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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well I have finally got a Leaf for 7days. Already impressed especially with the acceleration in normal mode. Drives like a dream as well. Just a few questions.

1. Does putting it into "neutral" when at traffic lights or held in queues improve range? Do people just leave their foot on the footbrake?

2. Are there any must do's whilst I have it. I intend to go up onto the North Yorkshire moors at the weekend from Hull to test it and my bottle! There is very little charging infrastructure here! I intend a Hull to Scarborough commute of 70 miles and would like to do it without charging.

3. Still want one for Christmas depending on how the test goes.

Any advice appreciated,

Many thanks.
 

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I always put it into neutral as otherwise you are dazzling the driver behind with your brake lights. And, of course, those lights use precious electrons!

70 miles is achievable in good weather conditions, but I think it takes a while for your driving style to adapt to get the best mileage out of a Leaf. Also, I would think that there would be a fair few hills in the Scarborough area. I know Hull is very flat but you might get a bit nervous towards the end of your journey.
 

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You have rapid at nissan hull (free), pod point (2 car parks, need a card) and free chargers (2x3pin and blue commando) at St Stephens shopping centre and you're saying very little of charging infrastructure in Hull? It may be more chargers now, I said just what I know since summer:) somebody mentioned type 2 charger in Scarborough before here in forums. Is it 3.3kw or 6.6kw your Leaf?
 

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Sounds good.

70 miles should be fine if you keep your speed down to about 50-55 and it isn't too hilly... "not too hilly" doesn't sound like the Yorkshire Moors! I wouldn't say it was at all certain you'll make it especially if the temperature is below 10C.

However, regardless, I would recommend that you do charge if you possibly can even for an hour. It will remove any anxiety and will make sure you don't run out.

Just remember... when the Low Battery Warning (LBW) sounds you have about 20% of your total range remaining... when the Very Low Battery Warning (VLBW) sounds you have about 10% of your total range remaining.

So...
  • Always zero your trip meter before you set out so you know how far you have gone since you last charged
  • Then, as a rough guide... when the LBW sounds look at the trip meter and take a quarter of the distance you have travelled so far since charging and that is a rough estimate of how far you might be able to go given the same speed and hills as you have had so far
  • Immediately zero the trip meter at the LBW
  • Then, when the VLBW sounds look at the trip meter again and as a rough guide you should plan on going no further than the distance shown.
However, don't push your luck once the VLBW sounds... look for somewhere safe to stop, ideally somewhere you can charge, but in any case somewhere you could be recovered by a flat-bed truck if needed. It shouldn't come to that if you do manage to charge somewhere for an hour or two on route.

These are rough guides to help but for you to get close to these estimates it assumes that you started out at 100% and it requires that your speed and the hills be pretty much the same as what you have encountered prior to the LBW/VLBW. If you come across a steep, long hill unexpectedly or drive faster then you won't go anything like as far. The worst scenario is that you have a steep/long hill at the end of your trip and that would require you to reduce the post LBW/VLBW estimates by half or even less.

The thing about it is that, if you do buy, then over the first few weeks you will get used to what the car can and can't do and you will have more confidence. For now I would recommend that you don't take too many risks... find a place to charge on route if you possibly can. No one is a hero trying to make it without charging and running out is not a pleasant experience and even if you charge you will still get a good feeling as to whether you would have made it or not had you not charged. It just takes away the risk.

People do occasionally run out but it is rare... people might do it once and seldom do it again because generally there is no need. Charge when you can until you get to know the car and how far you can go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sounds good.

70 miles should be fine if you keep your speed down to about 50-55 and it isn't too hilly... "not too hilly" doesn't sound like the Yorkshire Moors! I wouldn't say it was at all certain you'll make it especially if the temperature is below 10C.

However, regardless, I would recommend that you do charge if you possibly can even for an hour. It will remove any anxiety and will make sure you don't run out.

