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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, am wondering if anyone has any experience or advice on installing chargers behind their house in a parking space? Crest Nicholson are our freeholder (we own the house, garden and parking spaces) so they own the path. Their solicitor has refused us permission to install a charger in our parking space. They won't let us put it in our garden and get a gulley for the cable either. Has anyone had success challenging this kind of thing?

Picture below, we are plot 9. The yellow pavement belongs to Crest,

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If you need to cross someone else’s land, and you can’t make a casual arrangement, which is what I’ve done with my neighbour, then it’s a case of way leave. I don’t know how that works officially. There’s presumably some easement in place, you’d need to speak to a solicitor who can advise.

I suppose an important question is why have they refused?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks :). We actually haven't completed yet, so will see what my solicitor says. I'm not confident they will know how to deal with it though! Crest are saying we can't install one because its a health and safety risk, but if we go under the pavement I am not sure I agree that it is.
 

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There are a few safe ways to get a cable across a pavement, the best is probably just to install a slot across it, perhaps something like a linear drain, through which a cable can be run, ideally inside a duct laid in the drain: CD A10-H10G-02 Linear Drainage Channel | Clark-Drain These drains are approved for use on footpaths and pavements, so present no safety risk, and if you offered to bear the cost of installing it then perhaps they might have a re-think.

Hard to see how they could object to a linear drain across the path, and doing this would also allow a hose to be fed across safely, when washing the car. Perhaps worth mentioning this to them as well, and suggest that without something like this it's quite likely that you and the owner of plot 10 are going to end up running hoses over the path from time to time any way, and they could be as significant a trip hazard as a cable, unless tucked down into a channel with a cover on top.
 

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Perhaps they have misunderstood, and think that you intend to trail a cable over the path - creating a trip hazard and becoming a H&S issue. Or perhaps are wary at a post being near to their walkway. There are many solutions that can install the unit into a box that can be sunk in the ground leaving no visual clue that it's even there. Some roadside installations use those methods in places where visual impact of more street furniture is undesirable. Something expensive like this. And probably way beyond the budget.


Alternatively, I have seen someone who simply laid a mains power supply to a box in the ground and used the granny charger from there to plug the car in. That would just need permission to mole under the path to the box level with your parking place surface.

 

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Might also be worth pointing out that Hampshire Council (and possibly others) have a policy of allowing car charging cables to be run across pavements, provided they are protected by a suitable cable protector, that has high contrast markings. The standard sort of site cable protectors that are used around road and building works are generally accepted as being safe. These are very commonly used on film and TV location sets, often miles of the things snaking around areas where there may well be hundreds of people wandering around. I think it would be very hard to argue that such a thing was unsafe, given their widespread use. These are the sort of things I'm talking about: Cable Covers, Cable Protectors & Ramps - The Ramp People

 

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you need to understand what they've based their decision on. Unfortunately the chances are they have a crap policy of saying no to everything so they don't have to think about it or realistically consider it. A lot of property companies work that way it seems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Perhaps they have misunderstood, and think that you intend to trail a cable over the path - creating a trip hazard and becoming a H&S issue. Or perhaps are wary at a post being near to their walkway. There are many solutions that can install the unit into a box that can be sunk in the ground leaving no visual clue that it's even there. Some roadside installations use those methods in places where visual impact of more street furniture is undesirable. Something expensive like this. And probably way beyond the budget.


Alternatively, I have seen someone who simply laid a mains power supply to a box in the ground and used the granny charger from there to plug the car in. That would just need permission to mole under the path to the box level with your parking place surface.

Thanks - no I made it clear I could do either option - either a post in my space with a cable under the path, or a charger in my garden with a cable and gulley. I am going to challenge them though but wanted to be prepared with how I argue it! I don't mind investing in an installation, so cost doesn't bother me. Useful info above on a box in the ground, so thank you :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Might also be worth pointing out that Hampshire Council (and possibly others) have a policy of allowing car charging cables to be run across pavements, provided they are protected by a suitable cable protector, that has high contrast markings. The standard sort of site cable protectors that are used around road and building works are generally accepted as being safe. These are very commonly used on film and TV location sets, often miles of the things snaking around areas where there may well be hundreds of people wandering around. I think it would be very hard to argue that such a thing was unsafe, given their widespread use. These are the sort of things I'm talking about: Cable Covers, Cable Protectors & Ramps - The Ramp People

Thanks! I may look at what Surrey CC have :)
 

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Hi, am wondering if anyone has any experience or advice on installing chargers behind their house in a parking space? Crest Nicholson are our freeholder (we own the house, garden and parking spaces) so they own the path. Their solicitor has refused us permission to install a charger in our parking space. They won't let us put it in our garden and get a gulley for the cable either. Has anyone had success challenging this kind of thing?

