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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello.

New to the Kia E-Niro and also to automatic gear boxes. My last car was a car where the electronic 'handbrake' automatically applied whenever you turned the ignition off. In the Niro, I have never got it to auto apply, apart form once which when I went to push the handbrake button the car told em th handbrake was already on.

Is there an order I need to do things when stopping the car for the handbrake to apply automatically. I could swear blind I have seen it happen once, but no matter what order I do things I have to apply it manually

Please help
 

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Is there an order I need to do things when stopping the car for the handbrake to apply automatically. I could swear blind I have seen it happen once, but no matter what order I do things I have to apply it manually
Please help
I think it will only apply automatically if auto hold is engaged when you switch off the car. I find that useful because I do not need or want the parking brake applied when I park in my garage and would find it difficult if it was applied automatically. However, I think if auto hold is set it will be applied when you switch off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That might explain it. Again, auto-hold, coukd be selected to be 'always on' on my old car. I find it dead useful but keep forgetting to press the button at the beginning of the journey. So the time I noticed the handbrake already applied might have been a time I remembered to select auto hold. I will give it a go tomorrow

Many thanks peterca

Phil
 

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Sometimes it comes on automatically, sometimes it doesn’t. I haven’t quite managed to work out what order prevents it.
 

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That might explain it. Again, auto-hold, coukd be selected to be 'always on' on my old car. I find it dead useful but keep forgetting to press the button at the beginning of the journey. So the time I noticed the handbrake already applied might have been a time I remembered to select auto hold. I will give it a go tomorrow

Many thanks peterca

Phil
Yes, it's the auto hold what does it. But why the frig can't you set it on by default? My start-up checklist is auto hold on, lane keep off and regen 0 (auto on by default), and sometime VESS off, too.
 

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As a new EV driver, I’m curious why you always set regen to 0?
I prefer level 0 if I'm going to be using cruise control cos anything else means a jarring brake that is hard to predict time-wise when disabling it. Also it's just fun to coast.

I never use levels 1 or 2. Level 3 for near-one-pedal town driving with lots of speed changes, level 0 otherwise.
 

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Sometimes it comes on automatically, sometimes it doesn’t. I haven’t quite managed to work out what order prevents it.
Did some tests. Stop, press P foot off the brake, wait a moment, power off. No EPB. The pause before turning the car off is important, otherwise it will engage the EPB.

Though I’m increasingly of the opinion this is the wrong way round and cars should use the brakes and get rid of the parking pall. Sandy Munro was recently criticising Ford for the Mach-E drive assembly and commented a transmission lock is unnecessary cost, weight and complexity when a line of code that puts the EPB on is much better. Have to agree.
 

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Isn't the point of the transmission lock to guarantee the car won't move if parked on a steep hill and the friction brake isn't strong enough to hold it reliably? It was introduced on ICE automatics because the "leave it in gear" trick wasn't available.
Of course, old-school manual cable handbrakes often didn't work very well. Is a modern EPB more trustworthy, so we don't need the backup?
 

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Living in a hilly area I often have to park on steep hills. I would not be happy with any single system holding a car from running away. I’m sure the idea is to have safety redundancy with 2 completely independent systems always in place, either of which can hold the car. Then should one fail in any way, the other takes the strain. Obviously the effect of a driverless runaway vehicle would be a disaster.

I can’t understand why selecting P (or powering off) doesn’t always engage the EPB (though I know some don’t seem to want this, we have discussed it before) Peter
 
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I prefer level 0 if I'm going to be using cruise control cos anything else means a jarring brake that is hard to predict time-wise when disabling it. Also it's just fun to coast.

I never use levels 1 or 2. Level 3 for near-one-pedal town driving with lots of speed changes, level 0 otherwise.
It's a very blunt tool - coasting down a hill, increasing your speed and then coasting back up the other side to slow down will use less energy than recuperating some kWh down the hill whilst maintaining speed, then needing more acceleration to climb the hill. Same with obstacles, etc. Wind resistance, speed limits, drag etc all thrown in too of course.

Personally, I am always actively changing regen levels, exploiting it as a variable engine brake. Then pulling & holding the increase lever to come to a stop, without touching the brakes.

In a way, it replaces some of the lost pleasure of driving a manual ICE. I'm weird though, I don't like the simple one peddle to go and one peddle to stop way of driving, I love manual gear boxes and having to think about which gear and when etc.
 