Just remember... when the Low Battery Warning (LBW) sounds you have about 20% of your total range remaining... when the Very Low Battery Warning (VLBW) sounds you have about 10% of your total range remaining.

So...
  • Always zero your trip meter before you set out so you know how far you have gone since you last charged
  • Then, as a rough guide... when the LBW sounds look at the trip meter and take a quarter of the distance you have travelled so far since charging and that is a rough estimate of how far you might be able to go given the same speed and hills as you have had so far
  • Immediately zero the trip meter at the LBW
  • Then, when the VLBW sounds look at the trip meter again and as a rough guide you should plan on going no further than the distance shown.
However, don't push your luck once the VLBW sounds... look for somewhere safe to stop, ideally somewhere you can charge, but in any case somewhere you could be recovered by a flat-bed truck if needed. It shouldn't come to that if you do manage to charge somewhere for an hour or two on route.

These are rough guides to help but for you to get close to these estimates it assumes that you started out at 100% and it requires that your speed and the hills be pretty much the same as what you have encountered prior to the LBW/VLBW. If you come across a steep, long hill unexpectedly or drive faster then you won't go anything like as far. The worst scenario is that you have a steep/long hill at the end of your trip and that would require you to reduce the post LBW/VLBW estimates by half or even less.

The thing about it is that, if you do buy, then over the first few weeks you will get used to what the car can and can't do and you will have more confidence. For now I would recommend that you don't take too many risks... find a place to charge on route if you possibly can. No one is a hero trying to make it without charging and running out is not a pleasant experience and even if you charge you will still get a good feeling as to whether you would have made it or not had you not charged. It just takes away the risk.

People do occasionally run out but it is rare... people might do it once and seldom do it again because generally there is no need. Charge when you can until you get to know the car and how far you can go.
Paul;
Thank you very much for this. It was exactly what I was looking for. I took the leaf out for a middle distance run tonight and was impressed. Had plenty of battery so just enjoyed myself. I can't believe how quick it is withall Eco modes off and how well it handles.
Still confident about the weekend.

My only question is what is b mode exactly and how do they get that ICE car feeling of breaking when you release the accelerator.

Regards
Andrew
 

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When you release your accelerator, your electric motor starts to work as a generator, it's regenerating. If your battery is full - you can get freewheeling, more or less.

B mode is an increased breaking using your regen. Some people don't like aggressive deceleration, so them are either driving on D, or eco. B might increase your range a lot especially if you have a lot of steep downhills.

Example of efficient usage of regen:

http://www.treehugger.com/cars/man-charges-leaf-electric-car-hawaiian-volcano-video.html
 

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I'm getting between 75 and 85 miles at the moment, at an indicated 70mph, depending on wind. This is with heating too - the past week I've just left the heater on at 20 degrees (the decadence!!).

If I slowed to an indicated 60 I'd probably be able to make it to work and back pretty easily. But if your terrain has more hills, you may want to consider slowing down even more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all your help. I went 40 miles on the first leg to my golf club near Scarborough. I used 50% battery and was all set to "risk" it home. I was then asked to give someone a lift home so decided to charge off a three pin plug whilst I played golf. 4 hours later it was fully charged. I know what you mean cjm. I had a lovely warm 55-60mph drive home with 50 miles range left. This will be my commute and I was confident I could make it back to Hull with 50% battery left.

Anyway. I have just bought a pre reg Acenta in white with 20 miles on the click and £12000 off the price. Here starts the adventure!!
 

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Thanks for all your help. I went 40 miles on the first leg to my golf club near Scarborough. I used 50% battery and was all set to "risk" it home. I was then asked to give someone a lift home so decided to charge off a three pin plug whilst I played golf. 4 hours later it was fully charged. I know what you mean cjm. I had a lovely warm 55-60mph drive home with 50 miles range left. This will be my commute and I was confident I could make it back to Hull with 50% battery left.

Anyway. I have just bought a pre reg Acenta in white with 20 miles on the click and £12000 off the price. Here starts the adventure!!
You won't look back!
 
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