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BMW stopped offering the REx in the EU because the engine failed EURO6 on NoX levels with the new WLTP testing. It was too expensive to redesign and would take too long.
Surely thats a strong argument against Rex if simply improving/replacing an engine is all thats needed rather than building a whole new car which most be orders of magnitude more expensive and complex?
That does not mean the principle of the REx is dead while the cost of the REx is less than the equivalent battery size increase and public charging remains hit and miss for success and highly variable on extra time for a longer journey. Even at parity of cost the flexibility of dual fuel has a significant value for the user.
But not for the manufacturer it seems.
I have not had to use the REx in anger in the year of ownership but it does mean I do not have to trust in only the public charge network to get home without being recovered on a truck. That confidence lets me use the full battery and not have to reserve some of the battery capacity for a plan B or low efficiency on a cold windy day. That means I can run one car since with the REx I can tackle any journey in the UK.
Or, conversely next years i3 with 50%-100% more battery than your current i3 might mean you dont need a Rex either?

I think there are issues with Rex that will (have?) kill it at birth even though yep, it has all the advantages you and others outline.
  • Consider from a manufacturers POV not a consumer. A new car has to pay back its development costs over the lifetime of that car. So, if you are looking say five and definitely ten years out, when its almost certain that BEV by then will be ample (range. cost, size) for all cars, how long will this new model with a new engine be saleable as mass market car and not just to a few who require to be able to drive to John OGroats at the drop of a hat? Maybe five years? Thats probably not a profitable car then. Better to do what Kia and Hyundai do, produce ICE and BEV variants let the public choose and amortise the costs over all models. After all, as you pointed out, BMW found it wasnt viable simply to change the engine on an existing Rex even though they had everything else already in place so you cant get much cheaper than that. How then can developing a whole new car be profitable?
  • Second, a BEV, by comparison to a Rex, is a simple concept for a saleperson to explain, its not an electric car plus a load of ICE gubbins that need maintenance. The Rex, whilst we in the "SpeakEV bubble" may be well aware of the benefits, is a different beast to the non EV aware. After all, the Ampera/Volt was not such a massive success, yet why not when it should have been according to the Rex benefits, especially since a minor tweak to up the battery size would have made it even more capable and I'd almost certainly be in one now as would I am sure many here. But maybe not the general public who it seems from the evidence of Volt/Ampera sales, "dont get it" ?
  • Third, emissions regulations may make it problematic to drive Rex's in city centres (is this an issue now with the i3 in London?) making it much less attractive as a single go everywhere car.
  • Finally, lets say the manufacturers, Mazda (and anyone else or is it just Mazda?) do bring out Rex's in 2-5 years time? At that point Rex's will be very vulnerable to the Osborne effect in two respects, a simpler fully capable EV will be available by then or soon 250 mile range EVs will be common from mid next year let alone 2022, 2023, plus as said the "one more year" school of running the old ICE will prevail for many. So, building a Rex is quite a risky economic proposition for a manufacturer because they will either be obsolete at release, or perceived as being so shortly and thus will never make a profit. And if they dont build them, then whatever the economic and flexibilty benefits are to consumers, it wont happen.
IMO the auto industry missed the boat ten years ago, that was the time to be designing and then producing Rex's. But they didnt apart from GM who flubbed up. And the one major vendor who did have one decided it wasn't profitable to continue.
Maybe there will be room for one or two manufacturers , and perhaps Mazda with its niche appeal might be one of those. Five years back I'd have bought a Rex. Now? No, not when a 250 mile range car is here. Five years time when 300+ mile ranges at more affordable levels and fast chargers are commonplace? Not a chance. And if manufacturers beleive thats what most consumers will be thinking, then why make one? Toyota has pulled the wool over peoples eyes with their "self charging" nonsense, seems its easier for manufacturers to spend their development R&D on marketing than building a new car so I expect we'll see a few more jumping on that bandwagon rather than producing a Rex. Much easier to make a video or an advert than a car. A much shorter development cycle and if it doesnt work knock out a different ad next month.

