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What's interesting about this 'dead 12v' thread is that once again the drain happened immediately after a boot open and close event. An outside observer would be forced to link these two things together. But perhaps this is just a 'last straw' event as well, and the 12v has been run down to quite low levels over a period of time before this killed it.

For some years I have used a smart charger at least once per month and left it connected overnight usually even if it doesn't seem to need it. As that is also a conditioner as well as a smart charger I have so far escaped any such 12v DC sudden death. But then again I will never know if that charge regime was anything to do with that result.

The subject of boosters is also interesting. Most that are sold have been designed to crank an ICE engine which needs a fair amount of power. But a BEV just needs an adequate supply of 12v to engage the contactors and connect the traction battery to the car. Some of those tiny devices have a kind of charge accumulator inside that then releases a high powered boost for a second or so.

That is not needed for a BEV. And whilst they will work they operate in a different way and really need two people. One to activate the boost and one inside the car to press 'start' when the brief charge is released. A BEV just needs a fully charged 12v battery such as in a traditional jump start or from a small emergency 12v unit carried in the glove box or boot.
 

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LEAF N-TEC 62KW
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What's interesting about this 'dead 12v' thread is that once again the drain happened immediately after a boot open and close event. An outside observer would be forced to link these two things together. But perhaps this is just a 'last straw' event as well, and the 12v has been run down to quite low levels over a period of time before this killed it.

For some years I have used a smart charger at least once per month and left it connected overnight usually even if it doesn't seem to need it. As that is also a conditioner as well as a smart charger I have so far escaped any such 12v DC sudden death. But then again I will never know if that charge regime was anything to do with that result.

The subject of boosters is also interesting. Most that are sold have been designed to crank an ICE engine which needs a fair amount of power. But a BEV just needs an adequate supply of 12v to engage the contactors and connect the traction battery to the car. Some of those tiny devices have a kind of charge accumulator inside that then releases a high powered boost for a second or so.

That is not needed for a BEV. And whilst they will work they operate in a different way and really need two people. One to activate the boost and one inside the car to press 'start' when the brief charge is released. A BEV just needs a fully charged 12v battery such as in a traditional jump start or from a small emergency 12v unit carried in the glove box or boot.
Regardless of the cause, it shouldn't be happening to any EV, let alone a nearly new one. Hyundai needs to find the problem and fix it for once and for all.
 

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What's interesting about this 'dead 12v' thread is that once again the drain happened immediately after a boot open and close event. An outside observer would be forced to link these two things together. But perhaps this is just a 'last straw' event as well, and the 12v has been run down to quite low levels over a period of time before this killed it.

For some years I have used a smart charger at least once per month and left it connected overnight usually even if it doesn't seem to need it. As that is also a conditioner as well as a smart charger I have so far escaped any such 12v DC sudden death. But then again I will never know if that charge regime was anything to do with that result.

The subject of boosters is also interesting. Most that are sold have been designed to crank an ICE engine which needs a fair amount of power. But a BEV just needs an adequate supply of 12v to engage the contactors and connect the traction battery to the car. Some of those tiny devices have a kind of charge accumulator inside that then releases a high powered boost for a second or so.

That is not needed for a BEV. And whilst they will work they operate in a different way and really need two people. One to activate the boost and one inside the car to press 'start' when the brief charge is released. A BEV just needs a fully charged 12v battery such as in a traditional jump start or from a small emergency 12v unit carried in the glove box or boot.
Indeed, to an outside observer it would seem easy to link the boot open/close scenario. What has thrown me is the exact same battery drain occurred in the early hours of the morning without anyone having been near or touched the car since the previous evening, only that time the car did its job and recovered the battery. I was blissfully unaware of this 'event' until I went through the charging histogram.
 

