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Kona64
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Discussion Starter #1
Looking at a 220mile round trip for a Kona64 (which I don't yet have, so no real experience of miles per kWH etc )
I am expecting to drop off a passenger, slight chance I will also bring them back with me, but if not I can play on the return with the drive modes to eek out the battery If it looks like too close for comfort I can have an unexpected stop at just time cost to me , not them.
How was the return leg ? Traffic was hell, took me longer, stopped at one point 15mins not going anywhere. o : )

In theory I should manage to eek it out (motorway 90% of the trip) and get back home without charging, then I can recharge at home, and my cost for the trip will be
14.8p per kWh domestic electricity .... a tad high I know, but just changed to that from 17.5p so hey
x 90% say of the Kona battery = 0.9 x 64
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£8.52 ---- right ?

If I bottle it and decide halfway turn around to use a rapid, drawing 1/4 of tank ( 0.25x64 ) which would let me start off back home with battery at 75%, that adding 1/4 tank will cost me ( at 35p rate, shudder ) £5.60

Of course I won't need to pay so much at home to be back at the 90. Using a-better-route-planner confirms the rough logic so I would be back home at 25%. so then to put back level with plan A would be 90-25 = 65% to put back in. So that's £6 odd at home rates.

So yes the midday 1/4tank add is costing £3 or so more to whole trip cost, and I do realise I'm basically comparing using in old school days a motorway-services-p/litre for unleaded vs an Asda around the corner at home.
But, if I do bring the passenger back, it should only take 20mins on a rapid to add that in, and I can do that whilst they are out of the vehicle, then it's straight home without any sweat beads dripping down, literally too ,as I can have the air con on.

Hopefully someone will agree/correct my maths, and I hope this helps others not yet with a BEV who want to understand what costs could be. PS to them, diesel £1.10 litre, at 50mpg the trip would be £22. Happy BEV Days.
 

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For a 220 miles round trip in summer and cruising on the motorway, your need to recharge will mainly depend on how fast you need to travel.
Its likely to not be necessary at all unless you need to maintain 70 mph with a/c on all the time, and even then it could well be not necessary. Slowing because of heavy traffic would probably be helpful for mileage.
With the current warmish weather I find in my Kona 64 that the range driving on mainly A and B roads and without trying to be economical, is over 300 miles...
 

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£3 to not be sweating or worrying about a delay or diversion when you are on the way home? ... Cheap at twice the price.

But I'm not as tight as some people :)
 

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When charging at home it is not quite that simple, if your battery requires 64Kw's of electric to charge from zero to completely full. You also have to allow for, on average 10% loss, this is caused by leakage from the wiring and the AC to DC conversion you vehicle has to do to put main electricity into the traction battery.

Example: 14.8P per Kw * 10% = 16.28P per Kw (or 64Kwh *10% = 70.4Kwh - 70.4*14.8P = £10.42)

64Kwh * 16.28P = £10.42

The add VAT @ 5% = 52P so the total cast of a home charge is £10.94

There is negligible loss on DC charging as it is DC going into a DC battery, any conversion loss is the responsibility of the Rapid Charger owner, you only pay for the KW's that go into your battery.
 

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5 minutes at a rapid charger will probably be ample with a warm mostly empty battery to put 25 miles of range into a Kona to get you home comfortably. As a first trip out it will probably settle the nerves. With time you will learn how accurate your car's remaining range is.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Great comments and help, thanks all !
 

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When I got my ev over 3 years ago I used to challenge my mental arithmetic on long journeys as to what it would cost and what it did cost. Eventually it dawned on me what ever way I looked at it I was saving money added to a relaxed driving experience. Once you find a reliable charge network the cost becomes secondary to turning up and the kit working, in my case Instavolt or Geniepoint both at the more expensive end of rapid charging but IMO better than most others.
 

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I'd also with EV coming look to get another rate on your electricity at home, even 14.8p is on the "expensive side". See the other threads on here for EV specific charge plans -> most are 5-8p to charge. We looked and Octopus Agile will work best for "our" use case, given we work from home and use lots of non peak 4-7pm electric.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yes the next plan is to get down further from the 14p, but it seems some smart meters are less smart than other meters, and I don't have the funds to pay to be on the Octopus 6month wait time for their one
( I understand you have to pay up front to get theirs, and then wait 6 months to get one, to take advantage of the 4hr cheapie time).
Before I can move to that tariff they don't seem to have a tariff in my area that is way better than a non Octopus -- but we're a tad off thread here, my original Q was about working out the the costs and people can then sub their own particular circumstance of p per kWH.
 

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Yes the next plan is to get down further from the 14p, but it seems some smart meters are less smart than other meters, and I don't have the funds to pay to be on the Octopus 6month wait time for their one
( I understand you have to pay up front to get theirs, and then wait 6 months to get one, to take advantage of the 4hr cheapie time).
Before I can move to that tariff they don't seem to have a tariff in my area that is way better than a non Octopus -- but we're a tad off thread here, my original Q was about working out the the costs and people can then sub their own particular circumstance of p per kWH.
Remember when you go onto cheap rate limited time overnight charging you may want to stop at a rapid to get enough juice to be sure your limted time cheap rate electric can charge the car to the desired level.
 
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I'd comment octopus are installing meters again now, and we've got an appointment for this Thursday for our move to Agile. But there is a massive backlog on Octopus, so I'd avoid that until you have a meter -ie If you can, get current provider to install a modern smets2 meter, then move, as likely it'll be quicker. And installing smart meters is "usually" free given the fact that electricity companies will be fined by Government for not meeting smart meter targets. Just be wary if they want to lock you in a year given you want a cheaper tariff in long term.

Note above advice stands EVEN if you not going Octopus, all the small cheaper EV charging electricity companies have meter backlogs AIUI.
 
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