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We own a LEAF HATCHBACK Tekna 30kW 5dr Auto [6.6kW Charger] - not sure what gen it is but bought in early 2016. Anyway it's range is about 90miles now after 90,000 miles and we're considering either selling it or replacing the batteries to get more life/range out of it.

We live in High Wycombe in the UK and I came across Muxsan as a battery extended and replacement.

I'm curious if the economics work out. Can we replace the 30kw with 40 and extend in the boot for sensible money versus selling the car and buying alternative make/model?

Is anything else like the motor likely to fail as we reach 100k+ miles?

I can't see a fitter in the UK, only Range Therapy in Ireland and the manufactuer in Netherlands.

Thoughts please!
 

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Cleevely's used to fit them but stopped last year: Battery Upgrades - Cleevely Electric Vehicles Gloucestershire

I'm not convinced it's a cost effective option; with our Leaf, we effectively retired it into use a a second car and when we come to sell it I'm sure it will still be desirable as a short range second car for the next owner; it's been so reliable apart from the expected range reduction given age+mileage that I would see it going on for a good while yet. I'd be more inclined to upgrade to another car in your position.
 
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We own a LEAF HATCHBACK Tekna 30kW 5dr Auto [6.6kW Charger] - not sure what gen it is but bought in early 2016. Anyway it's range is about 90miles now after 90,000 miles and we're considering either selling it or replacing the batteries to get more life/range out of it.

We live in High Wycombe in the UK and I came across Muxsan as a battery extended and replacement.

I'm curious if the economics work out. Can we replace the 30kw with 40 and extend in the boot for sensible money versus selling the car and buying alternative make/model?

Is anything else like the motor likely to fail as we reach 100k+ miles?

I can't see a fitter in the UK, only Range Therapy in Ireland and the manufactuer in Netherlands.

Thoughts please!
I'm in exactly the same boat as you, Tekna 30kw with 6.6 charger and almost 50,000miles. I wouldn't consider a battery upgrade even at 50kmiles if yours is 100k then definitely not worth it.
There are all the other bits and pieces suspension, brakes, transmission and all the ancillary propulsion battery bits, reduction gears, on board charger etc. to go wrong and an on board charger can cost up to £8000 from Nissan.
 

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Sadly the Utopian world of EVs running forever isn't here yet. Cost of replacing your tired batteries hasn't been remotely financially viable so far, and it'll be that way for at least a decade by my reckoning. Even with the recent increase in used EV values, you've got to have high eco-morals and a lot of spare cash to do it, and that's just a relatively simple Leaf pack. With complicated liquid cooling circuits, a 'structural' element and smallish cells packed with tough plastic filler rendering them unserviceable, the future looks bleak - your EV will die and be scrapped when the batteries no longer hold enough charge.
I sincerely hope EV companies will eventually make the battery packs easier and viable to replace. As things are, they're nowhere near as ecologically sound as they could be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm in exactly the same boat as you, Tekna 30kw with 6.6 charger and almost 50,000miles. I wouldn't consider a battery upgrade even at 50kmiles if yours is 100k then definitely not worth it.
There are all the other bits and pieces suspension, brakes, transmission and all the ancillary propulsion battery bits, reduction gears, on board charger etc. to go wrong and an on board charger can cost up to £8000 from Nissan.
Ok I didn't know about all those other bits so thanks for sharing
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sadly the Utopian world of EVs running forever isn't here yet. Cost of replacing your tired batteries hasn't been remotely financially viable so far, and it'll be that way for at least a decade by my reckoning. Even with the recent increase in used EV values, you've got to have high eco-morals and a lot of spare cash to do it, and that's just a relatively simple Leaf pack. With complicated liquid cooling circuits, a 'structural' element and smallish cells packed with tough plastic filler rendering them unserviceable, the future looks bleak - your EV will die and be scrapped when the batteries no longer hold enough charge.
I sincerely hope EV companies will eventually make the battery packs easier and viable to replace. As things are, they're nowhere near as ecologically sound as they could be.
Hmmm I've been coming to this conclusion and I'm gobsmacked there isn't regulation towards a standard drop-out/in battery pack standard across the industry.
 

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Hmmm I've been coming to this conclusion and I'm gobsmacked there isn't regulation towards a standard drop-out/in battery pack standard across the industry.
That would be too easy and not in tune with the industry's perpetual drive to make vast profits from even the simplest of spare parts. If the whole industry had a standard set of battery packs, 40kw, 80kw, 100kw and 200kw with exactly the same pack used in all the different manufacturers tailored to their own particular configurations, that would be the best solution. Just as the dry cell and rechargeable battery industry has basically settled on the AA and AAA standard, it may eventually (probably not in my lifetime) happen with battery packs for vehicles. The other thing is the way the auto industry works world-wide. A manufacturer designs a vehicle, with all the elctronics set up as a series of input-output modules. They then tender the "boxes" to sub-contractors who are just given the specifications of the inputs given and the outputs required together with maximum dimensions and environment requirements for that particular component or box. The sub-contractor that tenders the cheapest price within specification gets the contract.
The motor manufacturer probably never gets to see the actual schematics and component count-they aren't interested.