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Regardless of the cause, it shouldn't be happening to any EV, let alone a nearly new one. Hyundai needs to find the problem and fix it for once and for all.
I agree, its not the 1960s or 70s.car ownership. There must be thousands upon thousands of people who don't have a private drive in which to plug in to desulphate or top up a 12v battery, I don't see the streets clogged with broken down BEVs because they haven't topped up the 12v battery every month, and there's probably thousands of owners wouldn't have a clue how.
When I bought my first car, the handbook told me how to check the fluids and battery level etc.
Now in the 21st century the handbook warns me not to drink the battery fluid!!
Which tells me a lot about the level of intelligence manufacturers are dealing with. Lol
 

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Kia Soul EV
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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
UPDATE on this issue:

After 7 hours RAC guy came. Their reason was -> Because I was at home, I was keep getting pushed to the end of the queue as there were more urgent cases coming up. - If they have told me it will take 7 hours at first, I could have walked to a shop to buy a battery charger... But I guess they don't know the urgent cases before, so fair enough! I don't want to get into details in this post as the main focus is the 12V battery, not RAC response time.

The guy checked the battery with a voltmeter(or whatever the name of that device is :) ) and read '0'. Yes zero. He said he is suprised as well that he wouldn't expect from a new car/battery to completely get drained. He connected a battery charger and we could turn the car on. It was that quick!. Then I plugged the car to 3-pin socket and we checked that 12 V battery was being charged. (Also before plugging, I tried utility mode just to see. It was charging the 12 V battery as well). So I left the car plugged in to get the battery fully charged.

I asked him if I can use that lithum battery chargers to 'jump start' the car. He said as the 12V battery is fully discharged, that small chargers couldn't supply the initial voltage to start the car. (like Hitstirrer mentioned)

A BEV just needs a fully charged 12v battery such as in a traditional jump start or from a small emergency 12v unit carried in the glove box or boot.
He was using this kind of thing and said I should use something like that for a fully drained battery:

Office supplies Rectangle Font Electric blue Electronic device


Another point - maybe quite irrelevant - is that I previously set the light around the gear selector to blue. After we 'resurrected' the car, it turned to red. Probably the default is red and it turned to default settings. I can't remember what was it when I first got the car. Nothing else in settings changed...

Another thing I wonder is, if I have plugged the car at first, would the car accept the charge and even charge the 12V battery?
I thought about it but the funny thing is doors were unlocked but the boot was locked. So I couldn't reach the cables. (I know there is a button to open the boot manually from inside and I could fold the back seats to access the cables... but to be honest, at that time I wasn't thinking that plugging in would charge the 12V battery. After everything is sorted, I could think of it, hey ho :) )

Lastly, I got a BM2 unit connected and for the past two days there is no issue...
 

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Glad that you got it sorted.
Another thing I wonder is, if I have plugged the car at first, would the car accept the charge and even charge the 12V battery?
Probably not. Certainly it doesn't on the LEAF as you need to activate the main contactors on the HV battery to connect the DC : DC convertor, and hence you don't get the 12v charging without sufficient in the 12v battery to operate the contactors.
 

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LEAF N-TEC 62KW
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Looking like Korean EV owners should be keeping one of the Lead acid power bank jump starters in their vehicles until the manufacturers have investigated and fixed this issue.
 

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Kia Soul EV
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Discussion Starter · #29 · (Edited)
Looking like Korean EV owners should be keeping one of the Lead acid power bank jump starters in their vehicles until the manufacturers have investigated and fixed this issue.
Don't directly blame the Koreans. At the second I knew that 12V battery was the issue when nothing is working in the car, because I was experienced with this issue. It happened to me before with my good old Leaf :)
 

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Looking like Korean EV owners should be keeping one of the Lead acid power bank jump starters in their vehicles until the manufacturers have investigated and fixed this issue.
It used to be that many Ford Ice cars would not start on Monday mornings due to flat batteries when the weather turned cool. So it's not just a Korean issue.
 

