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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I had a Jaguar iPace available as a company car, so decided to have an Andersen A2 charger installed, basically because of aesthetics. The ordering and installation process was very smooth, with no issues. I was unsure if my home setup would cause difficulties. Basically, the original fuse board is under the stairs and would be difficult to run a cable from neatly due to all the hard ceramic flooring. However, the extension to the house resulted in an additional fuse board being installed in the garage. I asked if it would be possible to run the cable from the garage fuse box to A2 charger and this was confirmed as OK. The installation itself took about 3 hours and the A2 worked immediately on the iPace with no issues.

A week later I swapped the car for a 4 year old BMW 530e PHEV. The A2 would not charge it. I took it to a local Tesco to try a PodPoint and that worked fine, so hopefully this eliminated any issues with the car itself.

Andersen (who installed the A2) were excellent in terms of customer support, quickly arranging for a new charger to be sent to my home and the original fitter returned to carry out the replacement. Unfortunately this didn't work. However, we did observe that this time the A2 was behaving strangely, with the main charge 'relay' switching repeatedly for a period of about ten seconds for no reason. The installer did some further investigation and believed that the earthing to the A2 had measurable fluctuating voltage (which of course there shouldn't be on an earth). After some phone calls it was felt that this was a likely cause of problems and that a solution would be to ask the electricity board to come and change the earthing at my property from 'TT' to 'PME'....

The next day, an Andersen expert came out to perform further investigation. I mentioned that we do have some strange phenomena on our road where some houses have issues with touch screen devices when attached to the mains (ie capacitive touch affected) as well as a local radio transmitter (about 500m away) causing a radio station to be heard on some house radiators(!) on my road. I'd experienced an issue where after installing a new AVR for my 5.1 surround system, I could hear the radio station playing through the speakers even when the AVR was in standby mode (I resolved this by adding RF filters on the speaker outputs of the AVR). I mentioned all of this in case there could be any link to the problems I was no having with the A2 charger. After poking around in the garage fuse box, we tried to charge his PHEVand it worked, but absolutely no reason that this worked. Then switched to my 530e and it charged! My friend with a 330e popped round a couple of hours later and I tried the A2 in his car; it wouldn't charge. Plugged it back into the 530e and now it rejected the A2 and wouldn't charge.

The Andersen expert was unsure what was going on, but the next day called me to say that upon reflection, he was "100% sure" that the issue was caused by the local radio transmitter and that I should call environmental health to get them involved.

So, in summary, the A2 charged a BEV faultlessly for 7 days consecutively, but then failed to charge my 530e PHEV.
The installers believed it was an earthing problem ay first and advised I should call my electricity DNO and ask them to change the house earthing from TT to PME. After mentioning the local radio transmitting station and some anecdotal issues about how it affects some houses on our road, Andersen have focused on that and just said to call environmental health. So, I'm stuck with an expensive charger that doesn't work at the moment.

There is a neighbour who has a Tesla and when he's available, will try his car on my charger and see if as a 'BEV' it works, like my iPace did for a full week. Maybe that will help narrow down what's required to make the A2 fail (ie happy with BEVs, but not PHEVs). Note though, that recently, I've heard the charger relay switching frequently for a period without having it connected to a car (tried to attach an MP4 video to this post of this happening, but says the forum won't accept the file extension).

Appreciate any comments on the above, especially if anybody has experienced charger issues with strange earth voltages or issues with RFI from radio transmitters.

Thanks!

Dem
 

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Our A2 charges my wife's ID3 and my PHEV Sorento with no issues at all.

I would hazard a guess that it could be an issue with the BM's software? I can't see what else would prevent one vehicle charging over another as you are charging a battery in both. Is is possible to get another make of PHEV to test charge?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Our A2 charges my wife's ID3 and my PHEV Sorento with no issues at all.

