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Hi everyone!
I'm writing an article for people thinking about switching to an EV, addressing some of their most frequently asked questions. One of the most common topics is around range - whether it's overcoming range anxiety or learning about new ways to increase your EV's range. I'd love to include some quotes from current EV drivers about what they wish they knew about range before buying an EV. Please let me know if you have a tip you'd be willing to share and wouldn't mind me including your name in the article! Thanks!
 

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Range anxiety is when you are getting low on your energy resource, a Petrol or Diesel car with the gauge approaching zero will have the same effect. Common sense says when it gets to 1/4 full ie about 60 miles left, fill up just the same as I did with my diesel.
 

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Range anxiety is when you are getting low on your energy resource, a Petrol or Diesel car with the gauge approaching zero will have the same effect. Common sense says when it gets to 1/4 full ie about 60 miles left, fill up just the same as I did with my diesel.
I think the main difference is on an ICE car you can almost ignore the gauge until it lights up - if you have 40-50 miles left after that you can just go ‘oh I suppose I’ll pull into the next petrol station I see, or wait until I’m closer to home’ - knowing pretty securely you’ll just stumble upon one without any effort. (except perhaps the M25..)

On an EV if you wait for ‘low range’ or whatever alerts they give, and you have 20 miles left, you are also (probably) pretty close to a charger, but you’re way less likely to just drive past it naturally so you’ll have to seek it out - and it might be easy to find, or tucked away at the back of a garden center or hotel somewhere.


Some cars have more overall range but not all - my wife’s old clio was only used for around town and got probably less than 250 miles per tank so actual range was less than many EVs - but when you’re tripping over petrol stations that doesn’t matter.
 

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Except there are more public chargers than petrol stations.
Nearly every house is a potential charging point.
AA and RAC vans are being equipped with emergency charging.

Range anxiety is something perceived by potential EV owners that does not exist.

In my opinion the thing that is missing is the reliability of chargers and education.
 

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2018 Nissan Leaf 40kWh Tekna - love it
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Oh, it does exist. Quite a few people, including me, have stated here that when planning a long journey, they take the diesel (or at least weigh up the pros and cons) rather than the EV.
This EV database will give a good idea of the currently available EV's range.
 

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Hi everyone!
I'm writing an article for people thinking about switching to an EV, addressing some of their most frequently asked questions. One of the most common topics is around range - whether it's overcoming range anxiety or learning about new ways to increase your EV's range. I'd love to include some quotes from current EV drivers about what they wish they knew about range before buying an EV. Please let me know if you have a tip you'd be willing to share and wouldn't mind me including your name in the article! Thanks!
I think you are in the wrong forum. Is the article aimed at Americans?
Americans living in California or Americans living in Wyoming. Best to ask the people who live in the same area that you will be targeting your article at.
BTW, I live in Scotland and have zero range anxiety but is your article aimed at Scottish readers?
 

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Except there are more public chargers than petrol stations.
Nearly every house is a potential charging point.
AA and RAC vans are being equipped with emergency charging.

Range anxiety is something perceived by potential EV owners that does not exist.

In my opinion the thing that is missing is the reliability of chargers and education.
Problem with that statement is - you can't just rock up and charge at someone's house whenever you feel like it, you only want to call the AA/RAC in times of desperate need, not for a quick top up, and that point about reliability of chargers adds massively to perceived range anxiety! If all chargers worked reliably and were simple to access without having to have half a dozen apps and subscriptions lined up - like filling an ICE car at a petrol station by tapping your bank card on the machine, things would be far better! It's not exactly hard to achieve either!
 

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It doesn't take long before range anxiety is replaced with my chosen charger be working anxiety. In both of the EV's I've owned the range prediction has been very accurate and I have no doubt that I will be able to get to my chosen destination with a suitable amount of range left. The anxiety comes from not knowing if the charger will be working or already occupied. Here in the UK (this is predominately a UK forum), there are now enough rapid chargers that eking out range to reach a charger has become a thing of the past for most of us, you might have to stop a little earlier than you would have liked, but there are not many places where it's touch and go to get to the next charger.
 

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Things are a bit weird in most countries right now as very few people are driving as normal because of the pandemic so is any survey now going to be representative? People are thinking very differently about things at the moment.

