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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have recently had a Wallbox Quasar V2G charger installed (I am part of the Electric Nation trial). The Quasar can be set to charge at any rate from 6A to 32A. My old Polar 16A EVSE is disconnected (but still installed) as part of the trial conditions. When the trial is over I will have both available.
My question is does anyone know if there is any difference to battery life/degredation between charging methods? I know DC fast charging too often is not good for battery life but is there any difference between charging at 16A AC and 16A DC and would charging at 16A AC be kinder than 32A DC?
 

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I have recently had a Wallbox Quasar V2G charger installed (I am part of the Electric Nation trial). The Quasar can be set to charge at any rate from 6A to 32A. My old Polar 16A EVSE is disconnected (but still installed) as part of the trial conditions. When the trial is over I will have both available.
My question is does anyone know if there is any difference to battery life/degredation between charging methods? I know DC fast charging too often is not good for battery life but is there any difference between charging at 16A AC and 16A DC and would charging at 16A AC be kinder than 32A DC?
No
 

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Despite the flippant nature of @freddym s response, the point he makes re all charging being DC is correct. (Converting the incoming AC to DC for charging is what the onboard charger in your car is doing).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes, I knew that probably should have have thought about it a bit more before asking the question. But the suggestion is that charging at 16A is kinder than at 32A, Agree?
 

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Despite the flippant nature of @freddym s response, the point he makes re all charging being DC is correct. (Converting the incoming AC to DC for charging is what the onboard charger in your car is doing).
As we all know, this is a social forum of sorts not for review of scientific papers. The OP request for enlightenment will sadly be disappointed: opinions may be expressed, argued over, anecdotes offered. General Arrhenius principles might be invoked. In the absence of anything definitive, consider reading the manual. Lastly consider convenience,
 

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My Fluence seems to pack more in at 8 amps than 16 amps. The GOM does not start reducing for about 5 miles when charged at 8A. At 16A, it's down by 10 miles by that stage.
 

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My understanding is 7KW (32a) is about the best rate for battery life... 16a will be perfectly fine. More - such as 11kw or 22kw will also probably not hurt too much.

My understanding is, that as you move up to 30, 40, 50 + KW rates is the damage to the batteries (in the current 400v cars) is increasingly severe - until when you get to 150KWh you really are putting in a ton of power very quickly.....

I cannot imagine 16a is any better for the battery than 32a - indeed my handbook suggests the 7kw charger (rather than 2.3kw granny charger) is the preferred option.
 

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Leaf 30kWh, HS PHEV
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The 6A to 32A is with regards to 250VAC.

When you charge using AC connector, onboard connector converts from AC to DC.

As mentioned all charging is done using DC.

One difference in this instance is that V2G unit rather than onboard converter is converting from AC to DC and the other way around.

If you have special tariff / low rate window choose the amperage that allows you to charge the car as needed.

If your previous 16A charger took x hours, the new charge at 32A will take half as much
If you go 8A it will take 2x - you get the idea


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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So these new 800V cars, if they will take the same current (and 50kw isn't THAT fast now) they could be 140KW easily.... hence how they can get up to 375W charge now.
 

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So these new 800V cars, if they will take the same current (and 50kw isn't THAT fast now) they could be 140KW easily.... hence how they can get up to 375W charge now.
Which EV can charge at 375 kW (I assume that's what you mean, not Watts) now?
 

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E-Niro 4
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So these new 800V cars, if they will take the same current (and 50kw isn't THAT fast now) they could be 140KW easily.... hence how they can get up to 375W charge now.
The answer is none. The fastest any can charge currently is around 270kw for the Taycan.
 

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Ioniq 38kwh 2020
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It depends too on the size of the battery you are charging. 7kW on a 10kWh battery (like a phev) would be like a 70kW on a 70kWh battery.
Charging a 50Kwh battery at 50Kw would be 1C charge rate, which isn't thought to be damaging to the battery (indeed under acceleration all batteries generally exceed around 2.5C discharge rate, albeit fairly briefly, but that is equally as damaging)

A slower rate of charge can actually be more efficient though as some cars like the Ioniq 38 activate the battery heater below about 20°above 3.7kW, so that energy is completely wasted unless you are going to drive immediately after charging.
 
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