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Discussion Starter #1
I've recently bought a BMW 330e and found it was charging quite slowly on the 'low' setting (75% charged after being plugged in for nearly 4 hours).

I read that using the faster setting is fine as long as nothing gets hot so I tried this and it didn't get hot at all and charged up significantly quicker (fully charged in 3 hours).

My question is, does using the faster charging speed reduce range at all or would the range be the same regardless of which setting is used?
 

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It shouldn’t make any significant difference to the range. I think for safety, the car is delivered set on the lowest charging rate. If you use a granny charger ie one with a 13 amp plug, it will automatically restrict the charging rate anyway to about 10amps even if you have the car on the highest setting. If you have a proper home charger installed, you can leave the car on the highest charging rate and let the charger control the rate. The maximum charge rate for the 330e is, I think 3.7 kW which is about 16 amps.

If you were concerned about the electrical infrastructure you were using, eg if you were forced to use an extension lead (not really recommended), or had other heavy household electrical loads running and didn’t want to overload your main fuse you could set the charging rate back to a lower value, but it’s generally not necessary. Some slight warming is not unusual, but if cable or fittings do get hot that is at the very least an indication that the rate is too high, and I’d really also suggest, if the reason wasn’t obvious, getting the house electrical system checked for any faults.

By the way do not leave any part of the charging cable coiled up whilst charging. That can cause it to overheat to the point of risking the cable melting or even catching fire.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
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It shouldn’t make any significant difference to the range. I think for safety, the car is delivered set on the lowest charging rate. If you use a granny charger ie one with a 13 amp plug, it will automatically restrict the charging rate anyway to about 10amps even if you have the car on the highest setting. If you have a proper home charger installed, you can leave the car on the highest charging rate and let the charger control the rate. The maximum charge rate for the 330e is, I think 3.7 kW which is about 16 amps.

If you were concerned about the electrical infrastructure you were using, eg if you were forced to use an extension lead (not really recommended), or had other heavy household electrical loads running and didn’t want to overload your main fuse you could set the charging rate back to a lower value, but it’s generally not necessary. Some slight warming is not unusual, but if cable or fittings do get hot that is at the very least an indication that the rate is too high, and I’d really also suggest, if the reason wasn’t obvious, getting the house electrical system checked for any faults.

By the way do not leave any part of the charging cable coiled up whilst charging. That can cause it to overheat to the point of risking the cable melting or even catching fire.
Thanks very much for that info.

I read somewhere (can't remember where now) that the battery might not hold as much charge from a quick charge as it would from a slow charge, but as I said I'm not sure whether there's any truth to this or not.

Out of interest, why might it not be recommended to use an extension cable (for example if it's wired as a permanent wall-mounted outdoor socket of the correct specification, directly plugged into an inside socket which has an RCD safety trip)?
 

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Thanks very much for that info.

I read somewhere (can't remember where now) that the battery might not hold as much charge from a quick charge as it would from a slow charge, but as I said I'm not sure whether there's any truth to this or not.

Out of interest, why might it not be recommended to use an extension cable (for example if it's wired as a permanent wall-mounted outdoor socket of the correct specification, directly plugged into an inside socket which has an RCD safety trip)?
Ok, first off, if you are using the granny charger plugged into a 13 amp socket you are at best only charging at the intermediate rate, about 10amps. Setting the charge rate to fast on the car doesn’t alter this, as the the charger automatically limits the charge rate.

The fast charge rate, which would bring your charge time down to about two hours is about 16 amps, which is over the rating of the plug fuse and the cable used. The only way to charge at that rate at home is to have a dedicated wall charger fitted. It’s well worth doing this if you can as there is a generous grant available, just contact any of the companies who offer wall chargers. It doesn’t have to be a bmw one, any suitable type 2 home charger will do.

You are talking, with the BMW, about the difference between 6 amp charging, 10 amp charging and 16amp charging. None of these really qualify as fast charging! More like quite slow, slow and very slow. There will be minimal difference in battery capacity

A good quality 13 amp rated extension lead will probably be OK. The car manufacturers advise against extension leads because they are the weakest link. There have been cases of people using any old extension cable which often aren’t proper 13 amp rated cable or which have substandard plugs and sockets. Just because a lead has a 13 amp plug on the end doesn’t mean it’s definitelt a 13 amp lead!

