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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Pulled out my service booklet today to arrange the next service and was annoyed to realise I didn't have a service last year. No idea why, but totally slipped my mind. Then annoyed to find that my local Nissan garage now wants £209 to basically change the screen wash and even more annoyed to have it confirmed that my battery warranty is now cancelled. Not great, especially as it is a 30 kWhr battery sat on 83% after 4 years.
 

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Nissan Leaf Accenta 30kWh, 3.3kW, 2017
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If the battery warranty is now cancelled, I don't see the point in servicing with them now. The only thing I wouldn't be happy doing myself is changing the brake fluid every 2-3 years', otherwise I think everything else you can do yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If the battery warranty is now cancelled, I don't see the point in servicing with them now. The only thing I wouldn't be happy doing myself is changing the brake fluid every 2-3 years', otherwise I think everything else you can do yourself.
Yes, I have just been thinking that. I have a local garage that serviced our ICE car for a fraction of the cost and will do the MOT for £40 as opposed to £65 at the Nissan dealership. The Nissan guy said he would check with his Boss about the warranty, but if it comes back as a no I will simply get it serviced by the local guy. I suppose it doesn't really matter as the Leaf is now our second car used as a local runabout that I will keep for several more years. I was just looking forward to seeing the battery pack replaced in 4 years time. Perhaps the aftermarket battery service world will have sorted itself out by then and I can just go to my local garage and get a few cells changed.
 

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Pulled out my service booklet today to arrange the next service and was annoyed to realise I didn't have a service last year. No idea why, but totally slipped my mind. Then annoyed to find that my local Nissan garage now wants £209 to basically change the screen wash and even more annoyed to have it confirmed that my battery warranty is now cancelled. Not great, especially as it is a 30 kWhr battery sat on 83% after 4 years.
Do you have the battery warranty "cancellation" in writing ? Does it have any legal standing ? Given that the "servicing" of a Leaf doesn't touch the battery or high voltage system they may be on shaky ground legally. Eg how can you justify invalidating the warranty of a battery because the brake fluid wasn't changed ?

Did they give you any warning that they were going to "cancel" the warranty or just sit there silently and allow it to lapse, rubbing their hands together ?

What happens if you were to buy a second hand Leaf and the previous owner had not kept up with the servicing ? Somebody really needs to challenge this kind of nonsense before EV's get more mainstream.
 

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Leaf 30kWh, HS PHEV
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I chose to not have Nissan dealer service this year - if we get to battery warranty issues, we shall see what happens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I totally agree. Unfortunately the wording in the booklet titled 'Periodic Maintenance Service' says 'The periodic maintenance services are a minimum requirement for warranty' It's ridiculous as you note, especially as they don't actually do any maintenance on the battery at any point. I'm guessing that if you buy a second hand leaf without a full service history, then it wouldn't be covered.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I chose to not have Nissan dealer service this year - if we get to battery warranty issues, we shall see what happens.
I think you should be OK. I couldn't find anywhere in the service book that says you have to have it done by a Nissan dealer, it just says, several times, that it is highly recommended
 

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Leaf 30kWh, HS PHEV
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I think you should be OK. I couldn't find anywhere in the service book that says you have to have it done by a Nissan dealer, it just says, several times, that it is highly recommended
this year I have gotten new tyres installed (plus additional front set + tracking last month) and gotten brake fluids changed with MOT. Going to change the cabin filter myself - just need to do it.
 

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Given that the "servicing" of a Leaf doesn't touch the battery or high voltage system they may be on shaky ground legally. Eg how can you justify invalidating the warranty of a battery because the brake fluid wasn't changed ?
My guess is they'd argue it based on this:
137285

From Book a Service | Nissan Service Care

I couldn't find anywhere in the service book that says you have to have it done by a Nissan dealer, it just says, several times, that it is highly recommended
Pretty sure there is an EU law that says that they can't force you to use a Nissan dealer, but the work must follow Nissan's servicing requirements. I think finance agreements can force you to use a main dealer though, but don't quote me on that.
 

