away from it, they are super efficient.

Your happy with the efficiency and range of the 62Kwh, I am happy with the efficiency and range of the 62Kwh, most folks will be happy with the efficiency and range, so that all that really matters.

Just as long as more folk get into EV's and emissions are cut to lockdown levels and prevents kids of the future suffering with asthma.

Please keep posting your exploits, it's what makes this forum so good.
 

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2019 Leaf 40
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Is the miles per kWh the same in the 60 as the 40 under identical conditions?

Propilot in my 40 is hopeless. It's prone to tramlining too which makes it generally a bit more wobbly.
 

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How long did you spend on each charge? If you want to do 10-80% that will be over an hour at 40kW and over two hours at 20kW.

Even if you only need to charge once it's a shame you are limited to 40kW, not even the 50kW that 50kW chargers offer. If it was 50kW from 10-80% it would be pretty good.

For occasional long trips that's okay, especially if you only paid £30k for it. But I think srichards is right, if you paid £40k, more than an e-Niro or Kona, you would be very disappointed with that. Or if you needed to do a lot of long journeys.
Apparently, on the new Polar CM 150kw chargers they have Chademo at up 100kw. I think there are a couple of ZapMap entries where someone with a Leaf got up to 70kw on them.
 

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Is the miles per kWh the same in the 60 as the 40 under identical conditions?

Propilot in my 40 is hopeless. It's prone to tramlining too which makes it generally a bit more wobbly.
The miles per Kwh in the 62Kwh compared to the 40Kwh tend to be about 10% worse - non motorway summertime the 62 averages out at 4.2Kw's / mile where the 40 would achieve easily 4.8Kw's / mile.

A continuous 70mph in the gets 3.1Kw's / mile in the 62, where as the 40 would be about 3.4Kw's / mile although the 40 didn't like a continuous 70mph very much so didn't do it very often.

This was the first time I have used the auto steer in the 62 and really chalk and cheese compared the 40 - really held the lines well especially on corners, very little weaving, the 40 always felt like it trying to steer into the right hand lane and came back at the last second, didn't instil confidence. Also I thought that it picked up the lines quicker when you indicate to move lanes the pick up automatically switch off, when back in lane it picks the lines up really quickly, where as before is used to take an age.

The improvements are software based so should be available to all LEAF's.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Some interesting replies here folks, and thank you Gosport Dave for your supportive comments especially. I did start the thread because I want there to be some Leaf positivity out there for potential new buyers and feel that some with an anti-EV agenda, or perhaps some who simply compare the Leaf to the very best (Tesla) might end up bringing about its obsoletion if not careful because others will be put off. It is a good car and at the right price will sell well. EVs take a while to get into the consciousness of many drivers and examples of such as the i3 or the eGolf show that the market exists perhaps longer than the manufacturers predict. If people get behind the Leaf, it will get a foothold and though seasoned EV drivers might see it as ‘old fashioned’ the vast majority of the public rightly won’t.


I would have preferred a Tesla and was following their prices for about a year. But for the same range I couldn’t justify (or afford) the extra third. Yes it has better battery management and charging opportunities, but not that much better to justify it. Nor does Tesla have a presence between Leeds and Edinburgh. So midway through lockdown when I realised that the Leaf e+ didn’t actually cost £36k (the Tekna list price) I started to take an interest. Many reviews say ‘good car but not worth the same as a Model 3’, so I just want to do my bit to put it out there that it doesn’t cost anything like the Tesla and so the compromises are worth it; two long drives have proved that to me. Maybe I’m stretching it a bit to say that it is a match for ICEs on repeated long journeys, but it doesn’t fall anywhere near as short as some would have us believe.


To answer a couple of questions that have been raised, I was generalising a bit when I said it charged in the 40s kwh. I don’t know for sure, but it read 42 at one point when I looked. On the drive back my first top-up was just under an hour and the second one just over. Neither extended the stops especially and I chose the second location specifically in order to call in and see a relative while it charged; I think EV drivers do this, they learn how treat journeys and usage a bit differently. We did actually have a third stop for the loo an hour from home, but didn’t need to charge there.


The propilot worked very well, no zig-zagging or tram linining and genuinely made the miles easier. It’s a high spec toy. I also think the whole infotainment set-up is decent; not as good as a high end Beamer apparently, but then I wouldn’t know. I mirrored Google maps (a personal preference, I like its dynamism) using Android Auto and avoided an M42 hold-up through it.