Picture below, we are plot 9. The yellow pavement belongs to Crest,

View attachment 145151
OK, lets say you installed a charger in the bottom of your garden (plot 9). You could access it from the outside via a small (lockable) door in the fence. What would stop you charging your car by plugging a cable between the car in YOUR car parking space and YOUR garden. Nothing! To deter lawsuits and prevent a nuisance, invest in some heavy duty cable ramps. Probably worth trying first with a granny cable!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
you need to understand what they've based their decision on. Unfortunately the chances are they have a crap policy of saying no to everything so they don't have to think about it or realistically consider it. A lot of property companies work that way it seems.
Thanks, I think you might be right and this is the case. It has taken me a month to get any kind of response from them on this! I am going to keep pushing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
OK, lets say you installed a charger in the bottom of your garden (plot 9). You could access it from the outside via a small (lockable) door in the fence. What would stop you charging your car by plugging a cable between the car in YOUR car parking space and YOUR garden. Nothing! To deter lawsuits and prevent a nuisance, invest in some heavy duty cable ramps. Probably worth trying first with a granny cable!
OK, lets say you installed a charger in the bottom of your garden (plot 9). You could access it from the outside via a small (lockable) door in the fence. What would stop you charging your car by plugging a cable between the car in YOUR car parking space and YOUR garden. Nothing! To deter lawsuits and prevent a nuisance, invest in some heavy duty cable ramps. Probably worth trying first with a granny cable!
I think its because they own the path between my parking space and the garden gate - and didn't want to get into trouble once I spent all the money on installation!
 

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Another key point is that, if you were able to get consent for the cable, then as you own the parking space I think you would be eligible for the grant. However, you could probably only get the grant if you had consent to run a cable over the path.

If you can't get this consent, then I suspect you may not be able to get the grant, in which case just fitting a charge point at the end of your garden and running the cable (suitably protected) across the path seems like a reasonable option. I doubt that the freeholder would be the slightest bit bothered by such temporary use, if they found out about it after the event. As long as no one complains about it then they probably wouldn't ever find out.

I'm pretty sure that there is a fair bit of stuff like this that goes on with no form of consent, anyway. Many years ago we had a neighbour (in a terraced house, with no off-road parking) who had a Heath Robinson arrangement to sling a cable over the pavement, on a sort of home made gantry set up in his front garden, so that he could warm his car up in winter. He had a fan heater set up inside the car, with a lead running to the boot, and would use this to make sure his car was nice and toasty inside before he set of for work. Everyone nearby joked about it, but he never got into any trouble with the council about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Another key point is that, if you were able to get consent for the cable, then as you own the parking space I think you would be eligible for the grant. However, you could probably only get the grant if you had consent to run a cable over the path.

If you can't get this consent, then I suspect you may not be able to get the grant, in which case just fitting a charge point at the end of your garden and running the cable (suitably protected) across the path seems like a reasonable option. I doubt that the freeholder would be the slightest bit bothered by such temporary use, if they found out about it after the event. As long as no one complains about it then they probably wouldn't ever find out.

I'm pretty sure that there is a fair bit of stuff like this that goes on with no form of consent, anyway. Many years ago we had a neighbour (in a terraced house, with no off-road parking) who had a Heath Robinson arrangement to sling a cable over the pavement, on a sort of home made gantry set up in his front garden, so that he could warm his car up in winter. He had a fan heater set up inside the car, with a lead running to the boot, and would use this to make sure his car was nice and toasty inside before he set of for work. Everyone nearby joked about it, but he never got into any trouble with the council about it.
Don't spend any money, just charge initially with a granny (in a box), cable over the fence, under a proper cable ramp, etc.
Another key point is that, if you were able to get consent for the cable, then as you own the parking space I think you would be eligible for the grant. However, you could probably only get the grant if you had consent to run a cable over the path.

If you can't get this consent, then I suspect you may not be able to get the grant, in which case just fitting a charge point at the end of your garden and running the cable (suitably protected) across the path seems like a reasonable option. I doubt that the freeholder would be the slightest bit bothered by such temporary use, if they found out about it after the event. As long as no one complains about it then they probably wouldn't ever find out.

I'm pretty sure that there is a fair bit of stuff like this that goes on with no form of consent, anyway. Many years ago we had a neighbour (in a terraced house, with no off-road parking) who had a Heath Robinson arrangement to sling a cable over the pavement, on a sort of home made gantry set up in his front garden, so that he could warm his car up in winter. He had a fan heater set up inside the car, with a lead running to the boot, and would use this to make sure his car was nice and toasty inside before he set of for work. Everyone nearby joked about it, but he never got into any trouble with the council about it.
We could, but long term I was hoping to have something easy in place so we didn't have to faff about running cables. Its also the principle of the thing - its a new build house and Crest Nicholson should really be looking at how they support these types of requests instead of a straight no. I was hoping to get some ammunition to go back to with them. I am sure there are other Crest Nicholson developments (flats etc) that gave permission!!
 

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There may be some government, and perhaps local government, guidance on electric vehicle charging provision for new builds. I know that government policy is to encourage this (not sure where it's written down, though !) although it's not yet made its way into building regulations. Might be worth checking with your local authority to see if they have any policy like this. If they have then that might give you some ammunition, even if it isn't something that can be enforced (i.e. it's still just guidance).
 

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We could, but long term I was hoping to have something easy in place so we didn't have to faff about running cables. Its also the principle of the thing - its a new build house and Crest Nicholson should really be looking at how they support these types of requests instead of a straight no. I was hoping to get some ammunition to go back to with them. I am sure there are other Crest Nicholson developments (flats etc) that gave permission!!
Yes, it will be a pain, but once you have established precedence then its time to invest some money in a more capable, safer and convenient setup.
 

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If they've said no on the grounds of health and safety, so long as you propose a professional install that fully complies with all regulations and poses no trip hazard or any other risk, that's probably the test as to whether they're going to engage in good faith.
 

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Should we be shocked that they haven't allowed for charging in these parking bays, considering that sale of new ICE cars will be banned before the house is out of warranty?
 
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