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And I would argue that running a diagnostic tool on the battery to check the SoH and cell balance is not "servicing" it, any more than running an OBD-II diagnostic tool on an ICE vehicle to check for fault codes is. Otherwise me running Leafspy is "servicing" the car. :p There isn't even a battery cooling system in a Leaf which could need fluid replacement. There is literally nothing for them to do for the battery other than run a diagnostic scan.

At some point in the future someone is going to take EV makers to court over this I suspect, as tying battery warranties into unrelated servicing is an anticompetitive scam...
 

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But imagine the argument you'd have to have with Nissan if you actually had to use the battery warranty.

I'd put it down to experience and then put the money you would have spent on servicing into a pot for future repairs. If a cell fails, you can then go to one of these specialists who can replace it for a fraction that Nissan would charge.

See here:
 

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And I would argue that running a diagnostic tool on the battery to check the SoH and cell balance is not "servicing" it, any more than running an OBD-II diagnostic tool on an ICE vehicle to check for fault codes is. Otherwise me running Leafspy is "servicing" the car. :p
If you can prove that it was done and documented to the standard required by Nissan, then your argument is solid. Regardless, I'd be very interested to hear how the conversation goes.

For the record, I have zero knowledge of what the actual requirements set out by Nissan are - my previous post was based purely on what they list on their website as a minor service. I also don't know if Nissan would need to prove that the servicing requirements are reasonable if a thrown out warranty claim ever makes it to the courts. I also don't know what happens when EU laws get flung out of the UK window.

Basically, don't listen to me, I'm just throwing out an opinion.
 

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this year I have gotten new tyres installed (plus additional front set + tracking last month) and gotten brake fluids changed with MOT. Going to change the cabin filter myself - just need to do it.
I do the cabin filters every Spring on my cars, the wife's Panda is absolutely horrendous to change, I struggled for about half a day and gave up in the end. The body contortions require a much younger physique than my old bones can manage, I was sore for three days afterwards.

I took it to a local garage and presented them with a set of filters, while I was chatting to one mechanic, another had got into the cabin and changed it within 2 minutes. How piss*d off was I with that. To add insult to injury they didn't even charge me anything for their trouble. All I had in my wallet was a tenner, I would have cheerfully given them a couple of twenties. In case there is anyone here in my neck of the woods, it's Upton Garage Poole.
The Leaf is a piece of cake, no trouble at all to replace the cabin filter.
 

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But imagine the argument you'd have to have with Nissan if you actually had to use the battery warranty.

I'd put it down to experience and then put the money you would have spent on servicing into a pot for future repairs. If a cell fails, you can then go to one of these specialists who can replace it for a fraction that Nissan would charge.
I think people need to understand better where I'm coming from.

I'm not saying we all defiantly refuse to take our EV's to be "serviced" and then try to take Nissan or whoever to court when they refuse to repair a battery under warranty. Like most people, I will be very grudgingly taking my Leaf to its next service to "maintain" the battery warranty, because the battery is a very important expensive part of the car, is known to degrade on Leaf's in particular, and I don't have the time or will to fight a court battles over something like this, nor am I a lawyer.

However as a general principle I think it's important that people do push back on this, especially if they find themselves in the position of being without a "warranty" because legally speaking, EV manufacturers don't really have a leg to stand on, at least in the UK thanks to the Consumer Rights Act.

A lot of people just aren't aware that you have rights outside of a manufacturers voluntary "warranty", and these rights trump any arbitrary made up caveats the manufacturer might try to impose such as "we're not going to replace your failed 4 year old £8000 battery under warranty because you forgot to let us charge you to change your pollen filter at the 3 year service".