Farewell Rex, we knew you, err, not very well.
 

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Ecohound
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I think Tesla are excluded from the smmt model top 10 lists as they don’t allow reporting numbers for the UK, they are however included in the overall totals for BEV, and make up the large majority of the ‘other imports’ category, my guess is they did between 1500 - 2000 vehicles in Nov in the UK
Tesla are featured in SMMT figures and when they have appeared in the top 10 they are under other manufacturer as they can't bring themselves to say Tesla. If you want a good world wide idea of EV sales check out inside EV's or EVsales-blogspot. At the moment Europe is being starved of Model 3 due to Tesla prioritising the Netherlands due to incentive changes.
 

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Interesting analysis by AnotherJoe, thx.
Everything you say makes sense. But I don't think you can write off Rexes just yet. Volt/Ampera has probably been discontinued as being too complicated mechanically to be able to be made at low enough cost. It's not got the clutch+DSG complexity, but there's still a lot of gear cutting & accurate, complex machining needed to make the epicyclic gearbox.

Despite the age of the Volt Mk1, it's still a brilliant duel-fuel car, mine has meant my petrol consumption has been halved over the 4 years I've had mine, and the fact that there's no range anxiety means that the lack of pure EV range (45 miles) isn't the problem it is compared to Mk1 Leaf; the Leaf was great back in 2010, but is now seriously under-ranged; not so any Rex. So any Rex will always have the ability to do decently long trips - especially given a half-decent Ice - the i3 Rex is probably slightly below the minimum power you'ld want at 37 hp. Any battery degradation such as Leafs have seen is of no concern in a Rex. Unfortunate, but not a journey-preventer in any way.

Mazda MX30 Rex will be a lot simpler than the Ampera's epicyclic setup, so much cheaper to make. Also the 35 kWh battery in it should be lighter per kWh than the Volt's 2012 tech. The Rex will be a lightweight rotary, so I'm expecting the car to weigh either the same or less than Volt Mk1 (1750 kg appx). Wankel engines aren't the most efficient, due to very large surface area per unit of combustion volume means there's a larger loss of heat than in a conventional cylinder, but again the total usage of the Rex in this car will be far less than my Amp, so I'm not going to be worried if the pure-petrol mpgs are as low as 35 mpg - I get 45 on Amp.

35 kWh will be seriously under-ranged in a few years time, but that 150 mile Ev range will be good enough to reduce my total 12k miles p.a. petrol consumption to maybe 1/10 of what it was pre-Amp 4 years ago, and that's a huge improvement on where I am now (1/2). My longest regular trip is 160 miles, plus the occasional holiday of anything at all, may be 200+ miles with no charging at the destination. Unless there's a dramatic breakthrough in battery mass/kWh (solid state?), then Evs with the 60+ kWh batteries are going to remain heavy animals, with all the associated tyre costs. Owners of these cars will be lugging around the extra 25+ kWh worth of battery most of the time, and if Elon's 1,000,000 mile/battery tech is adopted widely, the extra degradation suffered by 35 kWh batteries in comparison won't be an issue. Bottom line - if the extra cost of sticking an Ice in the car is less than that of the extra 30 or more kWh of battery, then you've got an equally capable Ev for less money, and all the advantages of duel-fuel for peace of mind, as well as faster refuelling on those super-long trips than anything bar a 350 kW Ultra-rapid.

Also, consider that these Evs will be sold world-wide. Even today it's hard, I hear, to drive a Tesla from Sydney or Melbourne to Alice Springs, due to the large distance between these places with little charging infrastructure around. The same must be true in lots of Africa, India, maybe China outside the cities. So there's going to be a worldwide market for Rexes for a long while yet, I believe. I can't see the entire planet surface having 50 kW Rapids (2 per site at least) within 100 miles of each other for a very long time yet.
 

