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There's no written number but lots if speculation that it's 70%. If this guys experience is typical that's ~300,000 miles. He'll also still have ~185 miles range at that point!
 
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Thats mental when you think of it like that and with only 1 x moving part in the motor, what else is there to wear? I wonder if there will be many gas powered cars that can do that kind of mileage and still pretty much have the same acceleration that they had from new? from my experience with higher powered gas cars over the years...none.

Assuming that battery ageing is not significant then there will be a lot of life for a very long time in Teslas, I think that battery management is the key to battery life and this is why active thermal management is important, Nissan I think dont do it because they want to sell you either another battery or another car.

Repeated rapid charges with Leafs without significant periods of rest for cooling will shorten the life of the cells, some of the battery temps we have seen on the longer runs in the cars have been quite high, from my experience with Lipo this is one the real killers, this is why on my packs for all my other vehicles they are thermally managed and never charged when even warm.

Nice one Tesla...the others really need to play catch up.
 

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Sorry for the ignorance but what're Tesla doing that's so different?
active thermal management to keep the cells in a "happy place", and generally having lower C rates. For instance a Volt has 16.5kwh battery pack, and 111k can be drawn from it (6.7C) and while cruising at 70mph drawing about 20kw it is pulling 1.2C.
For an 85kwh Model S it can draw up to 310kw (3.6C) and cruising at 70mph using about 20kw is only 0.24C

Basically, it is kinder to it's batteries.
 
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