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Hi,

I'm a complete novice when it comes to EV so am looking for general advice and guidance please.

I'm due to change later in the year and I am giving serious consideration to a PHEV as me next car. As I say I've never had experience of such so have one or two questions.

Firstly, and for example, if I went for a BMW 330e could you charge off your home circuit overnight (13amp) and expect a full battery.

The electric range typically appears to realise between say 30 - 40 miles on a full charge. The journey to work involves mostly dual carriageway and the M5. Realistically what could you expect out of the electric motor in such circumstances with a distance to work at 22 miles both ways.

Finally although the mainstream manufacturers appear to allege MPG at circa 100 - 130 what could you expect. I'm trying to allow for fuel saving to determine if it's worth the cost of the PHEV.

Many thanks.
 

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2016 Nissan LEAF SL
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With a PHEV You could definitely get a full battery overnight on a 13 Amp charger due to the small battery. This would be easy. Make sure your wiring is up to scratch, and in the long term it's still worth considering getting a proper home charger installed.

Looking at the real world range that Pod Point have listed for the 330e it looks like 19 miles is what you can expect from a full charge in electric mode.

Is there a reason why you are thinking of a PHEV over an EV? A 22 Mile commute would be easy enough for any new EV today and would come with more benefits than a hybrid, as well as typically better reliability.

Regarding fuel efficiency, it really depends how often you plug in and how far you drive afterwards. Drive 20 miles (19 electric, 1 petrol) and it will tell you you're in the hundreds of MPG. Take it for a long motorway run purely on petrol and it will probably give you a slightly worse figure than the basic petrol model since you're carrying the extra weight of the battery pack.

How you use it makes a huge difference. But from what I have read so far, going full electric may be the better option. Have you looked into a company called Onto? They offer 1 month rolling subscriptions to electric cars so it would be a good option for trying one out before you commit to see if buying a full EV would suit your needs.
 

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Kona PremSe64k 2020+bluelink +ohme
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I'd vote for opening your mind to a full EV. If you fit a charger at home then you can kiss goodbye to fossil fuels. The starting point, imo, is to look at your driving needs. I for example drive 100 miles each way once a week which can be in a single day, so no time to charge. Thus I needed a car with at least 200 mile range. Actually I wanted some headroom because winter mileages are less than summer and in the end went for Hyundai Kona with over 250 miles, and some people getting over 300. Never looked back. The joy of going to the front of your car and plugging it in to the charger takes about 30 seconds. Then finding the car fully charged every morning is an absolute delight.

Yes EVs generally cost more than ICE cars, sometimes much more. If you can afford an EV to suit your , as with most people here you'll never look back.
 

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Something also worth remembering is that lithium ion battery packs loose capacity over time (degredation) depending on how many charging cycles they've gone through, this is dependent on chemistry (main factor) but also includes how they're charged, how the pack is cooled, if it is left empty or full for long periods (both bad, empty worst).

Typical losses are in the range of 10-20% over 1000-2000 cycles so if you think about a phev that has an EV only range of 20 miles you can see that degredation could start to be a problem from anything from 20,000 to 40,000 pure EV miles and by 100,000 I'd expect the pack to need replacing.
 

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Someone around the corner from me has a 330e, when it was new, they plugged it in every night. They've still got it but now I never see it being plugged in. I suspect they can't be bothered for the meagre savings of a couple of litres of petrol.

It's worth doing some sums, to see just how many miles you have to drive in electric mode to pay for the hybrid premium, assuming you do 20 miles a day in electric mode 5 days a week, that's 100 miles per week or roughly 5000 miles a year, assuming you would normally expect 40 mpg, that's 125 gallons or 568 litres per year. At £1.15 per litre the saving is £654 per year. If your PHEV costs an extra £5K that's 7.5 years to pay for the PHEV, I'm assuming a 7 year old PHEV isn't worth any more than a non PHEV model. I've ignored the cost of the electricity as it's quite small.
 

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Kona PremSe64k 2020+bluelink +ohme
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Talking of degradation, or not. How about a kona with 60k miles on the clock. Zero degradation. Driven on motorway daily, fast charged to 80% all the time. That's a quality battery system imo.
 

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I think the priority is not EV or PHEV, but BMW3.

My genuine opinion is that it is overpriced and the PHEV from BMW are even more overpriced.

I find a dichotomy between saving on fuel and getting a BMW. If priority is driving a BMW, then let that one be the leading argument in the decision making.

If priority is to save money (fuel, maintenance), there are cheaper and solid, time-tested EVs that people here can recommend, in all categories: Zoe/Leaf, Ioniq, Kona electric etc.
 

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I think that a key question is whether this is a company car, which I assume it is?

If so, then full EVs will give you massive BIK savings. The 330e attracts BIK rates of 10%, 11% and 12% through 2020-2022, while an EV will attract 0%, 1% and 2% BIK rates. You're looking at £60-£100 per month extra out of your own pocket to have a 330e over a full EV, even before you get to fuel costs.

A Tesla model 3 is the most direct full-EV competitor to a 330e (in terms of performance, saloon body style, size, price, etc) and well worth a look.