I would hazard a guess that it could be an issue with the BM's software? I can't see what else would prevent one vehicle charging over another as you are charging a battery in both. Is is possible to get another make of PHEV to test charge?
Hi,

Yes, the A2 also charged the Andersen expert's Phev which was a different brand (might have been a Citroën) at the time he was here, but straight after also charged the BMW. The BMW worked fine with a PodPoint charger at Tesco plus has always charged fine for the last 4 years at our office. Really don't believe its the car.

Plus, hearing the A2 main relay switching quickly / randomly when the charger isn't attached to a car (tends to happen when the cable is uncoiled from the charger) means that I really don't think its just the car. The bizzaree thing is the first week of faultless operation when I had the Jaguar iPace.
 

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If anything, TT is a better earthing system for car charging than PME, and I doubt that the car does an earth loop impedance test anyway. Did the installer check this and measure Ra before switching to PME? Should be on the EIC if he/she did.

Radio interference shouldn't be an issue, as all charge points have to be certified as being compliant with the EMC Directive requirements, so that means they will have been tested to ensure they are are resistant to radiated and conducted emissions. Having said that, it is possible that there might be some sort of conducted interference on the supply that is inside the allowable frequency/amplitude range for EMC susceptibility, but which is still enough to cause a problem.

There are some useful clues from the symptoms though. You say that the contactor in the Andersen is closing, then opening, and closing again several times (the clicking noise). That tells us that the charger is OK with the Andersen, and has initially signalled to the charge point that all's well, it's happy with the advertised current, there are no safety issues and that it's requested power. The problem only starts when the charger (in the car) receives power (after that first click from the contactor turning on). Something is causing the charger to signal back to the Andersen that there's a problem and that the power needs to be turned off. This cycle seems to repeat, until, perhaps, the Andersen stops trying to charge on the basis that it's detected several failures to charge in quick succession.

Did the installer test the Andersen with a vehicle simulator box? If so, that should rule out almost all charge point related faults. A vehicle simulator also allows test gear to be connected to see what's actually going on, both in terms of the supply to the vehicle and often it allows monitoring of the pilot signal.

It may be that the BMW 530e is doing something unexpected, and the Andersen has a problem with that. I wonder if there are any other BMW 530e owners here that use an Andersen OK?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If anything, TT is a better earthing system for car charging than PME, and I doubt that the car does an earth loop impedance test anyway. Did the installer check this and measure Ra before switching to PME? Should be on the EIC if he/she did.

Radio interference shouldn't be an issue, as all charge points have to be certified as being compliant with the EMC Directive requirements, so that means they will have been tested to ensure they are are resistant to radiated and conducted emissions. Having said that, it is possible that there might be some sort of conducted interference on the supply that is inside the allowable frequency/amplitude range for EMC susceptibility, but which is still enough to cause a problem.

There are some useful clues from the symptoms though. You say that the contactor in the Andersen is closing, then opening, and closing again several times (the clicking noise). That tells us that the charger is OK with the Andersen, and has initially signalled to the charge point that all's well, it's happy with the advertised current, there are no safety issues and that it's requested power. The problem only starts when the charger (in the car) receives power (after that first click from the contactor turning on). Something is causing the charger to signal back to the Andersen that there's a problem and that the power needs to be turned off. This cycle seems to repeat, until, perhaps, the Andersen stops trying to charge on the basis that it's detected several failures to charge in quick succession.

Did the installer test the Andersen with a vehicle simulator box? If so, that should rule out almost all charge point related faults. A vehicle simulator also allows test gear to be connected to see what's actually going on, both in terms of the supply to the vehicle and often it allows monitoring of the pilot signal.

It may be that the BMW 530e is doing something unexpected, and the Andersen has a problem with that. I wonder if there are any other BMW 530e owners here that use an Andersen OK?
Thanks Jeremy,

I don't have a lot of details from the installers (only what they told me verbally). In terms of the relay switching, it happens randomly, when not connected to the car as well.