If you are able to charge your car at home, and rarely drive more than 300km to 350km in a day, then it is hard to see how range anxiety can be a real thing with many EVs being well able to drive 300km to 350km miles between charges. I used to drive between 20,000 and 30,000 miles a year for work with a lot of that over the last year in a company EV (in the USA). The big problems were not being able to trust the daft range display in the car (an absolutely hopeless thing) and the availability of chargers on the rare times I drove further than the range of the car (parts of the USA are worse than here for chargers). I can count on less than the number of fingers on one hand the number of times I needed to use a roadside charger in 6 or 7 months of high mileage EV driving as there was almost always enough range to go where I needed to go and get back to base and charge overnight.

I am lucky if I drive more than 100km a week at the moment whereas this time last year I was driving 800km a week. Here the average distance cars drive each year is roughly 16,000km and if 90% of that is people driving to and from work for roughly 230 days a year, then that breaks down to roughly 63km per day during the week and 12km per day at weekends. There are not many EVs around that have a range anywhere near that low so it is hard to understand why range anxiety should be a thing for most daily driving.

In the probably vain hope that the powers that be eventually decide we are allowed off the leash we have been planning a driving holiday, as we will probably not be allowed out of the country. Chargers here are thin on the ground but frankly that is not really a problem at all. The solid 300km to 350km range that I am sure I can rely on is as far as we want to drive in a day. Even using the slow charger that comes with the car I am sure that we will be just fine even if that only adds roughly 10km of range an hour. Getting somewhere by 6pm and charging the car till after breakfast the next day would add about 150km that would be more than enough for driving out to places to visit and back and the car would end up being fully charged for the drive home by the end of a week away I am sure.
 

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There are a few things I've learned.

1) ABC - Always be charged. I like to know I can hop in the car and go where I want. So I keep the car topped up to over 80% +.

80% gives me about 180m range. I cannot think of a trip I'd need to make with no notice over 180m where I couldn't do a rapid charge. However I CAN think of journeys of 50m or so I might need to make with no notice, so I'd never keep my car under 30% charged (in reality not less than 50% which gives me about 120m in current climate). If you suddenly need to do a trip it might be REALLY sudden, and then even 3/4 of an hour on a rapid charger to get you there is too long.

2) Pre-condition - I have found I can massively increase my range by pre-conditioning the car to a temp well above (in winter) or well below (in summer) what I want whilst plugged in, and then do without the climate controls on the car for a fair while. So in winter, setting the heater to 25 or 26 degrees, and having that on for half an hour means all the plastics and materials in the car are very warm. These then give off heat as I am driving and so keep the cabin warm, the battery is also warm. Then as soon as I feel cool, I turn the climate control on, and set to Auto and a temp I am happy with. I have found by doing this, in moderate weather I can do a large distance without the heater on - 46 miles yesterday as the sun was out, and so the car just stayed really nice temperature - but if I hadn't done it, it wouldn't have been.

3) One pedal / max regen. - I rarely if ever press the brake pedal now. Literally hundreds of miles can be covered without pressing the brake using good anticipation of the road ahead and max regen. If you are pressing the brake you are turning kinetic energy into heat in the brakes, whereas on regen it's being turned back into electrical energy in the battery. Also, use max regen earlier in the slowing down process, then ease off the regen (easy on mine as it's paddle controlled) and roll up to the lights or whatever. Quite often by doing this, the lights turn whilst the car is still doing 20-30mph rather than max regen to a halt, and then have to pull away again. I do wonder if some people following me wonder what I'm doing - but it's also saving them fuel in their ICE cars as they aren't having to pull away from 0mph.

Do those three and you'll see some decent figures like this:-

142504


This was on a mid speed A road constantly changing from 30 / 40 / 50 and 60 mph limits, up and over the top of the Mendips - Taken yesterday.
 

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Range anxiety soon turns into range awareness when you own an EV. Once you get to grips with your EV’s range and your normal journey routine it becomes second nature. I can almost judge a distance and energy consumption and plan around that, the ABC (always be charging) routine works for me.

Having no home charger I mostly destination charge, I’ve done this now for 4 years in my Leaf 30 and have never run out of energy. Came close once when a charger was out of action, but I try to charge once my battery is at 20 to 30% so had that buffer available.
 
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