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Discussion Starter #1
Hi!

I'm John with a new Outlander PHEV after years driving the Type 2 and the Type 3 Prius.

I'd be interested to know why Tesla can get a range of around 300 miles but other BEVs don't even come close.

My first impressions are that the whole charging thing is incredibly complicated but the beauty of electric traction makes up for it.
 

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As Paul says the Model S has a battery that's nearly 4 times larger than the BMW i3!

As EV sales increase, with batteries being built on a large scale manufacturing like Tesla has plans with the gigafactory. The costs of these large capacity batteries will drop considerably. Maybe in 5 years you could buy a 300 mile BEV for the same amount you paid for your outlander PHEV :)

Keep us updated how your finding your outlander! Don't be scared of the plug! ;-)
 
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Tesla do promise next model will be smaller affordable mass market car with similar range. But I just might have to get a model S in the meantime :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the info. If the i3 had the Tesla range it would probably be parked outside!
 

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Indeed, many folk are hoping the Tesla Model 3 will finally get the range folk want in a package more can afford. It feels we may be six, maybe eight or even ten years away from truly affordable long-range EVs to me, be that used versions of future cars or prices coming down enough in newer cars.
 

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If you've seen a Model S, you know how big it is. Otherwise, think BMW 7 series, but larger.

The bottom of the car is almost entirely battery.
I saw elsewhere that it's almost identical in length and width to the new Range Rover (I haven't checked the validity of that). Given that there seem to be plenty of those around, is it really the behemouth that so many imply?
 

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I agree that the discussion is getting boring and I don't think anyone is saying that it's so big that it's unsuitable for UK roads but just that cars that size put some people off from purchasing just because of simple practicalities (like having to do a 3 point turn out of your drive), but clearly not everyone. Lots of people like big cars for prestige, road presence, etc.

It'd be interesting to know what percentage of cars on UK roads are larger (I suspect the answer is a very small number) but not sure how to figure that one out.
 

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It's about 1/2 the height of a RR, so doesn't seem as huge...

Tesla's battery pack uses a different approach to everyone else. They use thousands of small cells that are like supersized AA batteries, in an actively temperature-managed armored enclosure installed in the floor of the car. Other manufacturers generally use flat cells packed tightly together and hidden somewhere in the car.
 

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The 'skateboard' design with batteries in the floor is becoming common.

Only Tesla engineered cars use an AA sized cylindrical cells. Most other EVs build their packs from larger prismatic cells.

Tesla aren't the only ones to cool the battery. The i3, Renault Fluence and the new Nissan eNV200 van all have some form of active pack cooling. Maybe some of the others too.


i3 has an optional pack heater that uses the car's heat pump.

Leaf has a small resistance heater just to keep the pack from freezing. (well some of the earliest ones don't)
 
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