Also, there are three lights on the unit that indicate it's status. I believe green is just powered on, yellow is charging and red is error. These should only illuminate separately as far as I know. What the installers observed when they were here was that sometimes the green and yellow would be on. I was playing around with it the other night to see if the charge cable might be like an antenna, picking up RFI. As you can see from the second video link, as I lifted the fully unravelled 8 metre cable up and down, I could get the yellow light to switch on and off!

I've uploaded some videos to YouTube (as can't attach as files here); please see below.

Andersen A2 Charge Relay switching when not connected to car

Andersen A2 EV Charge status light switching on and off

The only other information I can add from the installers is that despite wiring in to the secondary fusebox in the extension garage, earth the resistance value was very low (so no perceived issue there). The only issue was voltage (i think fluctuating), on the earth connection at the A2 charger. Regarding the initial suggestion from the installer to ask our DNO from TT to PME, I'm not convinced about this after a bit of Google research. I'm no expert, but this would only help if there is voltage leaking from the local radio transmitting station into the ground, hence the voltage being measured on the earth to the A2 charger (this was suggested by the installer).

I don't know if they used a simulator box, but I can only say that other than the voltage on the earth line, they were satisfied with the function of the unit. I will ask them for some kind of installation report otherwise I'll have no hope in terms of raising this with Environmental Health if they ask for details on the issue.

Thanks again for your thoughts on this.

Dem
 

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Thanks for recording those videos, they rule out some things for sure. It's very definitely not the charger signalling to the Andersen to turn on/off at all, in fact I don't believe it's anything at all to do with the charger in any car, other than some chargers may possibly provide some sort of screening/filtering that tends to allow the Andersen to work OK.

There would seem to be two possible causes, and only two that I can think of. The first is that the Andersen A2 is faulty, in that it has a manufacturing defect* that is directly causing the problem. As the unit has been swapped, I think this is unlikely (but see note below). The most likely cause would seem to be your suspicion that it's radiated emissions causing the problem. Ignore my previous comment that the charger was initiating the charge OK, I'd not realised that the contactor was turning on and off so fast.

What I believe may be happening is that radiated emissions are getting into the charge lead and causing the Control Pilot signal (the one that turns the charge point on and off and signals the maximum available current to the charger) to "go wild", for want of a better phrase, and feed spurious signals into the charge point circuitry. The control pilot normally either has a DC voltage present, or a 1 kHz pulse train, that has a maximum swing from +12V to -12V (if unloaded). I believe that there is a unwanted susceptibility within the Andersen to radiated emissions getting picked up by the charge cable and being high enough to falsely trigger it to turn the contactor on and off.

I think there may well be a fix for this, if, as I very strongly suspect, the interference is getting in via the Control Pilot. The fix could be as easy as putting some ferrite beads around the single core Control Pilot wire inside the Andersen. Depends on the frequency of the nearby transmitter, though, and fixing radiated emissions induced problems can require a fair bit of trial and error. Do you know the frequency of the transmitter? That may help when it comes trying to find a fix. It may be that the Andersen needs shielding to be fitted, for example, if the interference is being picked up internally (but your cable test seems to suggest it's getting in via the cable). I can give you a steer towards some suitable ferrite beads to put around the CP wire to fix it, but it may mean extending this slightly and adding a few turns around a bead to get enough inductance to keep the RF out of the main board. There's often more art than science in filtering out interference like this



* Just a note to say that, like all electrical products, the Andersen must have gone through electromagnetic compatibility testing, so this should have been picked up as a potential defect during design and development. It may be that the radiated signal strength where you are is greater than the test values though, although my suspicion is that it may have a design problem with EMC.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for recording those videos, they rule out some things for sure. It's very definitely not the charger signalling to the Andersen to turn on/off at all, in fact I don't believe it's anything at all to do with the charger in any car, other than some chargers may possibly provide some sort of screening/filtering that tends to allow the Andersen to work OK.