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As a new EV driver, I’m curious why you always set regen to 0?
You're probably wondering about miles/kWh. Bear in mind that the brake pedal does exactly the same as a high regen setting, slowing the car as effectively as level 4 (holding the left paddle) using regen alone before bringing the friction brakes into play. The advantage of level 0 (+ AUTO or the car does run away with you down the slightest incline) is that the car will keep rolling under its own momentum so you can approach every hazard with the right foot ready over the brake pedal, just in case, but mostly just keep rolling smoothly on. With one-pedal driving your foot has to keep pressing the accelerator or you'll slow rapidly. However, as long as your progress is equally smooth, it makes no difference to efficiency either way. The same goes for drive mode, incidentally. The power on tap is the same in all three. Set the car up in whatever way you prefer, anticipate the power requirement well in advance and you'll get maximum efficiency.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You're probably wondering about miles/kWh. Bear in mind that the brake pedal does exactly the same as a high regen setting, slowing the car as effectively as level 4 (holding the left paddle) using regen alone before bringing the friction brakes into play. The advantage of level 0 (+ AUTO or the car does run away with you down the slightest incline) is that the car will keep rolling under its own momentum so you can approach every hazard with the right foot ready over the brake pedal, just in case, but mostly just keep rolling smoothly on. With one-pedal driving your foot has to keep pressing the accelerator or you'll slow rapidly. However, as long as your progress is equally smooth, it makes no difference to efficiency either way. The same goes for drive mode, incidentally. The power on tap is the same in all three. Set the car up in whatever way you prefer, anticipate the power requirement well in advance and you'll get maximum efficiency.
Ok, so now I am learning. Using the footbrake will initially utilise the regen rather than directly applying pad to disc?
I currently use the paddels to use the regen as a variable brake (as describend by Whitling2k above) assuming that using the foot brake was 'wasting energy'. But effectively the paddles and the foot brake have the same effect, is that right? (Apart from the disc brakes finally being applied if they need to be)

Is it a healthy procedure to use the regen even to slow form high speeds? (I am thinking exiting a motorway, disengage crusie control at start of slip lane and then use variable regen to come to a stand). Is there a risk yhat a too heavy demand could be placed on the regen? Don't want to be practicing anything that could brake the Niro!!!

Just on the EPB thing, yes, I have found if 'Auto Hold' is engaged, the EPB engages automatically when STOP is pressed. So like most others, it is another button I have added to my start up procedure
 

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@doningtonphil said:
Ok, so now I am learning. Using the footbrake will initially utilise the regen rather than directly applying pad to disc? Yes absolutely. Unless you’re braking quite hard ALL the foot braking is by regen only. Friction brakes cut in at very low speeds when regen braking is inadequate.

I currently use the paddels to use the regen as a variable brake (as describend by Whitling2k above) assuming that using the foot brake was 'wasting energy'. But effectively the paddles and the foot brake have the same effect, is that right? (Apart from the disc brakes finally being applied if they need to be)
Correct

Is it a healthy procedure to use the regen even to slow form high speeds? (I am thinking exiting a motorway, disengage crusie control at start of slip lane and then use variable regen to come to a stand). Is there a risk yhat a too heavy demand could be placed on the regen? Don't want to be practicing anything that could brake the Niro!!!
It’s perfectly ok. The computers would not allow any harmful overload or similar activity to occur. The battery capacity is huge so can easily absorb the energy and the motor control inverter electronics etc are designed to take anything the driver can possibly throw at it. Just be aware that at extra high speeds, the regen only slowing down force will appear less than when at urban speeds. The maximum regen power is capped to stay within safe operating limits.

Just on the EPB thing, yes, I have found if 'Auto Hold' is engaged, the EPB engages automatically when STOP is pressed. So like most others, it is another button I have added to my start up procedure
I have added a small self adhesive rubber bumpon to my Auto Hold button. I can now locate and operate the button very easily with just tactile feel without taking my eyes off the road. I did the same with the VESS button some time back. I also have the dreaded LKA button wedged in so it’s always off.
Little mods like this make a big difference to my driving satisfaction I find. Peter.
 

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Ok, so now I am learning. Using the footbrake will initially utilise the regen rather than directly applying pad to disc?
I currently use the paddels to use the regen as a variable brake (as describend by Whitling2k above) assuming that using the foot brake was 'wasting energy'. But effectively the paddles and the foot brake have the same effect, is that right? (Apart from the disc brakes finally being applied if they need to be)

Is it a healthy procedure to use the regen even to slow form high speeds? (I am thinking exiting a motorway, disengage crusie control at start of slip lane and then use variable regen to come to a stand). Is there a risk yhat a too heavy demand could be placed on the regen? Don't want to be practicing anything that could brake the Niro!!!

Just on the EPB thing, yes, I have found if 'Auto Hold' is engaged, the EPB engages automatically when STOP is pressed. So like most others, it is another button I have added to my start up procedure
I don't think there's ever any risk of overloading the regen system. Even at 100% SoC the battery can still accept more kW input than quite sharp deceleration is going to generate. You can see roughly what regen you're getting by the blue blobs on the power display in front of you. And on the central screen you can display the actual numbers and compare using regen versus brake pedal down a known hill, for example.
 

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I don't think there's ever any risk of overloading the regen system. Even at 100% SoC the battery can still accept more kW input than quite sharp deceleration is going to generate.
In a Niro maybe. When I had a LEAF, the regen was notably weak or absent when the battery was over 90%, and the dashboard display has quite a nice indicator of how much regen is available, with the current regen level overlaid on it.
In either case, the motor/battery management system always limits regen to a safe level based on SoC. I think the Niro has more of a top buffer for the battery.
 
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