This is the reason for instance, why BMW are able to charge North of £2000 for a simple ecu computer. They buy a batch of spares from the supplier that is enough to last 10-15 years then put a massive mark-up on the box. By the time 20 years have passed, the original sub-contrator may have long gone out of business, all the schematics and details of what is inside the box are lost in the mists of time.

There are then only 2 options available to replicate that box. Take the original input-output specs and redesign and build from scratch a replacement, or to reverse engineer the original box. That takes an engineer with a particularly high-level skill set and with the present throw-away society the pool of talent with those sort of skills is shrinking rapidly.

There is a glimmer of hope. The present fascination with mini-computers such as the raspberry and the many young people dabbling in electronics as a result may yet offer a way out of this rabbit hole. It would be a much easier task to replicate and build from scratch such an item, the only issue would be access to the required software from the manufacturers.

They are notoriously secretive when it comes to their proprietary software, but 2021 legislation on the "right to repair" by the EU and the UK is a step forward in making the motor industry conform to legislation. It is a small step, but the principle has now been established; at the moment it only applies to white goods and TV's. The object being to reduce built-in obsolescence and reduce the landfill for scrap white goods and tv's with all their nasty rare elements.

So sorry to all for this long-winded narrative, I just wanted to point out things are not as simple as it seems at first glance.
 
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Hmmm I've been coming to this conclusion and I'm gobsmacked there isn't regulation towards a standard drop-out/in battery pack standard across the industry.
You mean like there isn't for ICE engines and gearboxes?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You mean like there isn't for ICE engines and gearboxes?
ICE and gearboxes don't need changing over regularly. Whereas the need for a better charging infrastructure means local petrol stations could switch pumps for charged battery switchovers on a daily basis. I wasn't talking about switching battery packs when capacity dropped with my dropin/out of the batteries - in that instance I was referring to cutting the time to charge our EVs. It would also by definition fix the end-of-life problems as we'd have a rental programme to switch our batteries for charged ones whenever we needed. BUT it would mean that the battery capacities would have to be minimised to Vanilla, Double Choc or Tutti Fruitti or whatever they would call 40,60,80 kwh packs :)
 

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Hmmm I've been coming to this conclusion and I'm gobsmacked there isn't regulation towards a standard drop-out/in battery pack standard across the industry.
A single pack design would never suit all vehicles. A relatively small number of different common battery pack modules and dimensions, far more likely to occur, mostly because it makes the cell manufacturers work easier.
It still needs someone to crack open a battery pack housing to do module swap, which does need specialist training.
Another thing that would help would be if the vehicle manufacturers stop with their nonsense coding of battery management systems in the packs to a particular vehicle, which would make the possibility of third-party battery pack designs far more feasible.
 

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Another thing that would help would be if the vehicle manufacturers stop with their nonsense coding of battery management systems in the packs to a particular vehicle, which would make the possibility of third-party battery pack designs far more feasible.
On balance, I agree with that, but I'll put the (only) argument in favour of coding expensive components to the vehicle, just by way of balance. It makes it more difficult to sell the parts stripped from a stolen vehicle, because every such part has to be matched and tracked and checked. I don't think this is a valuable enough feature to overwhelm the nuisance and resulting cost or waste which it adds for legitimate repair and sale of parts from scrapped cars, but it's the excuse the manufacturers, dealers and insurers can use.

Indelible and recorded part numbers for components give, I think, 95% of the benefits, especially for something like a battery pack, too heavy and too dangerous to handle in some dodgy black-market workshop.
 

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Indelible and recorded part numbers for components give, I think, 95% of the benefits, especially for something like a battery pack, too heavy and too dangerous to handle in some dodgy black-market workshop.
I agree that coding is a pain, but has been overcome for most manufacturers for battery swaps. It also makes spotting a swap easy via a code reader - much simpler than grovelling around under a car looking for numbers that could have been altered.

Used LEAF 40kW batteries currently swap hands for around £7.5k and are relatively easy to swap, far easier than an ICE engine or gearbox, so are something that criminals might consider stealing. The need for some security is self-evident.
 

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I didn't mean the "indelible" code should be just marked on the bottom of the battery box; I'd expect it to appear in the output from the code reader as well. Any reputable garage fitting or selling a used battery would check those two numbers matched, and were not recorded as stolen. But the car shouldn't be insisting on using only its original battery, nor require a manufacturer's monopoly on allowing it to accept a replacement without a software hack.
 

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I believe @badmanwimmaculatelips has had a Muxsan extender fitted.
Not quite - i went for replacement of my 2012 24kWh pack with a 40kWh pack - done by Cleevely (and sold my old pack on eBay to subsidise part of the total cost). For me and my particular situation and requirements it has proven ideal.
 
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