There would seem to be two possible causes, and only two that I can think of. The first is that the Andersen A2 is faulty, in that it has a manufacturing defect* that is directly causing the problem. As the unit has been swapped, I think this is unlikely (but see note below). The most likely cause would seem to be your suspicion that it's radiated emissions causing the problem. Ignore my previous comment that the charger was initiating the charge OK, I'd not realised that the contactor was turning on and off so fast.

What I believe may be happening is that radiated emissions are getting into the charge lead and causing the Control Pilot signal (the one that turns the charge point on and off and signals the maximum available current to the charger) to "go wild", for want of a better phrase, and feed spurious signals into the charge point circuitry. The control pilot normally either has a DC voltage present, or a 1 kHz pulse train, that has a maximum swing from +12V to -12V (if unloaded). I believe that there is a unwanted susceptibility within the Andersen to radiated emissions getting picked up by the charge cable and being high enough to falsely trigger it to turn the contactor on and off.

I think there may well be a fix for this, if, as I very strongly suspect, the interference is getting in via the Control Pilot. The fix could be as easy as putting some ferrite beads around the single core Control Pilot wire inside the Andersen. Depends on the frequency of the nearby transmitter, though, and fixing radiated emissions induced problems can require a fair bit of trial and error. Do you know the frequency of the transmitter? That may help when it comes trying to find a fix. It may be that the Andersen needs shielding to be fitted, for example, if the interference is being picked up internally (but your cable test seems to suggest it's getting in via the cable). I can give you a steer towards some suitable ferrite beads to put around the CP wire to fix it, but it may mean extending this slightly and adding a few turns around a bead to get enough inductance to keep the RF out of the main board. There's often more art than science in filtering out interference like this



* Just a note to say that, like all electrical products, the Andersen must have gone through electromagnetic compatibility testing, so this should have been picked up as a potential defect during design and development. It may be that the radiated signal strength where you are is greater than the test values though, although my suspicion is that it may have a design problem with EMC.
Hi, no problem and glad the videos give a better explanation. Of course, I'm still baffled why the charger worked for a week with the iPace with no issues at all. I know with EMC / RFI it's a black art and can be a bit random (I've worked for an automotive component supplier for about 25 years and had my fair share of involvement in EMC issues), but to be OK for a week and then cause problems consistently for weeks now, is a bit strange. Also, that even when the contactor isn't seemingly being affected, the A2 will not charge the BMWs when the cable is attached

I do tend to agree with you that it's likely that something is getting in via the charge cable, based on the effect it had on the status lights just be me raising and lowering it. However, again, why didn't this happen in the first week when I had the iPace?

In terms of the known interference issues affecting domestic appliances here, I added TDK RFI filters (TDK-Lambda Power Line Filter, Noise Filter for use with Power Supply RS Stock No.:135-7186Mfr. Part No.:RSAL-2003W) to the existing speaker wires on my 5.1 surround system (see attached image). I had previously tried ferrite beads without success (think suggestion was Type 22?), but decided to keep them on as well as assumed they couldn't hurt. With the four main speaker cables modified to have the filters in series, the broadcast from Radio Lyca 1458 AM was no longer audible, even with my ear against a speaker. Lyca 1458 kHz is transmitted from Brookmans Park at 125 kW effective maximum radiated power. I was actually in contact with Marantz over the lack of EMC / RFI robustness in their latest AVR, but as you can imagine, they referred to having passed CE requirements...... I also contacted RTIS and OFCOM, but no joy (seems their interest is only if your enjoyment of a Radio station is suffering due to interference....). As you mentioned, given the issues that have occurred at a few houses along this road, I have to assume that the radiated emissions here are higher than normal (so I have now raised this with Environmental Health...).

I'm looking forward to trying out my neighbour's Tesla on this charger when he returns from holiday next week. Also, hopefully trying the BMW hybrid on his charger to see what happens. He's 5 houses along from me, so I'd home a similar situation in terms of EMC / RFI strength from the transmitter.