Also if you are plugging into a household plug on one of the house ring mains, you have to think what else is plugged in. Ring mains are designed to cope with average loads and are fused up to 32 amps, but if you had a couple of electric heaters plugged into other sockets on the same ring, you could be overloading the ring without realising it. So take care.

A continuous 10 amp current running for 3 hours is a serious electrical load, it will seek out any weak spot in the connections. Once a weakness is found, the dodgy contact or cable will start to overheat, ultimately it can melt the cable or even catch fire. The circuit breaker won’t help until the bare wires touch, which could be too late. The manufacturers of course bias their advice towards the safest advice, ie not to use extensions cables as they don’t want to be liable for your mistake!

As a stopgap or in an emergency until you have a proper charger, and with a good quality extension lead which is wired with cable that is genuinely rated at 13 amps can be used, but I’d suggest with caution and subject to the warnings above.

Any cable with an electric current running through it will start to warm up slightly, that’s just physics. Normall, this heat will just radiate into the air around. Leaving the cable in a coil means the heat can build up and damage or melt even a cable that is nominally the correct size for the current. That’s the reason for insisting that any lead or extension lead is uncoiled before it is used.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi


Ok, first off, if you are using the granny charger plugged into a 13 amp socket you are at best only charging at the intermediate rate, about 10amps. Setting the charge rate to fast on the car doesn’t alter this, as the the charger automatically limits the charge rate.

The fast charge rate, which would bring your charge time down to about two hours is about 16 amps, which is over the rating of the plug fuse and the cable used. The only way to charge at that rate at home is to have a dedicated wall charger fitted. It’s well worth doing this if you can as there is a generous grant available, just contact any of the companies who offer wall chargers. It doesn’t have to be a bmw one, any suitable type 2 home charger will do.

You are talking, with the BMW, about the difference between 6 amp charging, 10 amp charging and 16amp charging. None of these really qualify as fast charging! More like quite slow, slow and very slow. There will be minimal difference in battery capacity

A good quality 13 amp rated extension lead will probably be OK. The car manufacturers advise against extension leads because they are the weakest link. There have been cases of people using any old extension cable which often aren’t proper 13 amp rated cable or which have substandard plugs and sockets. Just because a lead has a 13 amp plug on the end doesn’t mean it’s definitelt a 13 amp lead!

Also if you are plugging into a household plug on one of the house ring mains, you have to think what else is plugged in. Ring mains are designed to cope with average loads and are fused up to 32 amps, but if you had a couple of electric heaters plugged into other sockets on the same ring, you could be overloading the ring without realising it. So take care.

A continuous 10 amp current running for 3 hours is a serious electrical load, it will seek out any weak spot in the connections. Once a weakness is found, the dodgy contact or cable will start to overheat, ultimately it can melt the cable or even catch fire. The circuit breaker won’t help until the bare wires touch, which could be too late. The manufacturers of course bias their advice towards the safest advice, ie not to use extensions cables as they don’t want to be liable for your mistake!

As a stopgap or in an emergency until you have a proper charger, and with a good quality extension lead which is wired with cable that is genuinely rated at 13 amps can be used, but I’d suggest with caution and subject to the warnings above.

Any cable with an electric current running through it will start to warm up slightly, that’s just physics. Normall, this heat will just radiate into the air around. Leaving the cable in a coil means the heat can build up and damage or melt even a cable that is nominally the correct size for the current. That’s the reason for insisting that any lead or extension lead is uncoiled before it is used.
Thank you for such a thorough reply, again that's all very helpful info.

Just to clarify one thing, if the charger controls the rate automatically, does that mean it's fine just being left in the 'max charge' setting (in the car's settings) or would there be a benefit to knocking it down to the intermediate setting?
 

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Thank you for such a thorough reply, again that's all very helpful info.