Goods whether bought new or second hand have to be of satisfactory condition and "fit for purpose" for up to 5 years in Scotland and 6 years in the rest of the UK and a battery failing within this time period through normal use without any abuse would surely count as an EV that can only do a fraction of its range at 4 years old due to a fault in an £8000 component of the car which should last at least 10 years would not be deemed to be "fit for purpose" under the law.

Would you have to remind Nissan of their legal obligations under the Consumer Rights Act ? Sure. Would you need to threaten to take them to court or actually take them to court over it ? Probably. Would you succeed ? Maybe.

Manufacturers of all kinds of equipment routinely try to dodge and wriggle out of their responsibilities under the Consumer Rights act and try to pretend that their voluntary warranty is the only protection you have and most of the time nobody challenges them because it's too much hassle so they get away with it. But for something as expensive as a traction battery it may be worth the fight if it came to it.

Invalidating a traction battery "warranty" simply due to the owner forgetting a minor service (pretty much just a pollen filter change and kicking the tyres) is unconscionable and I don't think anyone here would agree that this is acceptable or that we should be allowing manufacturers to set this kind of precedent to ensure servicing lock in.

If something that actually affected the traction batteries health was neglected - such as a scheduled coolant change for the battery and then it leaked and damaged the battery then fair dos, but there is NOTHING in the Leaf service schedule that has anything to do with maintaining the health of the battery.

"Battery usage and consult diagnosis" is NOT servicing the battery. It is doing a glorified Leafspy check and in no way preserves the health of the battery. It is like saying walking around the car and visually inspecting the tyres for low tread or damage is "maintaining" the tyres. It's simply an inspection, like checking brakes/tyres, nothing more.

Another factor to consider on the overall EV adoption front is that people are rightfully wary of battery life of EV's at the moment, which is why most EV manufacturers are offering a separate "battery warranty" or "High voltage system warranty" beyond the normal warranty period of the car. This kind of additional warranty is something that is not routinely done on ICE vehicles.

Buyers feel comforted by this additional warranty for the battery especially when buying second hand, (8 years and 100k miles on a 30kWh Leaf) however if the validity of this warranty can be silently and unilaterally withdrawn by the manufacturer due to a previous owner forgetting one minor service then this is a really bad situation for the second hand market. Not only do buyers need to beware of this but they would need to check with the manufacturer before buying second hand to see if the battery "warranty" is still valid. Does anyone actually do this ? Or are there a lot of second hand EV drivers setting themselves up for a huge disappointment if they have a battery warranty claim later ?

Imagine if you buy a 2nd hand well cared for EV at 4 years old, you see a service book with some stamps in it, aren't familiar with all the intricacies of the servicing periods, believe that the battery is still within warranty, take it diligently to the next two services but then when a fault occurs get a "sorry mate, not under warranty anymore as the previous owner missed one insignificant service". Is this right ? Is this legal ? Under the Consumer Rights act I don't believe this is even legal if the fault occurs within the 5/6 year period mentioned by the act.

It's also interesting to note that Tesla - who sometimes get a bad rap on the repair front, have explicitly said you don't need to have the car serviced to maintain the warranty. So why does forgetting a pollen filter change minor service on a Leaf "invalidate" the battery warranty ?

Lets not all just roll over and let manufacturers set the precedent that EV's need frequent and expensive "servicing" under threat of your battery warranty being invalidated. There needs to be some push back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I think people need to understand better where I'm coming from.

I'm not saying we all defiantly refuse to take our EV's to be "serviced" and then try to take Nissan or whoever to court when they refuse to repair a battery under warranty. Like most people, I will be very grudgingly taking my Leaf to its next service to "maintain" the battery warranty, because the battery is a very important expensive part of the car, is known to degrade on Leaf's in particular, and I don't have the time or will to fight a court battles over something like this, nor am I a lawyer.

However as a general principle I think it's important that people do push back on this, especially if they find themselves in the position of being without a "warranty" because legally speaking, EV manufacturers don't really have a leg to stand on, at least in the UK thanks to the Consumer Rights Act.

