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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

for info

19 plate etron 55

47k miles in rear motor started whirring/grinding

has had to have entire replacement rear motor but in replacing motor revealed it needed new ‘gearbox’ . Under warranty but I suspect a very expensive failure.
 

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Hi

for info

19 plate etron 55

47k miles in rear motor started whirring/grinding

has had to have entire replacement rear motor but in replacing motor revealed it needed new ‘gearbox’ . Under warranty but I suspect a very expensive failure.
Ask them how much if it wasn't under warranty.
 

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Ask them how much if it wasn't under warranty.
It’ll be the same fantasy made up number as when my old Audi A2 1.4 TDI got water ingress into the sub floor where the ECUs etc live.

Strip, fix the water ingress point, replace the ECU, dry sub floor, then road test.

Estimate, £3.6k…

Or my mates Audi A3 TDI with a failed turbo actuator (turbo itself fine), ‘can’t replace the actuator as a sub assembly and they only come with a new turbo unit’, £2.5k before labour and VAT. Fixed for £100 by me after sourcing a new actuator from Poland on eBay.

All main dealers charge like a wounded rhino, why should EVs be exempt?
 

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Whatever the cost it shouldn’t fail after 47k miles arguably
No, of course not, and it will have been designed to have a far longer life than that, but sometimes long life components fail prematurely, for all sorts of reasons.

The main thing is it has been fixed without cost to yourself. 👍
 

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All main dealers charge like a wounded rhino, why should EVs be exempt?
Indeed - mate's mechatronic controller in his wife's Merc ML failed and Merc wanted £2.5k to replace.

He posted the unit to a company in England who stripped it, fixed the circuitry, and sent it back.

All in about £350. Five years later still going strong - apparently if fixed properly they are better than new as they came off the production line with rubbish soldering.
 

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No, of course not, and it will have been designed to have a far longer life than that, but sometimes long life components fail prematurely, for all sorts of reasons.

The main thing is it has been fixed without cost to yourself. 👍
A lack of an early oil change is the usual thing.

'Sealed for life', yup, all that manufacturing shit is sealed in there for life. Just pray you don't have one of the few examples that have such debris in it to start with.
 

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Whatever the cost it shouldn’t fail after 47k miles arguably
Nope, definitely not.

True. Fascinated to know what has gone wrong - but the parts are being shipped back to Ingolstadt for analysis so will probably never know.
At least they are on their way. Renault would still be trying to swap something over to make the problem go away.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
A lack of an early oil change is the usual thing.

'Sealed for life', yup, all that manufacturing shit is sealed in there for life. Just pray you don't have one of the few examples that have such debris in it to start with.
Hopefully it will be good as new. It’s had many other small issues. Leaky sunroof, failed wing mirror camera , cruise control broken
 

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Or my mates Audi A3 TDI with a failed turbo actuator (turbo itself fine), ‘can’t replace the actuator as a sub assembly and they only come with a new turbo unit’, £2.5k before labour and VAT. Fixed for £100 by me after sourcing a new actuator from Poland on eBay.
Got a similar problem with my A4 Allroad. Audi parts quoted £1k for new turbo as the actuator doesn’t show as separate part. Can source one new from Autodoc for £220.

My wife used to have an A2 1.4 TDI. There were scare versions of 1.2 TDIs that did 80-90 mpg.
 

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I'm not crazy, the attack has begun.
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Or my mates Audi A3 TDI with a failed turbo actuator (turbo itself fine), ‘can’t replace the actuator as a sub assembly and they only come with a new turbo unit’, £2.5k before labour and VAT. Fixed for £100 by me after sourcing a new actuator from Poland on eBay.

All main dealers charge like a wounded rhino, why should EVs be exempt?
Got a similar problem with my A4 Allroad. Audi parts quoted £1k for new turbo as the actuator doesn’t show as separate part. Can source one new from Autodoc for £220.
So, if I might just clarify the thread of the conversation, if out of warranty the OP's £20k problem could be fixed for £100 from some parts of ebay.

Cool!!

:unsure:

..... pull the other one!
 

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So, if I might just clarify the thread of the conversation, if out of warranty the OP's £20k problem could be fixed for £100 from some parts of ebay.

Cool!!

:unsure:

..... pull the other one!
Well, not sure how you arrived at that particular conclusion, it was more a point that franchised dealers are not only restricted in what parts they will supply (preferring to sell you an assembly) but they all charge rather grandly for it.

I think most people will have understood that, even you, what you posted is just an illogical leap.
 

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Well, not sure how you arrived at that particular conclusion, it was more a point that franchised dealers are not only restricted in what parts they will supply (preferring to sell you an assembly) but they all charge rather grandly for it.

I think most people will have understood that, even you, what you posted is just an illogical leap.
It was tongue in cheek, but I do think we have to face up to the fact that with BEVs, we are far less likely to be able to fix them up with some 'sub-part' that we cobble together for a few quid. BEVs are going to cost more to maintain, whatever one argues about the number of moving parts and other irrelevant observations like that.
 

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It was tongue in cheek, but I do think we have to face up to the fact that with BEVs, we are far less likely to be able to fix them up with some 'sub-part' that we cobble together for a few quid. BEVs are going to cost more to maintain, whatever one argues about the number of moving parts and other irrelevant observations like that.
In time, spares will be available on ebay and from breakers. Just needs more EV drivers to crash. (non fatally)
 

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It was tongue in cheek, but I do think we have to face up to the fact that with BEVs, we are far less likely to be able to fix them up with some 'sub-part' that we cobble together for a few quid. BEVs are going to cost more to maintain, whatever one argues about the number of moving parts and other irrelevant observations like that.
Well, yes, but to be clear I wasn’t cobbling together any parts, it was a part that for some reason Audi wouldn’t sell independent of the turbo.

Franchise dealers charge massively for new crated engines, along with the labour of course, I’ve no doubt they charge well over the odds for electric motors and battery packs as well.

BEVs won’t automatically cost more to maintain than an ICE, but there’s no doubt that some repairs out of warranty may become ruinously expensive (or not worth it).

Same as any car really, but hopefully in time we’ll eventually get the independent support and repair network that will make it feasible to repair older EVs when required.
 
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