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I have a 2014 Outlander PHEV VRX, bought as an ex. demo April 2015.
It has now done 138,000km.

As it passed 120,000km it started causing concern over reducing battery range. One day, the range dropped quickly and got down to 10km. I took it in to my dealer, who couldn't establish the reason.
In consultaion with the National distributor and Mitsubishi Japan, they requested I drop it in for a full battery test and recovery proceedure sending the results to Japan.

This was done twice. After the second, the battery had recovered to where Japan said it was within spec for its age and mileage. They still had no answer for the sudden drop.

Since then, I have been driving it more gently, as in the years owning it, I had been a bit of a leadfoot, enjoying its performance. On one occaision, I raced a Ford Falcon ute, (pickup), with its 4lt six cyl. up a local mountain range. Lots of corners. As I went around the last corner at the top, the battery quit and a warning came up that EV mode was not available. I had run it right out. PS. I beat the Falcon...

Lately, the range has been dropping again. From new, the max range I got was 38.6km. This was reasonable in light of how I was driving. But lately it has reduced to just on 20km driving carefully.

My excellent dealer offered to do another proceedure for free, to see if they could improve it any more. Mitsubishi NZ said as it was out of warranty and the fact that batteries are known to degrade over time, they couldn't offer any support.
My dealer, and I want to mention them, Simon Lucas Mitsubishi in Glenfield NZ, has gone above and beyond anything I could ever have expected. They have been amazingly generous and supportive.

They offered to replace the battery for half their cost price! Even so, I can't afford that yet, but that offer is incredible!

The sad reality is that the experience has put me off EV's. Having to replace a battery after 5yrs and 130,000km makes longer term ownership uneconomic by comparison with petrol or diesel. My vehicle is worth very little to sell or trade, unless I replace the battery.
 

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This is a problem for your car, but if you were to go full EV today its much less of a concern. Battery chemistry has greatly improved over the years, and the capacity of those batteries have gotten bigger and bigger. Something like a 64kWh Hyundai Kona for example will have a few % of degradation after 5 years but that loss may only be worth about 10 miles of a ~250 mile range battery.

If I buy any new EV today I won't need to be replacing the battery in 5 years.

Also, where you are right now, temperatures are colder and weather is wet. These all have an effect on your range. Quite a significant impact on such a small battery pack. It may well be that the degradation isn't as bad as you first think and these are just normal variations, since you said that the range had recovered before when you spoke to Mitsubishi about range issues.
 

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The sad reality is that the experience has put me off EV's. Having to replace a battery after 5yrs and 130,000km makes longer term ownership uneconomic by comparison with petrol or diesel. My vehicle is worth very little to sell or trade, unless I replace the battery.
This is a known problem with hybrids. They have a small battery that in normal operation is regularly run almost flat and then recharged, thus using up cycles of life. (Being run very low is also damaging, though the car shouldn't really allow that.) Obviously hard driving is likely to make that worse.
A full EV (BEV) shouldn't suffer so much as they do many more miles per charge and don't generally get run down to near empty on a regular basis. This they don't go through cycles at near the same rate. The reputable makes also come with many more years of warranty on the battery.

But to some extent you are right. At present there is a bit of a question mark over full-life costs of BEVs because they haven't been around long enough to get meaningful data. And Nissan hasn't helped with their somewhat unhelpful activities around batteries.
 
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