I totally agree that you'd home that the A2 unit had more robustness against EMC. However, I don't know how much appetite they'll have to work on this, just because of something I've raised. Interestingly, Miele were quite keen to work on one of our neighbour's new ovens and referred to one known incident in Germany where the oven touch screen wouldn't function correctly and was eventually traced to RFI from a nearby transmitting station....

Thanks again for your input and advice and I'll post updates on here.
 

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My inclination would be to get some ferrite beads and just slip them over the CP wire inside the Andersen. It's the thinner wire fitted to the left-most terminal on the vehicle cable side in the unit. If there's enough slack to get one or two turns of the CP wire around the ferrite bead then that would make it more effective at keeping RF out.

The difference between cars may well just be down to how they terminate the CP at the frequency of the radiated emission that's causing the problem. All chargers just load the CP to signal to the charge point when they are ready for power, and it's essentially a DC/very low frequency signally system. I know that some chargers include a bit of basic RF filtering on the CP at that end, and it may well be that whatever the I-Pace charger does is good enough to attenuate the interference being picked up by the cable to a level where it doesn't upset the Andersen. The Andersen should really have better immunity to RF though, as what it's doing is potentially dangerous, as every time the contactor clicks in it's making the connector live, and one of the provisions within IEC62196 (the standard that sets the protocol for charge points and charger interfaces) is that the charge point should never make the connector live without a valid command from the vehicle side.

I think there's a case for getting Andersen to sort this, even if your installation is unusually close to a transmitter. It's not really acceptable to have this sort of susceptibility to interference from a safety viewpoint, let alone a functional one. Andersen must have undertaken radiated and conducted EMC testing, I'm sure, as I doubt they could CE mark the thing without having had this done. Might be an idea to ask them for a copy of their EMC compliance chit, just to be sure that it was done properly. There's no screening within the enclosure on the Andersen as I recall, I seem to remember that it's all a plastic moulding, except the front fascia panel. I guess it's possible that radiated interference is getting in directly, but the fact that it worked OK with the I-Pace suggests that it's getting in via the cable, and the most likely culprit will be the CP core in the cable, simply because it's directly connected in to the sensing circuitry on the control board.
 

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@Dem ,

Just had another thought. Might be worth fitting one or two split ferrite cores over the charge cable, as close to the point where it exits the gland inside the Andersen as possible. Not sure of the cable size on the Andersen, but either of the two linked below might be worth a go. If the smaller one will fit (measure the cable to check first) then that might be better. You may need a couple of them to provide enough attenuation, and as always with RF interference there is a chance that this won't work at all. These are easy and non-invasive to try, though, as they can just be clipped over the charge cable and slid up it. With luck, they may be slim enough to fit through the cable winding slot.


 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
My inclination would be to get some ferrite beads and just slip them over the CP wire inside the Andersen. It's the thinner wire fitted to the left-most terminal on the vehicle cable side in the unit. If there's enough slack to get one or two turns of the CP wire around the ferrite bead then that would make it more effective at keeping RF out.

The difference between cars may well just be down to how they terminate the CP at the frequency of the radiated emission that's causing the problem. All chargers just load the CP to signal to the charge point when they are ready for power, and it's essentially a DC/very low frequency signally system. I know that some chargers include a bit of basic RF filtering on the CP at that end, and it may well be that whatever the I-Pace charger does is good enough to attenuate the interference being picked up by the cable to a level where it doesn't upset the Andersen. The Andersen should really have better immunity to RF though, as what it's doing is potentially dangerous, as every time the contactor clicks in it's making the connector live, and one of the provisions within IEC62196 (the standard that sets the protocol for charge points and charger interfaces) is that the charge point should never make the connector live without a valid command from the vehicle side.

