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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone tell me how to check the state of charge of the high voltage battery whilst driving? I have yet to find a way of seeing the battery % on any of the car's widgets / screens. Yes, I can see it in the app, but that's not practical when driving.

My old eGolf and i3 both showed the battery % in the main display. Reading the manual for my ID.3, it seems it only shows the % if it goes dangerously low. Does anyone know different?
 

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VW ID.3 Worst Edition & Tesla M3 LR
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On the main screen, go to the Vehicle display, the one with the car in it, then the top icon on that screen gives you the battery state of charge.

It also appears in the steering wheel screen, but only once you’ve hit 10%.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The point is, it was easily visible, and wasn't a distraction. The i3 shows it in % format in the main display. It's hard to argue that the ID.3 hiding this info is in any way helpful to the driver.
 

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Ahh, I don't class that as a % display.
It's not even divided into 10ths.
It does give more info than the ID3 does on the screen behind the wheel but the main screen will show the actual %, which I prefer.
It would be even better if the % was permanently displayed right in front of our eyes.
 

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The point is, it was easily visible, and wasn't a distraction. The i3 shows it in % format in the main display. It's hard to argue that the ID.3 hiding this info is in any way helpful to the driver.
It’s easily visible in the ID.3 main screen as well though, not sure I’d say it’s distracting either?

Still, the e-Golf did help my 12.5 times table! 🙂
 

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Having a percentage sign steadily counting down a percent every 2 miles or so is going to drive the range anxiety in some people completely insane.

People already extrapolate the GOM for total range when that's not an accurate representation of distance available. Adding a % into the mix will cause the same problems and its not helpful to the cause.

For those that want the number, it's easily available (it's 1 tap away from how I have my screens set up) and for the majority who don't want the anxiety, it's kept out of your eye line.

VW, like all manufacturers, spend a fortune on human factors experts, focus groups and psychologists to get their cars the way they are. They might read a forum or 2 for feedback but I doubt it as the information posted is just too biased towards the minority who more often have an axe to grind.

The battery SOC guage is similar to fuel guages which did nothing more than provide a rough indication and never a percentage (or a volume) of fuel used or remaining. Nobody complained and now there is a fascination with exact amount of charge stemmed from a time gone by when electric cars did 60 miles, tops. That's not an issue for most people anymore.

Most people just don't care, they will charge up at home or when the car tells them. They don't loose sleep over whether they are getting 2.5m/kwh or 3.0m/kwh or whether they should have the heating set at 18c or if they should charge to 80% or 100%. They get in the car, drive it and then plug it back in.

Most families who have an electric car, still have a conventional car as a backup.
 

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If the psychologists and focus groups determined that the SoC %age should be kept off the main display until 10% is remaining...

... why does VW write the basic battery management rules to say to not leave it below 20% (in summer) or 40% (in winter)?

Hard to follow the warranty "rules" if the required info is hidden from you.

Putting devil's advocate aside, it is hard for a corporation to determine how its users think.
Some people want to think percentages (my guess is those who aspire to manage the life of their batteries), some want to think in distance terms. Some don't want to have to think.

If I think of my fossil refuel habits... I'd mostly just refuel at a convenient time when the gauge vaguely pointed between one third and one quarter. If I started a long journey and the tank was less than 50%, I'd roughly figure how best to fill it cheaply en-route. Preferably not MSA, so a question of either near-end or far-end, or one of a few well-known off-motorway stops.

So one method by rough percentage. One roughly by miles, or just habit. Even I'm not consistent.

The psychology eye-opener for me was the question on how do you measure time, when asked to estimate a minute. Some people visualize it as a second hand ticking (so you disrupt them by showing them images). Others by counting seconds at a steady rate (disrupted by talking to them). I'm the latter, and even knowing the two methods, I can't do the visualization.

Everyone just learns a method that suits them. And now we have an EV, I badly need to figure out how the wife does her judgement :(
 

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If the psychologists and focus groups determined that the SoC %age should be kept off the main display until 10% is remaining...

... why does VW write the basic battery management rules to say to not leave it below 20% (in summer) or 40% (in winter)?

Hard to follow the warranty "rules" if the required info is hidden from you.
‘Ze rules’ only apply when the car isn’t being used, you can go as low or high as you like when driving, as long as you plan to recharge it ASAP in the case of the former.

As for the other stuff, people work stuff out. People will probably only run out of charge the once, before different behaviours kick in! 🙂
 

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Charging is very different to filling a car with petrol/diesel.

When I was running on diesel I visited the pump as infrequently as possible as it required a special trip and the car would do 500+ miles between fill ups. Brimming the tank and running down to 5 miles left and leaving it in either state made no difference to the car at all.
I'd add as much as I could when I was nearly empty and going past a lower priced fuel station.