It may not have the cache of the Tesla nor quite the range of the Korean models (they are great cars by the way, I have no problem with any EV) but the Leaf e+ is a very good alternative, not old fashioned to most drivers and a chunk cheaper. I wish Nissan wasn’t giving up longer term on Chademo but it’s definitely a car worthy of consideration (British made too, isn’t that worth something in these times?). It also cost half as much to fuel as my wife’s Juke; we took two cars, it was a big family holiday!


By the way, my top-up charge in Derby was suburban and whilst there I noticed a nearby house had its own Chademo charger, complete with heavy-duty cables. I once read a U.S. Tesla owner having one but didn’t really know they were a thing, not in this country anyway.


Anway, back to the plot. Nissan Leaf e+. Very pleased, good car increasing to very good at the right price.
 

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Interesting to read people’s views on the leaf plus. I have got over 7000 miles on my leaf plus and enjoy driving the car because it suits my life style.

After over 20000 miles in a leaf 40 which I would describe as an electric car. The leaf plus is a great car that just happens to be powered by electricity.

Both cars easily rapid charge at over 40 kW per hour so that claim seems odd as it doesn’t relate to my actual cars.

My best fuel economy was at +20 degrees Celsius in Holland giving over 5 miles per kw worst was +8 degrees Celsius in winds and driving rain in UK at 3.2 miles per KW. That is my driving style please note previous diesel cars have shown same variation of fuel consumption.

With this car I don’t need rapid chargers within 80 miles of where I live which is a different mind set to the old days of fossil fuel.

I like to buy my fuel in 32 to 35 kWh sessions to load 50% of the battery. Fastest charge was 24 minutes to load up so that must be over 60 kWh per hour on a 50kw charger. It was a one off it’s usually 30 to 45 minutes.

My charging sessions suit my coffee and toilet habits and are not restricted by the vehicle.

My car will happily take three 50% charges in a journey usually first is 40 minutes second 30 minutes third 40 minutes. Give or take a few minutes.

I don’t want to drive more than 500 miles in a day that’s my limit not the car. It’s a comfortable pleasant journey that we enjoy that’s by choice not the cars limitation.

Just buy a car to suit your life style and go out and enjoy it.
 

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We got our e+ last summer as PCP in 30kW Leaf was ending and it was a natural choice for us. The difference with 30kW is enormous and I am not going to repeat the positives that were mentioned here earlier as well as some negatives, which exist in all cars. Speaking of which, I will be unoriginal and say that although I like M3 as a driver coz I had it for a few days as a test drive, I wouldn't buy it as a family car. There are only two amazing tangible benefits for Tesla: charging aspect and dynamics. All else is very subjective and I have a strong feeling that Tesla's aura of futurism made a lot of people close their eyes on small negatives that in other cars (like Leaf) would be considered "bad".
For instance, their fake leather seats are comfy until you get a sweaty back and that is VERY uncomfortable.
M3 has a large boot until you try and put smth like a bedside unit in it. Not being a hatchback puts limitations on what you can actually put in. We dont live in a world of holidays and suitcases as the only cargo to carry.
The screen is superb, but try and drive on a motorway with yoghurt all over it because of your toddler. I know it is a very personal experience and wont likely happen to anyone else, but over reliance on a single unit for all controls has its negatives.
Autopilot in the UK will not be available in the foreseeable future, while Propilot in Leaf is at least as good as driving assistance in M3...
By no means I am saying that e+ is better than Tesla. Maybe it is not, but it also costs less and suits my lifestyle more.
 

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Fastest charge was 24 minutes to load up so that must be over 60 kWh per hour on a 50kw charger.
I don't disagree with your post, it's a great car. A lot of people seem to get confused about kW and kWh though. If you have a 50kW charger than the most energy you can put in is 50kW per hour, or 50kWh.

The Leaf 62 seems to charge at about 45kW up to 75% and then slows down, best case with a 50kW charger. It's something like 140 MPH. I agree that's completely fine for most people.
 

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The new "ULTRA" Chargers (Like the ones below in Ripon) (125Amp CHAdeMO) the LEAF 62 will charge at 47.5Kw's up to 70% SOC and doesn't drop below 36Kw's all the way up to 90% SOC, providing the battery temperature doesn't go above 44°c. Making it easy to take on 40 + Kw's in an hour, once the battery temperature goes above 44°c the charge rate drops to 18 - 20Kw's (Rapidgate) then one is stuffed.

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