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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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Or read here.


In head-to-head test between the manufacturers standard and eco tyres the performance in key safety tests, like stopping distance and aquaplaning, the results showed that eco tyres are significantly worse than their non-eco branded tyres.

The upside? A 3.1% improvement in energy efficiency on the road.

I'll stick to my non-eco tyres thank you (as I largely fit all-seasons anyway)
 

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I like MICHELIN CrossClimate... they are a good quality with excellent performance in winter and summer. There may be other brand/models but the CCs have never disappointed me. Not cheap though.
 

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I'm on my second EV and wouldn't use Eco tyres. Both came with them and were soon removed! Very poor cold/wet grip. Not worth a few miles of extra range.

The factory fit Dunlop Ensave that come with the Leaf are downright scary in cold/wet conditions even with plenty of tread depth.
 

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Not surprised at all. The Nexens I had on the Kia were shocking. I usually get decent tyres that are either all weather or summer with A grade Wet performance. Being able to stop safely is more important than a few p saved on electric.
I am looking forward to 4 new Goodyear EfficientGrips to go on my Kia in a couple of weeks. The Nexen's are rubbish
 

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I am looking forward to 4 new Goodyear EfficientGrips to go on my Kia in a couple of weeks. The Nexen's are rubbish
These were fitted as OEM on the ID.3 I owned briefly. Driving on cold wet roads around 10C they felt very grippy & secure, have to say I was most impressed with them. Bearing in mind they come with about 2mm more tread than the e.Primacy tyres, and had a very long miles-until-worn-out range on another tyre test review compared to just about every other decent tyre out there, I'd say they're an excellent choice.
 

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Of course with the wider tyres we all have these days, and all the electronic stuff, even the crappiest ditch finder or EV tyre is going to outperform a sports car on performance tyres from 15-20 years ago.

It’s all relative. As long as you’re not cornering on two wheels you’ll be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Of course with the wider tyres we all have these days, and all the electronic stuff, even the crappiest ditch finder or EV tyre is going to outperform a sports car on performance tyres from 15-20 years ago.

It’s all relative. As long as you’re not cornering on two wheels you’ll be fine.
Didn't read the link for braking distance then...
 

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Of course with the wider tyres we all have these days, and all the electronic stuff, even the crappiest ditch finder or EV tyre is going to outperform a sports car on performance tyres from 15-20 years ago.

It’s all relative. As long as you’re not cornering on two wheels you’ll be fine.
You have missed the point entirely. What tyres were like 20 years ago, or "not cornering on two wheel" is utterly irrelevant to the point that EV low rolling resistance tyres increase wet stopping distances and reduce grip dramatically. All so you can add maybe 5 or 10 miles to your EV range.
 

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Didn't read the link for braking distance then...
Indeed. I'm genuinely shocked that wet stopping distance was one to two car lengths worse on the EV low rolling resistence tyres.

The irony is I have always felt that saving a few hundred quid was not worth the extra risk to my family, myself and other road users. Damned if gaining 10 miles of range at 100% SoC is going to save more than a few pennies per charge.
 

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And how do those compare to stopping distances 20 years ago? Just because something isn’t the best in class doesn’t mean it’s terrible. If we insisted on top tier all round we’d all be driving Ferraris, right?
 
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Skip to 10 minute mark


Or read here.


In head-to-head test between the manufacturers standard and eco tyres the performance in key safety tests, like stopping distance and aquaplaning, the results showed that eco tyres are significantly worse than their non-eco branded tyres.

The upside? A 3.1% improvement in energy efficiency on the road.

I'll stick to my non-eco tyres thank you (as I largely fit all-seasons anyway)
I agree, had eco Bridgestone on the ateca I had. Terrible tyres for grip even off the line, bought some cheap generic tyres for it and it improved performance off th. Line and braking. Got Michelins on my my current car, they give a better ride quality and grip
 

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Of course with the wider tyres we all have these days, and all the electronic stuff, even the crappiest ditch finder or EV tyre is going to outperform a sports car on performance tyres from 15-20 years ago.

It’s all relative. As long as you’re not cornering on two wheels you’ll be fine.
It's for the emergency stops or emergency avoiding action that you need as much grip as you can get. These situations can happen to anyone not just the boy racers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
And how do those compare to stopping distances 20 years ago? Just because something isn’t the best in class doesn’t mean it’s terrible. If we insisted on top tier all round we’d all be driving Ferraris, right?
Oooh whataboutism!

There's a significant difference to paying more for an eco/EV tyre than there is to buying a car with great performance.

Autobild 2007
Dry Braking
Measured in metres stopping distance
1) Kumho (34.3 m)
2) Toyo (34.5 m)
3) Pirelli (35.4 m)
4) Yokohama (35.7 m)
5) Michelin (36.6 m)


2022 AutoBild 19 Inch Summer UHP Tyre Test

With the Michelin Pilot Sport stopping in just less than 35m.

Plenty of variables.
 

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I don't think there is any dispute that tyres 20 years ago were worse than modern tyres (especially in wet). But that is a strawman argument, because that was not the point of the article. The point is that as of right now in 2022, low rolling resistance EV tyres give significantly decreased performance for a few % better efficiency.

Each to their own of course, but saving pennies for each 100% charge, or making sure my family and me have that little bit more safety? Well it's a no brainer IMHO.
 

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Of course with the wider tyres we all have these days, and all the electronic stuff, even the crappiest ditch finder or EV tyre is going to outperform a sports car on performance tyres from 15-20 years ago.

It’s all relative. As long as you’re not cornering on two wheels you’ll be fine.
Exactly, like any sensible driver I try not to drive at the limits of the tyres. The margin of difference between the best and worst of the tyres in that autobild report is pretty small anyway (in fact you could argue the dry times are within the margin of measurement error and it's hard to be fully scientific with such tests (Eg road surface differences, brake /tyre temp differences).
I can't honestly remember a time in 30 years of driving when I've had to do a full on emergency stop and needed absolutely every last ounce of grip, in any weather.
I cycle a lot, skinny tyres on the road bike and fat ones on the mountain bike. I wouldn't put the mountain bike tyres on the the road bike because they're "safer". I came off my road bike at a fair speed a few years back on a damp/greasy bend, I didn't once think I should get better tyres (or put the mountain bike tyres on), my only thought was I should have slowed down. I doubt wider / better tyres would have made a jot of difference anyway.
It's about using the right tools for the job and riding/driving accordingly and above all paying attention.
Having grippier tyres can also conversely make the consequences of a loss of grip event far more serious due to the higher speeds involved and human risk compensation psychology.
After all, how many famous celebrities have died driving a supercar compared with those driving a Fiesta?!
The supercar obviously has the superior
tyres and handling.
 
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