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I’ve also messed about replacing engines and gearboxes from scrap yards for friends fixing up their old bangers with them, but I have a healthy respect for lithium batteries. I was careless once ripping apart an old power tool battery, one of the 18650’s must have shorted and went off like a firework…
:unsure:
Been there done that. Power tool batteries are pretty capable


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For context, my last three car changes were in 1991, 2002 and 2011. I start from the presumption that any car I buy these days should last me about 10 years, and I expect my next car to be a BEV.
Do you buy your cars new, and if so what category of buyer would you say you were in? e.g. Are you a Ford Focus middle-of-the-road purchaser, or more high end?
 

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Do you buy your cars new, and if so what category of buyer would you say you were in? e.g. Are you a Ford Focus middle-of-the-road purchaser, or more high end?
I know your question wasn't directed at me but I like to think I can get a year for every grand I spend on a used car...

I'll get 13yrs out of this ampera if it kills me fixing it :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #64 ·
Do you buy your cars new, and if so what category of buyer would you say you were in? e.g. Are you a Ford Focus middle-of-the-road purchaser, or more high end?
Definitely not high end! Currently driving a Golf, before that a Corolla. Prefer to buy new, regarding early depreciation as somewhat offset by long retention period, knowing everything about the car’s history, and getting the exact spec I want.
 

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Definitely not high end! Currently driving a Golf, before that a Corolla. Prefer to buy new, regarding early depreciation as somewhat offset by long retention period, knowing everything about the car’s history, and getting the exact spec I want.
That is interesting, so over the course of say 10-12 years how much would you budget on the car (in total), then add running costs associated with servicing, MOT's, and fuel? There is a reason for these questions, that will be come clear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #67 ·
That is interesting, so over the course of say 10-12 years how much would you budget on the car (in total), then add running costs associated with servicing, MOT's, and fuel? There is a reason for these questions, that will be come clear.
Ha, there’s a whole discussion to be had around ownership strategies/models, and the many and varied reasons for the different choices that suit different people, which surely deserves a thread to itself!
 

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Ha, there’s a whole discussion to be had around ownership strategies/models, and the many and varied reasons for the different choices that suit different people, which surely deserves a thread to itself!
While that is true, my questions are genuine and go unanswered. Your uncertainty and ownership model may offer the ability to combat the degradation issue you raised, depending on your TCO, which needs to be known (approximately) in order to figure out if my idea is possible.
 

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I own both a 200k mile Corolla and 9 yo Leafs degraded by 25% so I can chip in.

First of all, buying new is where you will take the biggest no matter how the car is propelled.
EV’s have generally higher residuals but proportionally higher purchase costs, so you’ll take a bigger hit on depreciation.

But between the lower “fuel cost” and lower servicing, you will get ahead anyway.
How much you get ahead depends on your yearly mileage. The more you drive, the more the EV makes sense.

Last but not least, overpriced EV’s will never reach cost parity with a comparable fossil fuel powered car.
Early 100k Model S are going for 20k now and the only reason is that they have free supercharging for the life of the car.
There is no way to make up for that depreciation.

Early Leafs were sold for 25k and now go for about 5k. There you could make up thr additional depreciation with lower servicing and fuel costs, but still, it won’t be ginormous.

If you want to save money, the only way to go is a cheap used EV and run it until the battery is kaput.
Let the (pretend-)rich people parade with the new toys and take their losses, then pick up tried and tested amazing cars for peanuts.
 

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Tesla batteries seem to last forever !
 

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Tesla batteries seem to last forever !
I wonder if one of the big contributing factors of the Tesla batteries lasting long is the fairly shallow charge/discharges. I doubt many owners use the whole battery very frequently rather run it down to maybe 30/40% and then charge it back up, then it'll last them another x days before it needs a charge again. Not going right down to near bottom of capacity is better for the cells whereas the majority of other EVs of a similar age had small batteries and could be run down to <10% daily on a commute.

~300,000 miles on a battery is definitely what I would call a fair life cycle, although the sudden failure would be a bit of a headache for an owner if the car had been 10+ years old and out of warranty. Really they got lucky the pack failed in such a way Tesla replaced it under warranty so in theory they've got another 200k before the new pack dies.
 

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They replaced the battery under warranty. The fact the car has done 400k now and still going is very impressive. It shows how durable the electric drivetrain is. They have tried to break the motors. They can do well over a million miles with no degradation to performance and no maintenance .
 
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