A lot of people just aren't aware that you have rights outside of a manufacturers voluntary "warranty", and these rights trump any arbitrary made up caveats the manufacturer might try to impose such as "we're not going to replace your failed 4 year old £8000 battery under warranty because you forgot to let us charge you to change your pollen filter at the 3 year service".

Goods whether bought new or second hand have to be of satisfactory condition and "fit for purpose" for up to 5 years in Scotland and 6 years in the rest of the UK and a battery failing within this time period through normal use without any abuse would surely count as an EV that can only do a fraction of its range at 4 years old due to a fault in an £8000 component of the car which should last at least 10 years would not be deemed to be "fit for purpose" under the law.

Would you have to remind Nissan of their legal obligations under the Consumer Rights Act ? Sure. Would you need to threaten to take them to court or actually take them to court over it ? Probably. Would you succeed ? Maybe.

Manufacturers of all kinds of equipment routinely try to dodge and wriggle out of their responsibilities under the Consumer Rights act and try to pretend that their voluntary warranty is the only protection you have and most of the time nobody challenges them because it's too much hassle so they get away with it. But for something as expensive as a traction battery it may be worth the fight if it came to it.

Invalidating a traction battery "warranty" simply due to the owner forgetting a minor service (pretty much just a pollen filter change and kicking the tyres) is unconscionable and I don't think anyone here would agree that this is acceptable or that we should be allowing manufacturers to set this kind of precedent to ensure servicing lock in.

If something that actually affected the traction batteries health was neglected - such as a scheduled coolant change for the battery and then it leaked and damaged the battery then fair dos, but there is NOTHING in the Leaf service schedule that has anything to do with maintaining the health of the battery.

"Battery usage and consult diagnosis" is NOT servicing the battery. It is doing a glorified Leafspy check and in no way preserves the health of the battery. It is like saying walking around the car and visually inspecting the tyres for low tread or damage is "maintaining" the tyres. It's simply an inspection, like checking brakes/tyres, nothing more.

Another factor to consider on the overall EV adoption front is that people are rightfully wary of battery life of EV's at the moment, which is why most EV manufacturers are offering a separate "battery warranty" or "High voltage system warranty" beyond the normal warranty period of the car. This kind of additional warranty is something that is not routinely done on ICE vehicles.

Buyers feel comforted by this additional warranty for the battery especially when buying second hand, (8 years and 100k miles on a 30kWh Leaf) however if the validity of this warranty can be silently and unilaterally withdrawn by the manufacturer due to a previous owner forgetting one minor service then this is a really bad situation for the second hand market. Not only do buyers need to beware of this but they would need to check with the manufacturer before buying second hand to see if the battery "warranty" is still valid. Does anyone actually do this ? Or are there a lot of second hand EV drivers setting themselves up for a huge disappointment if they have a battery warranty claim later ?

Imagine if you buy a 2nd hand well cared for EV at 4 years old, you see a service book with some stamps in it, aren't familiar with all the intricacies of the servicing periods, believe that the battery is still within warranty, take it diligently to the next two services but then when a fault occurs get a "sorry mate, not under warranty anymore as the previous owner missed one insignificant service". Is this right ? Is this legal ? Under the Consumer Rights act I don't believe this is even legal if the fault occurs within the 5/6 year period mentioned by the act.

It's also interesting to note that Tesla - who sometimes get a bad rap on the repair front, have explicitly said you don't need to have the car serviced to maintain the warranty. So why does forgetting a pollen filter change minor service on a Leaf "invalidate" the battery warranty ?

Lets not all just roll over and let manufacturers set the precedent that EV's need frequent and expensive "servicing" under threat of your battery warranty being invalidated. There needs to be some push back.
I agree, I'm going to write to Nissan about this, asking them to put in writing that the warranty is now invalid and what activities in the minor service specifically related to maintaining the warranty.
 