Generally PHEVs perform very poorly in fuel economy terms if not charged. The old NEDC and even the newer WLTP tests are VERY favourable to PHEVs, but you won't get remotely close to 100mpg. For example, autocar's long term test of the Prius Prime (Toyota Prius Plug-in long-term review | Autocar) returned 96 mpg, despite absolutely religious use of plugging it in - and the Prius drivetrain is set up for levels of efficiency from petrol that the 330e will not get anywhere near (eg atkinson cycle engine, the way the HSD system works, aerodynamics, etc). I think that if you plug it in as much as you possibly can you might reasonably expect to get about 60-70mpg overall from the 330e. If your usage of the car is enough shorter journeys that you can complete on electricity to push the mpg number up, then you'd do perfectly well with an EV as ANY EV currently on sale has far better electric range than a 330e, and will use less electricity (more miles per kWh - PHEVs aren't good on this).
 

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Poor @Conks01 appears to have been character assassinated before he can even reply. A Rep only interested in a BMW because its a compay car. 🤦‍♂️

He hasn't actually mentioned doing any business mileage so on that basis I'm going to assume he wants a nice commuter car and the BMW seemed to fit the bill based on a healthy dose of BMW lies about EV range and an inbuilt fear of range anxiety (less of a thing that charger anxiety which the OP will learn themselves).

In the absence of sufficient data I'd say go try some EVs you can afford in your budget range. So that might include Tesla Model 3, Hyundai Kona/Kia e-Niro, Maybe the Kia Soul or the Ioniq. Or if you want something a cheaper, say if you were going to switch to owned rather than PCP perhaps check out the Zoe (not really a motorway cruiser but more than capable in your case and you'll only be charging once a week with your commute) or if you want to go to cheapest motorway happy car consider trying the MG ZS EV, its a nice car on motorways but doesn't have the range of the Zoe or the Korean cars. It does however go a heap further than the 19mile BMW Phev. (y)
 

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2020 i3
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Hi,

I'm a complete novice when it comes to EV so am looking for general advice and guidance please.

I'm due to change later in the year and I am giving serious consideration to a PHEV as me next car. As I say I've never had experience of such so have one or two questions.

Firstly, and for example, if I went for a BMW 330e could you charge off your home circuit overnight (13amp) and expect a full battery.

The electric range typically appears to realise between say 30 - 40 miles on a full charge. The journey to work involves mostly dual carriageway and the M5. Realistically what could you expect out of the electric motor in such circumstances with a distance to work at 22 miles both ways.

Finally although the mainstream manufacturers appear to allege MPG at circa 100 - 130 what could you expect. I'm trying to allow for fuel saving to determine if it's worth the cost of the PHEV.

Many thanks.
To answer your questions:

Yes - the latest 330e has a 12 kwh battery so will easily charge overnight. As someone else said just check your wiring/extension cable are up to it and dont melt, you can reduce the charge rate via the iDrive if necessary.

At motorway speeds expect to only get 25 miles of electric range.

On petrol only when the battery is exhausted expect 40 mpg.

It will depend on how often you charge and fully deplete the battery and also road speed and conditions as to what you actually get. I had a 2018 225 with a smaller battery (it was cheap) and averaged c65mpg over 18 mths. It wasn't a great car but I do believe the 330e with larger battery is a much better car and has more practical electric range. One thing that particularly annoyed me was that if you left the car in hybrid mode were it should manage the fuel use it would mainly run on petrol and you would arrive at your destination with the battery nearly full. So a bit of button pushing was required to make most use of the battery.

I have since moved to an i3 (it was also cheap), it is tons better than the 225 and overall very impressed but the PHEV concept still has some validity for me. Our second car may well be a PHEV if any of the manufacturers can make a decent one that meets our criteria, Mk 8 Golf GTE maybe.
 

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In reply to the OPs original question, yes you’ll get full charge within 3 hours using the 3 pin plug, like I do.

I run the original F30 330e (a 67 plate) with the smaller battery pack and regularly see 18-20 miles usage which really helps on the commute. I haven’t yet noticed any battery degradation. I’d say if you’re looking at the G20 with a slightly larger pack then 25 or more should easily be possible.

Regarding the mpg quotes, it all depends on your daily commute or regular journey. If it’s mainly motorways you won’t see a lot of benefit, if there a mix of A roads, city traffic etc then you definitely will. My average is usually 130mpg each way when I can charge at work, otherwise it drops to 70mpg on the return journey.

Enjoy, it’s a lovely car if it’s what you’re looking at (and it’ll give you 330d/330i performance with torque close to the 340i... if you’re interested in BMWs)
 

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As another PHEV owner (not BMW), I would agree with most of what has been said above.Ultimately it depends on what type of driving you do. I am retired and most of my driving is very local, so all done on battery, thus the MPG is irrelevant. When I do make a longer journey, I don't have the range apprehension of pure EV drivers, nor do I, as some people on here have said that they do, drive an alternative ICE car for longer journeys. My next car will probably be full EV, but the charging situation has improved over the last few years whilst I've owned the PHEV. Don't panic too much about battery degradation. My car has just under 60,000 miles and the battery still has 84% state of health. That has only dropped the battery range by about 2 miles.
 
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