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Hi - I'm looking to increase my knowledge around EV Charging from an electrical engineering point of view. I have a background in engineering but little experience on the electrical side, so I'm looking to start from the basics. Was wondering if any electrical engineers here, who maybe work in the industry, have suggestions for books or websites to read to start building a good foundation of knowledge?

Thanks in advance!
 

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EV Charging electrical supply side is no different from any other type of electrical supply.

You don't mention if this in design of power distribution networks and network modelling or connection of individual chargers to the grid.
 

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Have a look on wikipedia at J1772 specs. This will give you an intro to the sorts of voltages & currents, protocols etc being used, from low-power 6A 110V AC (USA Type-1 & Type-2) up to 80A AC (domestic tends to run out at 32A single phase but could in principle have domestic 32A 3-phase if prepared to pay for it!) and beyond that up the the high-power DC stuff. Good luck!
 

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Have a look on wikipedia at J1772 specs. This will give you an intro to the sorts of voltages & currents, protocols etc being used, from low-power 6A 110V AC (USA Type-1 & Type-2) up to 80A AC (domestic tends to run out at 32A single phase but could in principle have domestic 32A 3-phase if prepared to pay for it!) and beyond that up the the high-power DC stuff. Good luck!
Electrical Engineers will almost certainly be involved in design of power distribution networks to support EV charging, whilst connection of individual chargers, certainly low power domestic ones is in the domain of tradesmen.
 

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EV Charging from an electrical engineering point of view
That covers everything from generation through transmission, distribution, conversion and delivery to storage. As such it includes virtually every electrical and electronic subject I can think of, from 3-phase power theory to micro-chips.

Can you narrow down your particular areas of interest?
 

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Electrical Engineers will almost certainly be involved in design of power distribution networks to support EV charging, whilst connection of individual chargers, certainly low power domestic ones is in the domain of tradesmen.
True. But to understand the requirements to be satisfied up at the high power Grid level, you need to understand what the customers are up to at the domestic level, and why suddenly 6-10 million of them all decided to load the grid at 7 kW per customer. You won't be surprised that this might happen 'coz the wind generation has suddenly surged and the price of Units has gone negative... so it's important to understand what these customers can & cannot do with their EVs, V2G, V2H etc, and home heatpump installations as well as looks like they're going to be another, even bigger consumer of Units, that transport might be.
 

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True. But to understand the requirements to be satisfied up at the high power Grid level, you need to understand what the customers are up to at the domestic level, and why suddenly 6-10 million of them all decided to load the grid at 7 kW per customer. You won't be surprised that this might happen 'coz the wind generation has suddenly surged and the price of Units has gone negative... so it's important to understand what these customers can & cannot do with their EVs, V2G, V2H etc, and home heatpump installations as well as looks like they're going to be another, even bigger consumer of Units, that transport might be.
Yes but Electrical Power Engineering at grid level and even by DNOs makes use of statistical analysis and does not need to take into account diddly little individual connections.
 

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Was wondering if any electrical engineers here, who maybe work in the industry, have suggestions for books or websites to read to start building a good foundation of knowledge?
I got my EE degree in 1988.


Math is essential.

Algebra - You need Alegbra and linear equations.
Trigonmetry
Calculus is semi-optional. I never use it anymore. Differential Calculus is going to be helpful.
Laplace Transforms optional.
FFT - you don't need to know how it works but you need to understand what it does. It is especially important to understand converting between time and frequency domain.


You need a foundation in DC Circuit Analysis - There are on-line resources. I'm not able to recommend a current book - there are plenty out there. I gave this a quick check and it looks ok --> Circuit analysis | Electrical engineering | Science | Khan Academy


Microelectronics Jacob Milman - My university textbook is still around. You can get it used on Amazon. You are going to need the math skills above to make sense of this book.


3-phase power systems and Electric Machines.

Op Amp cookbook ---> OP-AMP COOKBOOK — Part 1

Switch Mode Power Supplies

LiIon Batteries. Battery University should be enough since you really only want to learn about charging --> Basic to Advanced Battery Information from Battery University



Learn SPICE. SPICE is the most important simulation tool. LTSpice is free and a good implementation.


Optional - Learn MATLAB and the various toolbox plug ins. MATLAB / Simulink is another important design tool.

mathworks.com
 

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OP seems to have gone quiet, seems there is enough for him to chew over.
It's like most technical subjects - once you get into it you find it's not quite as simple as Facebook/Twitter contributors make it appear.

Take concrete ... How hard can it be? :)
 
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