Just to clarify one thing, if the charger controls the rate automatically, does that mean it's fine just being left in the 'max charge' setting (in the car's settings) or would there be a benefit to knocking it down to the intermediate setting?
Yes, you might as well set it to max charge. If you get to use a dedicated charger anytime, it will then charge at the full rate. If for some reason, eg you have to use a dodgy thin extension lead in an emergency, you can go back to the slow setting, but of course that will take 4 or 5 hours to charge.
 

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I've found that with the granny charger, even with the car charging rate set to Max, then the preconditioning (in December, but not yet very cold) drains the battery. Either because the preconditioning uses more power than it can pull through the granny charger, or (maybe) if it stops the charging while the preconditioning is running.
Would a charging post, allowing me to charge at the max 3.7kW, solve the problem and allow me to start the day with a defrosted car and a full battery?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I've found that with the granny charger, even with the car charging rate set to Max, then the preconditioning (in December, but not yet very cold) drains the battery. Either because the preconditioning uses more power than it can pull through the granny charger, or (maybe) if it stops the charging while the preconditioning is running.
Would a charging post, allowing me to charge at the max 3.7kW, solve the problem and allow me to start the day with a defrosted car and a full battery?
I'm not 100% sure as I don't use pre-conditioning very often, but from reading other threads recently I believe a fixed charger would solve this issue (you could run pre-conditioning whilst maintaining full charge when plugged in).
 

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Yes, you might as well set it to max charge. If you get to use a dedicated charger anytime, it will then charge at the full rate. If for some reason, eg you have to use a dodgy thin extension lead in an emergency, you can go back to the slow setting, but of course that will take 4 or 5 hours to charge.
I have now been using the intermediate setting for the last couple of days and it definitely seems to be charging more slowly than when it was set to max. Should there be any difference between those two settings when using the 3 pin charger?
 

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I have now been using the intermediate setting for the last couple of days and it definitely seems to be charging more slowly than when it was set to max. Should there be any difference between those two settings when using the 3 pin charger?
I don’t believe so, but there might be a slight difference. As far as I know, it should be 10 amps for intermediate, and the same rating for the granny charger. I have one of the plug type energy meters somewhere about, I could try it sometime. Could also be colder weather, perhaps.
 

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I've found that with the granny charger, even with the car charging rate set to Max, then the preconditioning (in December, but not yet very cold) drains the battery. Either because the preconditioning uses more power than it can pull through the granny charger, or (maybe) if it stops the charging while the preconditioning is running.
Would a charging post, allowing me to charge at the max 3.7kW, solve the problem and allow me to start the day with a defrosted car and a full battery?
Yes, it would. The car carries on charging or starts charging again during preconditioning, it’s just that the granny charger can’t quite keep up. Mind you, that shows that preconditioning does pull quite a hefty current in winter. I find 10 mins or so enough so far. May need a bit more we go seriously subzero, but not too much of that in the soft south:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
I don’t believe so, but there might be a slight difference. As far as I know, it should be 10 amps for intermediate, and the same rating for the granny charger. I have one of the plug type energy meters somewhere about, I could try it sometime. Could also be colder weather, perhaps.
Ok thanks. I think there must be a small difference as it definitely seems to charge more slowly in the reduced setting. It would be good to know for sure if you are able to test the difference. I've been amazed by how much of an effect the temperature makes to battery performance (even just a few degrees seems to significantly affect the range).
 

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I have now been using the intermediate setting for the last couple of days and it definitely seems to be charging more slowly than when it was set to max. Should there be any difference between those two settings when using the 3 pin charger?
On another forum a user said on the 3 pin connector, fast = 10A, intermediate = 8A and slow = 6A.
If the voltage is 230V (it can vary ~220-240) then this is 2.3kW, 1.84kW and 1.38kW. The car can take 16A from a charging post which is 3.68kW.
 

