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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm looking to replace a house full of old storage heaters with something, but not sure what...

There is no option of gas, so we are tied to electric heating of some kind, and unfortunately a heat pump setup looks unlikely.

Is anyone aware of a modern take on the storage heater? Ideally we'd want something with a bit more control and I'm thinking that this must be a solved problem by now. Any suggestions?
 

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How well insulated is the house? I'd start there if you are looking to save money and get the house warmer.


If you can't do a heat pump, I'm guessing a wood pellet boiler is out too. There may be some incentives for wood pellets.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
How well insulated is the house? I'd start there if you are looking to save money and get the house warmer.
Pretty well, there's not much to gain in that direction. It's more about having heat when we actually want it that is the problem. The old storage heaters are great at heating the house when nobody is home, then it's stone cold in the evening and you have to put another heater on...
 

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BMW i3 Rex
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I went through this some years ago when my oil-fired boiler actually boiled and cracked and decided that convectors (Dimplex) using on-peak electricity would be as good as storage heaters (at that time). Zone control and very good temperature control combined with the much lower installation costs outweighed the extra cost of on-peak. However its not possible to get very accurate predictions and much relies on guesswork!

In the event our total electricity consumption over the last few years has been around 15000 kWh/pa in a 3/4 bedroom detached house in an exposed rural location in a cool part of the UK. Rather roughly that's 10000 for heating and 5000 for the rest including the car. We don't try to keep the temperature low (old age showing) with the living room normally at 20 C and the rest only a little lower.
 

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The problem with storage heaters is they charge up overnight when the heat losses (proportional to temp difference between inside and outside) are greatest. You can save energy costs by only heating when you need the rooms to be warm.

An air to air heat pump (mini split a/c) can achieve a coefficient of performance (CoP) between 4 and 5. So the cost per kWh of heat is lower than storage heaters running on E7. Portable units have lower CoPs, around 3, but are heating up indoor air which is already warmer with the compromise of being a bit bulkier and noisier.

I'd suggest radiant heaters in bathrooms/cloakrooms - only used when the room's in use.

Wood burning stoves are very effective because of their high output of radiant heat. Costly to install though – mini split air to air heat pumps are about half the installed cost.
 

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Pretty well, there's not much to gain in that direction. It's more about having heat when we actually want it that is the problem. The old storage heaters are great at heating the house when nobody is home, then it's stone cold in the evening and you have to put another heater on...
Do you have open fires, a chimney etc?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Do you have open fires, a chimney etc?
No, and nowhere really suitable for a wood-burning stove etc.

The building is a converted Victorian school, which they did a pretty good job converting in terms of insulation, but the choices are limited in terms of bashing any more holes in walls etc.

[edit, technically it does have a chimney, but it has long since been modified and our front door is now here the fireplace would have been :)]
 

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No, and nowhere really suitable for a wood-burning stove etc.

The building is a converted Victorian school, which they did a pretty good job converting in terms of insulation, but the choices are limited in terms of bashing any more holes in walls etc.
There no fire places anywhere:confused:, surely the victorians would have used them as the main heating source. Do you have the whole building or are we talking about a massive school converted into seperate homes?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
There no fire places anywhere:confused:, surely the victorians would have used them as the main heating source. Do you have the whole building or are we talking about a massive school converted into seperate homes?
Large school converted into several homes, and yes, there are most definitely chimney stacks (and even a bell tower), but there are no fireplaces remaining.
 

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Large school converted into several homes, and yes, there are most definitely chimney stacks (and even a bell tower), but there are no fireplaces remaining.
Why would you do that?:confused: No open fires but still chimneys, that should be a crime:(
Do you have access to your own roof space and can you alter the building in any way? Could you penetrate the chimney in the loft and install a new modern stack internally?
 

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And going even more off topic we're going to have a bonfire in the garden tomorrow and produce lots of CO2 plus carcinogenic benzines etc:rolleyes: Well, its my wife and daughter who are the pyromaniacs - I just do as I'm told.
 

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And going even more off topic we're going to have a bonfire in the garden tomorrow and produce lots of CO2 plus carcinogenic benzines etc:rolleyes: Well, its my wife and daughter who are the pyromaniacs - I just do as I'm told.
"I just do as I'm told" we all understood that as soon as you said "wife":p
 
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