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The problem here is vehicle dealerships are now so reliant on the income stream from the inflated service charges gained by their service department that they need to replace this income stream with something else.
ICE cars require far more maintenance and servicing than their EV equivalents, which in the last few decades have been a guaranteed income stream for the corporatized shareholder-driven dealerships.

With EV's the managements of the massive dealerships struggle to justify the same amount of servicing costs to the customer so this blatant attempt at a sort of blackmail.

The dealerships are unable to survive in their present form with expensive glossy showrooms, smart young ladies in stiletto heels and comfy lounge areas with tea and coffee laid on for the customers from vehicle sales alone. The major profits come from after-sales service.
The only solution as I see it are massive downsizing and redundancies unless they bite the bullet and invest in battery replacement for the EV fleet of vehicles as they age.

Will they do this? Not a chance. They will always try the easy way out by attempting to prize ever more money for nothing out of the customer.

Just my 2 bob's worth, Cheers Tony.
 
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That's the problem in a nutshell @Barfly, the turkeys don't want to vote for thanksgiving, and while I'm not unsympathetic to the plight of people losing their jobs and business's having to downsize, that is the reality of the situation when technological change and progress happens - sometimes people whose lively-hood comes from servicing the old technology find themselves out of a job or having to retrain. Adapt, retrain and keep up, or fall by the wayside. It's the cycle of life in a technological world, and clinging to the past won't save you.

Once upon a time there was a great demand for phone operators to manually switch everyone's calls, then automatic phone exchanges came along and suddenly a lot of telephone operators were out of work or having to retrain. Should the progress of technology have been blocked or stifled so that the phone operators could keep their jobs ? Would we want to go back to a manual phone system today ? Could we even if we wanted to ?

From about the 1960's to around 2000 you had TV technicians beavering away repairing and maintaining CRT based televisions - initially based on valves, then discrete semiconductors, then integrated circuits, but as long as a CRT remained in the design they were somewhat repairable and maintainable (and in need of repairs) so there was a thriving job market for those who repaired them. LCD panels and continuous shrinking and integration of circuitry pretty much killed that as LCD TV's became more and more integrated and less and less repairable beginning in the mid 2000's.

Today a TV is a huge LCD screen on a frame that is 80% of the cost of the entire TV and there are two very small PCB's about the size of paperback books screwed to the back of the screen - one a power supply and the other a signal board which is totally surface mount integrated circuits with essentially no repairable components on them and no circuit diagrams available even if you wanted to try. Repairing a modern LCD TV is essentially down to board swapping or swapping a cracked screen and that's about it. No real troubleshooting skills required and nothing you can really do apart from swap a board etc.

Pretty much over night the whole "local" TV repair service industry collapsed as technology moved on and things have become largely uneconomic or feasible to repair aside from module swapping. My Dad repaired TV's (among many other kinds of electronics) for many years but thankfully retired before the end of the CRT era. I learnt how to repair CRT TV's from him as a hobby when I was young - back in the days where you could pick up an older faulty TV for a steal, repair it yourself and have a good working TV. I even used to component level repair CRT monitors 20 years ago when I worked in a computer repair shop and I was the only one on staff who could - everyone else there just did computer repairs and didn't have a clue about monitors. Today those skills I learnt specific to CRT TV's and monitors are completely useless for modern LCD TV's and monitors. Time has moved on and I've moved on to different things.

It truly is adapt or die and fortunately for car dealers while EV's are a lot less maintenance needy compared to ICE vehicles, the transition is not quite as abrupt as going from old CRT TV's to todays modern zero maintenance and just swap a board TV's - there is still quite a lot of stuff in an EV that can genuinely be repaired and maintained like brakes, suspension, steering, heater/aircon, back up cameras etc etc... EV's remove only the combustion engine drive train, not the rest of the car. But they will need to downsize and retrain.
 

