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So if I'm reading that right it's a tapered shim ? That makes sense - but quite expensive to make and should really be made individually to suit each car with the problem. Although if they've got enough data and the errors are consistent they might get away with one size sorts all. Confirms my suspicion that the axle manufacturing jig (and/or the inspection process) was at fault.
Thanks for the update.
 

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So if I'm reading that right it's a tapered shim ? That makes sense - but quite expensive to make and should really be made individually to suit each car with the problem. Although if they've got enough data and the errors are consistent they might get away with one size sorts all. Confirms my suspicion that the axle manufacturing jig (and/or the inspection process) was at fault.
Thanks for the update.
No you have it all wrong my friend, the part number 43081A is the four bolts that hold the hub to the axle a shim washer will be fitted inbetween hub and axle on individual bolts to bring the alignment to within the stated tolerence, its a bodge job if you ask me but if they get it wrong it will show up.
 

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No you have it all wrong my friend, the part number 43081A is the four bolts that hold the hub to the axle a shim washer will be fitted inbetween hub and axle on individual bolts to bring the alignment to within the stated tolerence, its a bodge job if you ask me but if they get it wrong it will show up.
For instance if we have a toe in problem then you would fit 2 extremely thin shims maybe 1mm thick to the front top and bottom bolts thus reducing the toe in.
Basically you are making the hub not fit properly onto the axle, I dont know if this is classed as a modification for insurance purposes.
 

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Pretty sure if it's done by the manufacturer according to a manufacturer procedure it will count as an adjustment not a modification for insurance purposes.
 

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For instance if we have a toe in problem then you would fit 2 extremely thin shims maybe 1mm thick to the front top and bottom bolts thus reducing the toe in.
Basically you are making the hub not fit properly onto the axle, I dont know if this is classed as a modification for insurance purposes.
Sorry - didn't read your earlier post closely enough. Now I understand - but I'm less impressed. Sounds a bit of a bodge - as you say the hub will not be properly located and a large mating surface will reduced down to - sort of - 4 points. Presumably the shims will only be fractions of a mil thick but still - not great.
 

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Forgive my intervention Chaps, but I am a recent purchaser of a Tekna registered in October 2014. Is this a universal problem with Leafs of a particular age, or are only sporadic cars affected? Should I assume that my car has this misalignment, or should I simply monitor tyre wear? Thanks in anticipation.
 

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I noticed mine at the first service and then noticed my second leaf had exactly the same wear on the same wheel at its service. So you should be able to spot it with about 18K miles wear.
 

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Update on my ongoing alignment issue.
Nissan Tech have maintained that in order to get an accurate alignment reading
1. new tyres should be fitted to the front
2. Alignment test carried out
3. Results sent to Nissan Tech.
4. Second appointment to have the shims fitted.

Simple Right !!

No the Nissan Dealer had the car all day didnt fit new tyres did alignment test and sent data to Nissan Tech, all pointless, in all my days I have never come across such a bunch of xxxxwits.

I explained to them in the morning what needed to be done did they do it No.

Grrr
 

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2 Leaves, thanks. I have a car with an odd make of tyre, different from the remainder, on the O/S rear. Bodes ill methinks!

Layzee, I commend to to heed the Law below:-

Motco's Law of Universal Incompetence:

"Always assume that the professional person, service operative, tradesperson, artisan, or other individual with whom you are dealing is incompetent unless, and until, they demonstrate to the contrary"
?
Follow this rule and you will rarely be disappointed. It applies to all walks of life from brain surgeons to garbage sorters, and lawyers to checkout operators. Members of this forum excepted, obviously.
It has served me well! :rolleyes:
 

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Fro my 2013 Sunderland built Leaf, I found that my NSR wore down to (below) the legal limit in just under 20,000 miles. After a fruitless discussion with Nissan I decided that over the probable 100,000 miles that I will keep my Leaf, the extra cost of replacing rear tyres early is less than the cost of getting Nissan to replace the rear beam (with no assurance that replacing the rear beam will cure the problem).
 

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The axle is a stub axle bolted to the rear suspension. Absolutely no problem in shimming this if it is done by a competent mechanic.

The key is to start with a 4 wheel alignment (Hunter preferably) done at correct ride height to measure rear thrust angle and rear toe.
 

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Before I pay for a Hunter check, I'll run mine over my Trakrite. It may not be the correct tool but it's in the garage and costs nothing to try.

 

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Trakrite will do no harm but the key this is to measure the rear axle OVERALL in relationship to centre (zero thrust line of the car). For this I'm not sure that the Trakrite will provide any useful data.

In answer to some of the posts, the shims will not need to be tapered. Some simple shim stock will do the job.

Will the shims affect the overall axle width or affect the position of the wheel with respect to the body. NO. see example below:-

Say the tracking of one rear wheel is out by 3mm at the periphery of an 18" wheel (9" radius), and the stub axle bolting distance front to rear is 4.5", then by similar angles the distance out at the front (or rear depending on excessive toe-out or toe-in) is 18/4.5 x 3mm or 0.75mm. This is how much shimming will be required. NOTE to mathematicians, yes I'm aware this is an approximation but remember tan (very small angle) is approximately the same as sin (very small angle). By the same simple math, toe out by 2mm at the rim would require 0.5mm shim at the bolts.

Obviously this is an over simplification and the real numbers need to be added in.

Regards
 

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Here's a link to a video for Fiat500 rear suspension toe-in shimming. It outlines the basic principle but uses a proprietary shim (No need for this if one knows what to do)
 

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freddym, I don't expect to gain much at all from the Trakrite test, especially as a truly level billiard-table smooth surface is hard to find anywhere - less so in this area. However I doubt that a slight incline/decline will make a lot of difference and it is asymmetry of result I shall expect to see in a case where one tyre on an axle is worn in preference to the other. It pays to give thought to how Trakrite works. If one wheel is able to run on a grippy surface and the other on a very slippery surface, then that second wheel's direction will be dominated by the other side. This will cause a sideways movement of the Trakrite platen away from the direction of error of the wheel alignment. How this can be interpreted and then translated into angles is anyone's guess though! We'll see...
 

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Well I have tried and failed to glean any useful information from Trakrite. My driveway is large enough to do it, but it's coarse tarmac and on a slope. No matter how hard I brush it with a yard broom it still has grit on it and because of the slope I cannot allow the car to trundle over it 'on idle' as it were and it either coasting over or 'driving' over causes anomalies. So I have logged three measurements across each tyre and kept a record c/w mileage so I can monitor any abnormalities over time. As the car was bought to gently re-introduce my Good Lady to driving after a long period of abstinence, it isn't getting a huge amount of use currently. Watch this space!
 

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This is how the Caterham boys shim their rear axles for toe-in (and/or castor)

 

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Arrgh! Cateringvans! This is my track day machine! There's a friendly rivalry between Caterhams and Westfields as you may be aware.

Thanks for the link though, the source may have a laser cutting service to drawings. I need to know the thickness first of course.

 

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Above link is from Note Owners forum and apparently Notes suffer from the same shoddy quality control as the Leaf.

The good news is that the Renault Motorsport guys in the link will work off the Hunter Alignment figures and calculate what correction you need. It would be good to summarise the Leaf model year specific rear alignment specifications (camber and toe) and post on this forum.

Personally I find the vehicles manufacturers are a dead waste of time on these kind of issues and best just to get on with it and fix the problem.
 
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