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Despite the age of the Volt Mk1, it's still a brilliant duel-fuel car, mine has meant my petrol consumption has been halved over the 4 years I've had mine, and the fact that there's no range anxiety means that the lack of pure EV range (45 miles) isn't the problem it is compared to Mk1 Leaf; the Leaf was great back in 2010, but is now seriously under-ranged; not so any Rex. So any Rex will always have the ability to do decently long trips - especially given a half-decent Ice - the i3 Rex is probably slightly below the minimum power you'ld want at 37 hp. Any battery degradation such as Leafs have seen is of no concern in a Rex. Unfortunate, but not a journey-preventer in any way.
^This. We sold our 2011 Leaf earlier this year and replaced it with another Volt. They do pretty much the same EV range, as you don't want to run out of charge in the Leaf and be stranded, so can't run it too low. With the engine as backup you can use the whole Volt battery without any concern. Plus there is no visible battery degradation in the Volt, as it's hidden by the top and bottom buffers, plus it's thermally managed. Pretty good for a design from 2007!
 

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Or, conversely next years i3 with 50%-100% more battery than your current i3 might mean you dont need a Rex either?

I think there are issues with Rex that will (have?) kill it at birth even though yep, it has all the advantages you and others outline.
  • Consider from a manufacturers POV not a consumer. A new car has to pay back its development costs over the lifetime of that car. So, if you are looking say five and definitely ten years out, when its almost certain that BEV by then will be ample (range. cost, size) for all cars, how long will this new model with a new engine be saleable as mass market car and not just to a few who require to be able to drive to John OGroats at the drop of a hat? Maybe five years? Thats probably not a profitable car then. Better to do what Kia and Hyundai do, produce ICE and BEV variants let the public choose and amortise the costs over all models. After all, as you pointed out, BMW found it wasnt viable simply to change the engine on an existing Rex even though they had everything else already in place so you cant get much cheaper than that. How then can developing a whole new car be profitable?
  • Second, a BEV, by comparison to a Rex, is a simple concept for a saleperson to explain, its not an electric car plus a load of ICE gubbins that need maintenance. The Rex, whilst we in the "SpeakEV bubble" may be well aware of the benefits, is a different beast to the non EV aware. After all, the Ampera/Volt was not such a massive success, yet why not when it should have been according to the Rex benefits, especially since a minor tweak to up the battery size would have made it even more capable and I'd almost certainly be in one now as would I am sure many here. But maybe not the general public who it seems from the evidence of Volt/Ampera sales, "dont get it" ?
  • Third, emissions regulations may make it problematic to drive Rex's in city centres (is this an issue now with the i3 in London?) making it much less attractive as a single go everywhere car.
  • Finally, lets say the manufacturers, Mazda (and anyone else or is it just Mazda?) do bring out Rex's in 2-5 years time? At that point Rex's will be very vulnerable to the Osborne effect in two respects, a simpler fully capable EV will be available by then or soon 250 mile range EVs will be common from mid next year let alone 2022, 2023, plus as said the "one more year" school of running the old ICE will prevail for many. So, building a Rex is quite a risky economic proposition for a manufacturer because they will either be obsolete at release, or perceived as being so shortly and thus will never make a profit. And if they dont build them, then whatever the economic and flexibilty benefits are to consumers, it wont happen.
IMO the auto industry missed the boat ten years ago, that was the time to be designing and then producing Rex's. But they didnt apart from GM who flubbed up. And the one major vendor who did have one decided it wasn't profitable to continue.
Maybe there will be room for one or two manufacturers , and perhaps Mazda with its niche appeal might be one of those. Five years back I'd have bought a Rex. Now? No, not when a 250 mile range car is here. Five years time when 300+ mile ranges at more affordable levels and fast chargers are commonplace? Not a chance. And if manufacturers beleive thats what most consumers will be thinking, then why make one? Toyota has pulled the wool over peoples eyes with their "self charging" nonsense, seems its easier for manufacturers to spend their development R&D on marketing than building a new car so I expect we'll see a few more jumping on that bandwagon rather than producing a Rex. Much easier to make a video or an advert than a car. A much shorter development cycle and if it doesnt work knock out a different ad next month.

