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Discussion Starter #1
I'm not sure if this has be put forward before, but, (as I cannot access the Owners Manual yet) is anyone aware if the first charge or subsequent charges, should be done when then battery SOC drops to about 5%?

By tomorrow I will be below 50% SOC and was going to charge up, when the conditioning issue occurred to me.

Comments welcomed.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You'll have to forgive me and my terminology, I'm new to this and not technically gifted/trained.

I have read somewhere, most probably related to mobile phone batteries, that with new ones it is best to drain them fully and repeat this several times.

Is this effectively the same with car batteries? Taking into account you would have to sufficient charge get to a charging point rather than conked out on a road.
 

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battery management:
In a Phone your battery can be drained to zero % and charged to 100% and this is what reduces their capacity over only a number of months

while the battery in EVs are very similar in their makeup, the way the battery is managed by the car is different.

The car will not let you use all the battery capacity and will also not allow you to charge to full capacity

this is why people state the e208 only has 46-47kWh usable when the battery is a 50kwh battery.

so while it is only a small amount, it serves to protect the life of the battery.

(we don’t have this in our phones because 1. It would require a battery management system and 2. We’d never buy the next phone ;)

battery conditioning:
Linked to the above, this initial cycling (I had similar instructions on my new laptop battery) are aimed at maximising battery capacity to get the 8hrs battery life you thought you were buying.
I’ve not seen much for EVs around this apart from not leaving the car at high charge or low charge for extended periods (like a month)

Balancing:
The EV battery is made up of many many many smaller batteries (cells)
These cells discharge and recharge at ever so different rates.
so in order that the whole battery is fully charged (and doesn’t have half the cells at half the power - exaggeration) then the car will balance all the cells (a discharge and recharge cycle when almost fully charged to make surearl the cells are at the same charge)

these are my non scientific ramblings and how I like to explain them so I understand haha

the science is way more complex but also way more boring (to me) and I’m an aero engineer haha!

In short - unless it’s stated in the book, don’t worry. You have a warranty so enjoy the car.

JJ
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks.

The car has 100,000 miles or 8 year battery warranty.

I don't tend to keep cars longer than 4 years anyhow.

But it's good to know.
 
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