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Isolated incidents like this have been reported for the seven years that I have driven EVs. The world is now divided into three kinds of EV owners. One very large group who have never experienced this problem and are unaware of its existence. Another much smaller group who have been affected and then spend much time and energy (correctly) stating that it is a disgrace and that 'something must be done' but take no further action themselves. Then there is a much smaller group who have suffered from this syndrome, and complained that it was a disgrace, but took precautions to either prevent it from happening again, or took steps to be able to recover the situation themselves by carrying around an emergency supply of volts.

We all agree that it is a disgraceful situation that should/must be addressed by all OEMs, and probably has been sorted by now. But that will never overcome the normal events where lights are left on when parked and/or a door/boot sensor fails to engage properly and the 12v DC battery is drained.

Personally I just put the car 12v battery on a smart charger during my monthly tyre kicking and screenwash bottle filling routine to make sure that it is always charged and its condition checked. And also now carry around a small 12v battery with clip leads. As well as a 10mm spanner to disconnect the car's 12v battery when needed. The small battery is kept charged by a solar panel on the passenger side dash.

We all know that this should not be necessary. But you know what, I prefer to do that than bay at the moon about why it should not be necessary.
 

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If you're not an idiot and can read the instructions, unlike some of the people writing reviews, why not avoid carrying yet more LiIon around and finding it flat when you need it, with a capacitor-based jump starter:

Isolated incidents like this have been reported for the seven years that I have driven EVs. The world is now divided into three kinds of EV owners. One very large group who have never experienced this problem and are unaware of its existence. Another much smaller group who have been affected and then spend much time and energy (correctly) stating that it is a disgrace and that 'something must be done' but take no further action themselves. Then there is a much smaller group who have suffered from this syndrome, and complained that it was a disgrace, but took precautions to either prevent it from happening again, or took steps to be able to recover the situation themselves by carrying around an emergency supply of volts.

We all agree that it is a disgraceful situation that should/must be addressed by all OEMs, and probably has been sorted by now. But that will never overcome the normal events where lights are left on when parked and/or a door/boot sensor fails to engage properly and the 12v DC battery is drained.

Personally I just put the car 12v battery on a smart charger during my monthly tyre kicking and screenwash bottle filling routine to make sure that it is always charged and its condition checked. And also now carry around a small 12v battery with clip leads. As well as a 10mm spanner to disconnect the car's 12v battery when needed. The small battery is kept charged by a solar panel on the passenger side dash.

We all know that this should not be necessary. But you know what, I prefer to do that than bay at the moon about why it should not be necessary.
There's the other group like myself who post these things in order to let others who might be less savvy know what can happen and how to potentially avoid the pitfall of becoming stuck.
 

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There's the other group like myself who post these things in order to let others who might be less savvy know what can happen and how to potentially avoid the pitfall of becoming stuck.
Well yes. But that means there is another group of people who never join a forum in order to read your entry. And another group who do join a forum but never use the handy dandy search facility to discover a couple of dozen identical threads going back many years. Not that another such thread is unwelcome of course because the ultimate aim is to get this issue sorted properly by OEMs taking notice. And, as you say, alerting the unsuspecting so that they can decide whether to join the complainers, or the action takers, or both.
 

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Well yes. But that means there is another group of people who never join a forum in order to read your entry. And another group who do join a forum but never use the handy dandy search facility to discover a couple of dozen identical threads going back many years. Not that another such thread is unwelcome of course because the ultimate aim is to get this issue sorted properly by OEMs taking notice. And, as you say, alerting the unsuspecting so that they can decide whether to join the complainers, or the action takers, or both.
Sooo many groups, so little time. I put the information/advice/experience out there, if someone finds it helpful in whatever capacity they use the info, whether it's to ease their worry that it's only a flat battery and nothing more drastic, or to be able to use my and others experience to take things up with their dealer or if they feel confident to become self reliant and buy a battery charger/starter/booster as a form of insurance against becoming stranded then I've helped. I'm not interested in dissing any particular manufacturer as they all have faults, some similar, some totally different. If I can help someone, I will, I may only pass this way once in my lifetime, so any help I can to give to anyone, I will.
 
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