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Ok thanks. I think there must be a small difference as it definitely seems to charge more slowly in the reduced setting. It would be good to know for sure if you are able to test the difference. I've been amazed by how much of an effect the temperature makes to battery performance (even just a few degrees seems to significantly affect the range).
I had heard that preconditioning warms the battery and that in turn permits greater battery capacity, and better efficiency when you are using the battery
 

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I had heard that preconditioning warms the battery and that in turn permits greater battery capacity, and better efficiency when you are using the battery
You will notice when it get really cold you will have a startup message that says "Performance reduced whilst battery is conditioned" Preconditioning warms the battery and cabin so is more efficient overall and you don't waste range to do it if you are plugged in .
 

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Hi


Ok, first off, if you are using the granny charger plugged into a 13 amp socket you are at best only charging at the intermediate rate, about 10amps. Setting the charge rate to fast on the car doesn’t alter this, as the the charger automatically limits the charge rate.

The fast charge rate, which would bring your charge time down to about two hours is about 16 amps, which is over the rating of the plug fuse and the cable used. The only way to charge at that rate at home is to have a dedicated wall charger fitted. It’s well worth doing this if you can as there is a generous grant available, just contact any of the companies who offer wall chargers. It doesn’t have to be a bmw one, any suitable type 2 home charger will do.

You are talking, with the BMW, about the difference between 6 amp charging, 10 amp charging and 16amp charging. None of these really qualify as fast charging! More like quite slow, slow and very slow. There will be minimal difference in battery capacity

A good quality 13 amp rated extension lead will probably be OK. The car manufacturers advise against extension leads because they are the weakest link. There have been cases of people using any old extension cable which often aren’t proper 13 amp rated cable or which have substandard plugs and sockets. Just because a lead has a 13 amp plug on the end doesn’t mean it’s definitelt a 13 amp lead!

Also if you are plugging into a household plug on one of the house ring mains, you have to think what else is plugged in. Ring mains are designed to cope with average loads and are fused up to 32 amps, but if you had a couple of electric heaters plugged into other sockets on the same ring, you could be overloading the ring without realising it. So take care.

A continuous 10 amp current running for 3 hours is a serious electrical load, it will seek out any weak spot in the connections. Once a weakness is found, the dodgy contact or cable will start to overheat, ultimately it can melt the cable or even catch fire. The circuit breaker won’t help until the bare wires touch, which could be too late. The manufacturers of course bias their advice towards the safest advice, ie not to use extensions cables as they don’t want to be liable for your mistake!

As a stopgap or in an emergency until you have a proper charger, and with a good quality extension lead which is wired with cable that is genuinely rated at 13 amps can be used, but I’d suggest with caution and subject to the warnings above.

Any cable with an electric current running through it will start to warm up slightly, that’s just physics. Normall, this heat will just radiate into the air around. Leaving the cable in a coil means the heat can build up and damage or melt even a cable that is nominally the correct size for the current. That’s the reason for insisting that any lead or extension lead is uncoiled before it is used.
Has any one got an idea , which mode of bmw 330e woll be most economical, less fuel consumtion? I am confused should i put it on comfort or eco ? As i am a taxi driver. And also people says that petrol engine kicks in at 60mph speed but my car engine kicks in on 30 mph . Any one has any answer to these questions , plz help , i will be grateful
 

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Has any one got an idea , which mode of bmw 330e woll be most economical, less fuel consumtion? I am confused should i put it on comfort or eco ? As i am a taxi driver. And also people says that petrol engine kicks in at 60mph speed but my car engine kicks in on 30 mph . Any one has any answer to these questions , plz help , i will be grateful
Eco is most economical. The petrol engine kicks in under lots of circumstances including if you accelerate hard, use the manual gear controls or reach a certain speed (or the battery gets low). (74mph is max on battery but only if you put it onto Max electric mode). The battery is small so it generally tries to use it at the slowest speeds and flips to petrol when you need more power.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Eco is most economical. The petrol engine kicks in under lots of circumstances including if you accelerate hard, use the manual gear controls or reach a certain speed (or the battery gets low). (74mph is max on battery but only if you put it onto Max electric mode). The battery is small so it generally tries to use it at the slowest speeds and flips to petrol when you need more power.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Thnks , i wish it was like tesla
 
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