I think there's a case for getting Andersen to sort this, even if your installation is unusually close to a transmitter. It's not really acceptable to have this sort of susceptibility to interference from a safety viewpoint, let alone a functional one. Andersen must have undertaken radiated and conducted EMC testing, I'm sure, as I doubt they could CE mark the thing without having had this done. Might be an idea to ask them for a copy of their EMC compliance chit, just to be sure that it was done properly. There's no screening within the enclosure on the Andersen as I recall, I seem to remember that it's all a plastic moulding, except the front fascia panel. I guess it's possible that radiated interference is getting in directly, but the fact that it worked OK with the I-Pace suggests that it's getting in via the cable, and the most likely culprit will be the CP core in the cable, simply because it's directly connected in to the sensing circuitry on the control board.
Thanks again for the feedback and I'll definitely follow up with Andersen ref immunity to RFI / EMC. As regards the unit itself, you're right in that I think it's mostly a plastic box, so no obvious physical shielding. I wonder if there is any option for a better shielded Type 2 tethered cable? I don't want to fiddle with the installation myself at this stage as I don't want to invalidate any warranty I have for the unit and installation from Andersen. Actually, I'm not sure I have any paperwork at all from them regarding warranties.....that's something to follow up on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
@Dem ,

Just had another thought. Might be worth fitting one or two split ferrite cores over the charge cable, as close to the point where it exits the gland inside the Andersen as possible. Not sure of the cable size on the Andersen, but either of the two linked below might be worth a go. If the smaller one will fit (measure the cable to check first) then that might be better. You may need a couple of them to provide enough attenuation, and as always with RF interference there is a chance that this won't work at all. These are easy and non-invasive to try, though, as they can just be clipped over the charge cable and slid up it. With luck, they may be slim enough to fit through the cable winding slot.


What I might do is see if Andersen are willing to try this or some alterative EMC protection with the unit (as mentioned, I don't really want to open it up myself and potentially invalidate any warranty at this time).
 

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Thanks again for the feedback and I'll definitely follow up with Andersen ref immunity to RFI / EMC. As regards the unit itself, you're right in that I think it's mostly a plastic box, so no obvious physical shielding. I wonder if there is any option for a better shielded Type 2 tethered cable? I don't want to fiddle with the installation myself at this stage as I don't want to invalidate any warranty I have for the unit and installation from Andersen. Actually, I'm not sure I have any paperwork at all from them regarding warranties.....that's something to follow up on.

I'm not aware of any charge cables that include screening/shielding, but there are tubular braids available that can be slid over cables to provide this. TBH, I think that's probably pretty impractical for a cable like this, as well as being unsightly, and it would need the charge cable to be disconnected for the braid to be slid over the end.

The clip-on ferrite core option wouldn't invalidate any warranty and probably wouldn't mean even removing the fascia panel, I think. Just unwinding the cable fully, then clipping one or two cores as close as possible to the Andersen end of the cable might be enough to do the job.

Good idea to get Andersen on the case, too, as I think there may well be an issue here with whether or not their product is adequately immune from radiated emissions. Might be worth stressing the safety issue, as it seems that stray emissions can make the connector live, not something that's particularly desirable.
 

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I'm not aware of any charge cables that include screening/shielding, but there are tubular braids available that can be slid over cables to provide this. TBH, I think that's probably pretty impractical for a cable like this, as well as being unsightly, and it would need the charge cable to be disconnected for the braid to be slid over the end.

The clip-on ferrite core option wouldn't invalidate any warranty and probably wouldn't mean even removing the fascia panel, I think. Just unwinding the cable fully, then clipping one or two cores as close as possible to the Andersen end of the cable might be enough to do the job.

Good idea to get Andersen on the case, too, as I think there may well be an issue here with whether or not their product is adequately immune from radiated emissions. Might be worth stressing the safety issue, as it seems that stray emissions can make the connector live, not something that's particularly desirable.
The curious thing is that your iPace charged ok. Are you still able to get your friend with the M3 to try your charger. Might if course just be coincidental.
There is also something in your post about voltages on the earth wire. What instrument was being used to measure this. How was the earth loop impedance measured ?
 

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The curious thing is that your iPace charged ok. Are you still able to get your friend with the M3 to try your charger. Might if course just be coincidental.
There is also something in your post about voltages on the earth wire. What instrument was being used to measure this. How was the earth loop impedance measured ?