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That's the problem in a nutshell @Barfly, the turkeys don't want to vote for thanksgiving, and while I'm not unsympathetic to the plight of people losing their jobs and business's having to downsize, that is the reality of the situation when technological change and progress happens - sometimes people whose lively-hood comes from servicing the old technology find themselves out of a job or having to retrain. Adapt, retrain and keep up, or fall by the wayside. It's the cycle of life in a technological world, and clinging to the past won't save you.

Once upon a time there was a great demand for phone operators to manually switch everyone's calls, then automatic phone exchanges came along and suddenly a lot of telephone operators were out of work or having to retrain. Should the progress of technology have been blocked or stifled so that the phone operators could keep their jobs ? Would we want to go back to a manual phone system today ? Could we even if we wanted to ?

From about the 1960's to around 2000 you had TV technicians beavering away repairing and maintaining CRT based televisions - initially based on valves, then discrete semiconductors, then integrated circuits, but as long as a CRT remained in the design they were somewhat repairable and maintainable (and in need of repairs) so there was a thriving job market for those who repaired them. LCD panels and continuous shrinking and integration of circuitry pretty much killed that as LCD TV's became more and more integrated and less and less repairable beginning in the mid 2000's.

Today a TV is a huge LCD screen on a frame that is 80% of the cost of the entire TV and there are two very small PCB's about the size of paperback books screwed to the back of the screen - one a power supply and the other a signal board which is totally surface mount integrated circuits with essentially no repairable components on them and no circuit diagrams available even if you wanted to try. Repairing a modern LCD TV is essentially down to board swapping or swapping a cracked screen and that's about it. No real troubleshooting skills required and nothing you can really do apart from swap a board etc.

Pretty much over night the whole "local" TV repair service industry collapsed as technology moved on and things have become largely uneconomic or feasible to repair aside from module swapping. My Dad repaired TV's (among many other kinds of electronics) for many years but thankfully retired before the end of the CRT era. I learnt how to repair CRT TV's from him as a hobby when I was young - back in the days where you could pick up an older faulty TV for a steal, repair it yourself and have a good working TV. I even used to component level repair CRT monitors 20 years ago when I worked in a computer repair shop and I was the only one on staff who could - everyone else there just did computer repairs and didn't have a clue about monitors. Today those skills I learnt specific to CRT TV's and monitors are completely useless for modern LCD TV's and monitors. Time has moved on and I've moved on to different things.

It truly is adapt or die and fortunately for car dealers while EV's are a lot less maintenance needy compared to ICE vehicles, the transition is not quite as abrupt as going from old CRT TV's to todays modern zero maintenance and just swap a board TV's - there is still quite a lot of stuff in an EV that can genuinely be repaired and maintained like brakes, suspension, steering, heater/aircon, back up cameras etc etc... EV's remove only the combustion engine drive train, not the rest of the car. But they will need to downsize and retrain.
My situation is almost identical to your dad's. I started on the early-warning radar at Sopley Hants. as an apprentice, moved on to repairing tv's, trained into colour, solid-state then specialized in projectors, the massive theatre-type ones in casinos etc. When I started my own company I diversified into PA systems and video walls. The crunch came for me when a Panasonic PT102 projector landed on my bench. I looked at the schematics and ordered some PSU parts. They arrived a couple of days later in a DL sized envelope taped to a bit of cardboard. I could barely see them, let alone the three or four smd solder legs! That's when I threw in the towel at 50 and went full-time back to college for 3 years. I did a computer networking and system administration course with 125 others. 12 of us passed, I was one of them more by luck than judgement.

As usual my timing was impeccable. I hit the job market just as the IT bubble burst. So back to college for a training qualification, then I ran the taxi school in Perth (a two week full time course for new drivers there) most students could barely speak broken English. I could tell a few tales about that and some hairy experiences with Somali students on their driving lessons......a bit like the lovely Jane...2 speeds....flat out and stop!

Started the trailer business then came back here to blighty - Christchurch taxi for a while then retired.
 

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Weird double post alert!!!

