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Further treatment in an non-NHS hospital – the hospital is entitled to claim from the driver's insurance company up to the amount of £2949 for an in-patient and £295 for an out-patient.
The hospital will generally write to the patient to find out the details of the accident, in particular looking for the driver's name, address and insurance details and then they will deal with it from here.

The key words above are "up to". The amount varies from NHS Trust to Trust. The Government likes to think of this as a victimless "Robin Hood" tax, but of course we all end up paying it really inefficiently through our insurance premiums and with the wasteful bureaucratic systems in the NHS.
 

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I've heard Leaf's coming up the road behind me as I walk on the pavement and I can definitely hear the tyre noise quite easily at 20mph, it's quite noisy as is any car's tyres at that speed.

As to the original incident of this thread, since driving an EV (without a noise maker - 2011 model) I'm more aware and careful around pedestrians, however the only time that I feel there is genuinely an increased risk over an ICE is very slow manoeuvring around in shopping mall car parks, especially reversing.

Here I am super careful because people don't have the hint of an idling engine to clue them into the possibility that I might want to be reversing out of my space, and most people will freely wander behind a moving ICE in car parks let alone a silent EV waiting for a chance to move out. I've even sometimes had to open a window and ask people faffing around in an adjacent space to close their doors as I'm sitting there in reverse ready to move and they clearly aren't aware of this due to no idling engine.

However driving forwards on roads I genuinely don't think there is a significantly increased risk because at the speeds where real injuries will occur there is already enough tyre/road noise coming from the car to hear it coming, and as @donald points out some ICE's have very quiet engines at low speeds too. At very slow speeds like <10mph where the EV is significantly quieter you might bump someone but it's not going to be life threatening, and you probably have the reaction time to stop before hitting them anyway, provided you see them. (or emergency braking does it for you)

So I'm against the added noise pollution of EV-only legally binding noise producers <20mph, however, I think there may be a place for an audible but not-too-loud reversing sound on EV's. If nothing else it would signal to stray pedestrians in car parks that you have the intention of reversing if only they would get out of your way.... :p
I thought reversing noises are specifically banned in the UK on cars. Not sure why?
 

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Noise abatement as they would sound in built up areas at night and they don't trust car drivers to remember to use off switches like they do HGV drivers. o_O
Realistically the risk from being hit by a legally driven car in reverse is considered less than an HGV in the same situation.
 

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Sorry to hear this happened to you and good that pedestrian was OK. I was hit by car a few years ago and police asked me if I thought it was drivers fault, but in my case it wasn't. I was walking to middle of road (there was a hatched area) and was going to stop to let car pass, but slipped and fell into path of car... Public nearby were really helpfully and kind - sort of restored my faith in people.

Since getting the i3 I tend to be much more aware of pedestrians and assume that they may step off the pavement because they can't hear the car.
You know above about 15MPH it is very easy to hear an EV due to tyre noise? That said, pedestrians with headphones or zombie walking don't seem to hear any cars.
 

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Because the driver is always paying attention when in reverse, unlike when the car is going forward? :rolleyes:
More likely that LGVs always have huge blind spots whereas a car driver ought to be able to get a good view behind.
 

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Discussion Starter #48
I was quite careful about what I said to him over text message. I just wanted to know if he was ok.

I'm going to claim on my insurance, have the car fixed and then leave it to them to deal with the rest.

It's going to cost when I have to renew the cars but that's all part of driving. When you drive a car, you are always at risk of losing money and at risk of losing your life.
 

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The 2016 Soul had some reversing noise. I don't think any other EVs have.
Jaguar IPace has a bleep-type warning sound. Audi eTron doesn't. Can't answer for any others...
 

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Hmm. I think it will make a difference when it comes to paying the guy compensation.
It is all very confusing.
A dash cam is always good.
If someone steps out into the road without looking, it is their fault - always,
unless you are speeding, or drunk.
How can it be the driver's fault?
I assume he came between parked cars, as the driver was only doing 20 mph?
 

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If someone steps out into the road without looking, it is their fault - always,
unless you are speeding, or drunk.
Why does your state of sobriety or speed alleviate a pedestrian of any responsibility to look?

I will put that down to an odd turn of phrase.
 

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I had almost forgotten the incident I reported in post #39 but this has also reminded me of the need to document any event fully at the time. A year earlier I had been knocked off my motorcycle by a car emerging from a T junction under the classic SMIDSY ( Sorry mate I didn't see you ). I was an inexperienced driver back then and it was only by good luck that a witness came forward later to clear me from the drivers claim that I was speeding. I had failed to ask witnesses at the scene for their contact details.

After that, I bought a Halfords kit that contained a checklist of actions to take, a small pad of waterproof paper, and a crayon that would write in all circumstances. It also had a cardboard pre-loaded camera and a small torch.

As it happens I forgot that it was in the glove box at the time but the driver following me came forward as I was loading the kid in the car and handed me his business card, saying he saw it all and that if needed he would confirm the details.

I was glad about that later because I called round at the kids' house on the way home from work to check that he was OK. His father was quite aggressive but calmed down when I told him that I had a witness willing to confirm that the boy had just walked out into a stream of moving traffic. That my own keen reflexes saved him from serious injury and that the car following had similar excellent reflexes and was able to avoid rear-ending me. The witness would confirm that the lights were on green and that our speed was modest. In effect, that the boy's injury was entirely his own fault by stepping out without looking.

I carried that emergency 'reminder' kit around for some years but haven't had one for a while now. I must make up another. With a list of 'things to do' and a pencil and paper. A mobile will be useful these days of course to video the scene and audio log witness details and any admissions of guilt that people tend to utter and then later claim they never said. From my limited experience of such matters, I think that the more contemporaneous evidence obtained the better.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
It is all very confusing.
A dash cam is always good.
If someone steps out into the road without looking, it is their fault - always,
unless you are speeding, or drunk.
How can it be the driver's fault?
I assume he came between parked cars, as the driver was only doing 20 mph?
No, there wasn't any parked cars. He was stood stationary at the side of the road, he stepped out right before I was passing. In urban areas, it's common to see people stood by the side of the road, very rarely will they step out into the road without looking.

Generally it's the pedestrians fault. If it's at a crossing where the light is red or at a zebra crossing then it would usually be the drivers fault. If a driver is speeding, then I think that bought the pedestrian and driver are at fault.
 
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