Farewell Rex, we knew you, err, not very well.
It works well for me, and has enabled me to cut down on fossil fuel usage, without having a charger at home.
 

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Those replies are all true and all irrelevant if manufacturers don't see a market for it for the reasons I put forward.
Which is where I suggest we currentiy are, with just one vendor out of dozens suggesting they may bring out a Rex. Strange really considering it's a simpler mechanical proposition than a PHEV where both ICE and electric motor drive the wheels, but that's where we are.
 

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Ecohound
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125751

Well Zap Map have come up trumps on UK sales figures but it's Tesla that we really have to thank & it comes as no surprise as they are already a common sight on our roads. With 5,300 sold in Q3 42% performance models standard range + a third of sales & long range 25%. All very interesting reading.
 

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I'm surprised how much impact the M3 has had on MS sales.
 

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Ecohound
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126205

Again diesel is down by a large margin with every other segment up and Tesla Model 3 is working wonders for sales. It is the 8th best selling car in December .
126206
 

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How soon will sales of the Model 3 overtake the BMW 3?

Will we hit 5% pure EV for this years total sales, and hence see charging networks come near to covering their running costs? Also hotels will start careing about the EV driver macket at that sort of level.
 

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Ecohound
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So total sales for the year 2019 were down 2.4% which is mainly due to private buyers. Diesel sales for the year are now only at 25% when not so long ago they were 50%, what does 2020 hold for them below 20% at least is my guess. Will petrol sales keep increasing or is the year that they peeked. BEV sales out stripped PHEV sales but only just and my guess is they both will double in 2020 which will still put them behind HEV sales. And frankly I'm not interested in MHEV figures as although they will be big it's only a marginal gain for fuel economy and air pollution. Certainly not real progress in electrifying transport.
The top ten cars have some interesting BEV & PHEV sales hidden in them. With no. 1 Golf 3 the Mini 5 the BMW 3 series all having electric vehicles in their models.
23 new BEV models and 10 PHEV models are expected to be launched this year according to SMMT.
 

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Encouraging. I find the way the % figures are quoted is quite confusing.

So, the December BEV 220% increase is well over 3 times. The YTD BEV 144% increase is well over double.
 

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Ecohound
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BEV sales up 203.9% taking 2.7% of the market, what a good start to the New Year. PHEV up 111.1% and 3.2% of the market but both are beaten by HEV sales which despite being only up by 20.6% have a market share of 6%. Talking of market share diesel is now below 20% & even petrol sales are down compared to last year. Mild Hybrid Petrol and diesel are up huge amounts mainly due to them really being the new kids on the block.

As for the overall market well it was down 7.3% which to me suggests that people are holding off for change and if you aren't changing your business model is going to kill you. But in saying that there are only 2 certain models that are electrified in the top ten. The Golf & 3 series with perhaps the Corsa as well but that is an outside chance.
 

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Ecohound
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Just looked at 2020 by brand
Audi is up along with BMW .
DS is up have they got their BEV on the market yet?
Hyundai and Kia are down.
MG is up & Nissan.
Renault down.
Toyota is down well with hybrids up it shows they have got competition.
Now the interesting one other imports only 396 so it wasn't Tesla dragging up the BEV sales.
 

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Ecohound
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January in Europe plugins
Portugal 11%
Spain 4.1%
France 8.2%
Italy 2.1%
Belgium 5.5%
Netherlands 7.6%
Denmark 7%
Sweden 31%
Norway 64%

Change is coming fast.
 

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Now the interesting one other imports only 396 so it wasn't Tesla dragging up the BEV sales.
Tesla has nothing to sell in the UK until the ships arrive in a few weeks time.

I expect many of the none Tesla EV sales are cars that were hold back from last year, as they are needed to reduce the CO2 fines this year. March's numbers could be VERY interesting.
 
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