That's the problem in a nutshell @Barfly, the turkeys don't want to vote for thanksgiving, and while I'm not unsympathetic to the plight of people losing their jobs and business's having to downsize, that is the reality of the situation when technological change and progress happens - sometimes people whose lively-hood comes from servicing the old technology find themselves out of a job or having to retrain. Adapt, retrain and keep up, or fall by the wayside. It's the cycle of life in a technological world, and clinging to the past won't save you.

Once upon a time there was a great demand for phone operators to manually switch everyone's calls, then automatic phone exchanges came along and suddenly a lot of telephone operators were out of work or having to retrain. Should the progress of technology have been blocked or stifled so that the phone operators could keep their jobs ? Would we want to go back to a manual phone system today ? Could we even if we wanted to ?

From about the 1960's to around 2000 you had TV technicians beavering away repairing and maintaining CRT based televisions - initially based on valves, then discrete semiconductors, then integrated circuits, but as long as a CRT remained in the design they were somewhat repairable and maintainable (and in need of repairs) so there was a thriving job market for those who repaired them. LCD panels and continuous shrinking and integration of circuitry pretty much killed that as LCD TV's became more and more integrated and less and less repairable beginning in the mid 2000's.

Today a TV is a huge LCD screen on a frame that is 80% of the cost of the entire TV and there are two very small PCB's about the size of paperback books screwed to the back of the screen - one a power supply and the other a signal board which is totally surface mount integrated circuits with essentially no repairable components on them and no circuit diagrams available even if you wanted to try. Repairing a modern LCD TV is essentially down to board swapping or swapping a cracked screen and that's about it. No real troubleshooting skills required and nothing you can really do apart from swap a board etc.

Pretty much over night the whole "local" TV repair service industry collapsed as technology moved on and things have become largely uneconomic or feasible to repair aside from module swapping. My Dad repaired TV's (among many other kinds of electronics) for many years but thankfully retired before the end of the CRT era. I learnt how to repair CRT TV's from him as a hobby when I was young - back in the days where you could pick up an older faulty TV for a steal, repair it yourself and have a good working TV. I even used to component level repair CRT monitors 20 years ago when I worked in a computer repair shop and I was the only one on staff who could - everyone else there just did computer repairs and didn't have a clue about monitors. Today those skills I learnt specific to CRT TV's and monitors are completely useless for modern LCD TV's and monitors. Time has moved on and I've moved on to different things.

It truly is adapt or die and fortunately for car dealers while EV's are a lot less maintenance needy compared to ICE vehicles, the transition is not quite as abrupt as going from old CRT TV's to todays modern zero maintenance and just swap a board TV's - there is still quite a lot of stuff in an EV that can genuinely be repaired and maintained like brakes, suspension, steering, heater/aircon, back up cameras etc etc... EV's remove only the combustion engine drive train, not the rest of the car. But they will need to downsize and retrain.
My situation is almost identical to your dad's. I started on the early-warning radar at Sopley Hants. as an apprentice, moved on to repairing tv's, trained into colour, solid-state then specialized in projectors, the massive theatre-type ones in casinos etc. When I started my own company I diversified into PA systems and video walls. The crunch came for me when a Panasonic PT102 projector landed on my bench. I looked at the schematics and ordered some PSU parts. They arrived a couple of days later in a DL sized envelope taped to a bit of cardboard. I could barely see them, let alone the three or four smd solder legs! That's when I threw in the towel at 50 and went full-time back to college for 3 years. I did a computer networking and system administration course with 125 others. 12 of us passed, I was one of them more by luck than judgement.

As usual my timing was impeccable. I hit the job market just as the IT bubble burst. So back to college for a training qualification, then I ran the taxi school in Perth (a two week full time course for new drivers there) most students could barely speak broken English. I could tell a few tales about that and some hairy experiences with Somali students on their driving lessons......a bit like the lovely Jane...2 speeds....flat out and stop!

Started the trailer business then came back here to blighty - Christchurch taxi for a while then retired.
 
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