It wasn't my I-Pace, but the OP's.

I'm pretty sure the issue is related to the way that different cars implement the CP termination. I know that some include some filtering, usually a low value capacitor between CP and vehicle ground, and that might just be enough to attenuate whatever is being picked up by the cable. It could be something really subtle related to the specific frequency of the interference and the apparent impedance seen by the vehicle end of the cable being just enough to allow the Andersen to work. The standard interface does show this capacitor that can only be there for EMC reasons, I think, but doesn't give it a value:

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The curious thing is that your iPace charged ok. Are you still able to get your friend with the M3 to try your charger. Might if course just be coincidental.
There is also something in your post about voltages on the earth wire. What instrument was being used to measure this. How was the earth loop impedance measured ?
Hi, unfortunately, no idea what Andersen used for their measurements, but I'm hoping that I can get some kind of documented report from them. Ref my friend's car, it's a 330e rather than my 530e, but really think it will just be the same if I try it again (as its basically the same car as mine).

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Just an update on a few things I tried over the weekend to try and get a bit of a pattern with the charger and the BMW 530e.

Firstly, I ordered 5 of the ferrite cores suggested with a 13mm diameter opening and applied two of them in series as close to the connection point in the charger as possible (as per photo attached). I left the cable completely unravelled, plugged it into the car and it charged fine. I only stopped charging after about 30 minutes as my neighbour with the Tesla let me pop over to his to try his charger (it's a Tesla wall box). Unfortunately, this didn't work for me. The BMW LED at the charging port remained white as if the car and charger wouldn't recognise each other at all. If there was a communication error it would flash yellow. So, I'm guessing that the Tesla home wall charger isn't compatible with a BMW PHEV?

We then went to a charge point at his company up the road, which is a bit further away from the radio transmitting station (maybe 800 metres away, whereby my house is probably ~250m away). The BMW charged fine on that charger.

I then returned home, plugged the Andersen charger in and the BMW continued to charge fine until it was 100%.

I tried the charger again today and had some problems / success in terms of how the charger behaves in different situations.

1) I think the 2 ferrite cores are a red herring as I removed them and the behaviour of the A2 with the BMW remains the same (as per the behaviours listed in the next points below).

2) The charge cable needs to be fully unraveled from the A2 in order to work with the BMW.

3) If the majority of the cable is coiled around the A2, the BMW 'rejects' the A2 charger indicated by just a few blue LED flashes, then yellow flashes.

4) If starting charging the BMW with the cable fully unraveled, then coiling as much of the cable as possible around the charger, the charging process will stop fairly quickly.

5) Whether charging or rejected by the BMW, disconnecting the cable from the car will cause the contactor to switch rapidly, nearly always resulting in the A2 stopping with the red LED flashing. The A2 can only be restarted by switching the mains fuse off and back on in the garage fuse box.

6) Also, if the cable is left on the floor fully unravelled when turning the fuse off and on, the contactor will start switching again, until the A2 has an error again. It seems that only having the cable coiled around the A2 when turning the fuse off and on, will not cause the contactor to start switching straight away. Then, when unravelling the cable, if the contactor suddenly starts switching, plugging it into the car will cause the contactor to stop switching and work correctly (however, to achieve charging, the cable would then need to be quickly unraveled completely from the A2.

7) The A2 contactor only seems to go wild when the charge cable is removed from my BMW PHEV, but not when it's removed from a pure BEV. Also, when the contactor is switching rapidly, plugging the cable into a car (PHEV or BEV) makes it stable and stops it switching.

So, in classic automotive style, it feels like I'm able to switch the problem on and off based on the cable being fully unraveled from the A2 in terms of charging. However, the downside is that when unraveled and not charging (ie when disconnecting it from the car) the contactor starts switching rapidly until an error state occurs in the A2 charger (and can only be reset by turning the main fuse in the fuse box off and back on).

So, I've advised Andersen of this and let's see what's suggested.


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