Now I set the slider to 70 or 80% and plug in when I get home, unless the battery is already at 60+% or I'm not going to use the car the next day.
When I need more range I charge to 90 or 100%. Its very simple to look after the battery as VW suggest once you get used to it with any car that has the max % setting.
It's harder on cars like the e-Golf that don't have that unless you use the inbuilt timers, which I don't.

I imagine most people run out of change as often as they ran out of fuel in the ice.
For most that's never. Cars give so many warnings that it requires deliberate effort to run out
 

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Charging is very different to filling a car with petrol/diesel.
See, I don't think it is. You plug it in when it needs it. The difference being that for a lot of people, you don't have to stand there doing your best teapot impression whilst it pumps itself in. You can either do it at home overnight or, in a lot of cases, there's facilities of service stations or shopping areas very near to these charge points to amuse yourself whilst you top up the battery.

The amount of users that will consume full batteries during the day and require longer charging sessions to continue their business, is pretty small.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I wonder why the psychologists who used to work for VW (on the eGolf), or who currently work for other EV manufacturers (BMW, Polestar for example) think their drivers need a more obvious and measurable SoC. I don't like having to hunt around for what is pretty basic and important (however much people argue it's not) information.
 

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An accurate range of miles remaining is surely far more useful than a percentage battery remaining to somebody who doesn’t spend all their waking hours checking SpeakEV (like me! 😂), surely?

I’m 15 miles from my destination, the car says I’ve got 25, I’m good. Lot easier than converting a %, the car is doing that on the fly constantly anyway.
 

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Having a percentage sign steadily counting down a percent every 2 miles or so is going to drive the range anxiety in some people completely insane.

People already extrapolate the GOM for total range when that's not an accurate representation of distance available. Adding a % into the mix will cause the same problems and its not helpful to the cause.

For those that want the number, it's easily available (it's 1 tap away from how I have my screens set up) and for the majority who don't want the anxiety, it's kept out of your eye line.

VW, like all manufacturers, spend a fortune on human factors experts, focus groups and psychologists to get their cars the way they are. They might read a forum or 2 for feedback but I doubt it as the information posted is just too biased towards the minority who more often have an axe to grind.

The battery SOC guage is similar to fuel guages which did nothing more than provide a rough indication and never a percentage (or a volume) of fuel used or remaining. Nobody complained and now there is a fascination with exact amount of charge stemmed from a time gone by when electric cars did 60 miles, tops. That's not an issue for most people anymore.

Most people just don't care, they will charge up at home or when the car tells them. They don't loose sleep over whether they are getting 2.5m/kwh or 3.0m/kwh or whether they should have the heating set at 18c or if they should charge to 80% or 100%. They get in the car, drive it and then plug it back in.

Most families who have an electric car, still have a conventional car as a backup.
I agree...I have no desire for a percentage - I’d rather a minimalist design. More than happy with the little battery picture - does the same as a petrol gauge.

And we are a 2 EV household - both EVs (different manufacturers) work the same way - no percentage; just range remaining and a visual guide (battery in this one, little bar thing in the other). 2 years in I’ve never once thought “I wish I could see the exact percentage of battery I have left now”......
 

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I agree...I have no desire for a percentage - I’d rather a minimalist design. More than happy with the little battery picture - does the same as a petrol gauge.

And we are a 2 EV household - both EVs (different manufacturers) work the same way - no percentage; just range remaining and a visual guide (battery in this one, little bar thing in the other). 2 years in I’ve never once thought “I wish I could see the exact percentage of battery I have left now”......
I think it’s fair enough to be able to see a percentage remaining figure if you want it, and in the ID.3 that’s only 2 presses of a finger away.

You lose the main map screen doing so though, but hey, you can’t have everything right?

It just seems to be another one of those things that EV owners/drivers seem to divide over. 😂
 

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I think the option of having one there, a bit like the way I can turn it on or off in my phone, would be a worthwhile thing to have. It would allow those who want it on the small display to have it there, and those who want a clean display to have it turned off.
 

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I have my own thoughts on the % being displayed.

VW seems to say what is best for the battery, the best lowest % and the highest %, given that I believe the % should be displayed on the steering wheel display next to the state of charge display.
 

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The battery % whilst driving has no effect on the life of the battery. The BMS looks after it.

The 'concerns' (if that's the right word) over battery condition are when it's parked up and varies between parking durations.

I'd suggest that the % when driving is irrelevant but on stopping the car, the % is shown in the same manner as the total odometer is displayed would be much more useful.
 
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