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Seems so, apparently Elon Musk gave the following quote during his "patent conference call", it's pretty interesting.

For high-speed charging in particular, I think that's a great area for commonality among manufacturers. In fact, the team from BMW was visiting Tesla last night. We talked about potential ways to collaborate, and one of them was on the Supercharging network. We're more than happy to have other manufacturers use our Supercharging network and / or to build superchargers and install them, and then maybe have some sort of cross-use agreement.
Now BMW's Kenn Sparks has confirmed it took place:

Both companies are strongly committed to the success of electro-mobility and discussed how to further strengthen the development of electro-mobility on an international level.
I can't tell if this is good, bad or indifferent. The reason I say this is two-fold.

Firstly I believe BMW are one of those who lobbied to get CCS recognised as "the" (or a) EU standard for car charging (as it's the horse they appear to be backing right now).

Secondly Tesla charge (quite a lot) up front for Supercharger access and BMW have their Chargemaster "Chargenow" tie-in. Is this the best model for car ownership, tied in to charge by the manufacturer of your vehicle? Even if a cross-standard/cross-platform network? Not sure.

Full story on The Verge: http://www.theverge.com/2014/6/12/5804890/bmw-confirms-that-it-met-with-tesla-this-week-to-talk-about-electric-cars
 

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CCS and CHAdeMO charge rates will be unacceptable for consumers in long range BEV. If BMW have a long range BEV in their future plans then I do not believe they'd risk saddling it with yesterdays charging technology.

SuperCharger technology is here today and adopting it gives BMW the opportunity to catch up with Tesla and tap into the long range BEV market that Tesla have created :)
 

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Just saw the same quote and was stunned but maybe it just goes to show that BMW are getting behind EVs. When they backed CCS that was the best out there now they may just want to ensure they could benefit from whatever superchargers Tesla is able to deliver.

I read about this on ArsTechnica

'Musk also added that Tesla wants to encourage a standard for high-speed charging, which could be used between EV manufacturers. He specifically noted that Tesla had been in talks with BMW about creating such a standard.'
 

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CCS and CHAdeMO charge rates will be unacceptable for consumers in long range BEV. If BMW have a long range BEV in their future plans then I do not believe they'd risk saddling it with yesterdays charging technology.

SuperCharger technology is here today and adopting it gives BMW the opportunity to catch up with Tesla and tap into the long range BEV market that Tesla have created :)
I'm not an engineer, so I'm sure someone who knows will chime in but...
...Is there a reason (in plain English please!) why CHAdeMO and CCS couldn't deliver higher charge rates than currently? (i.e. allowing the existing chargers to be upgraded while still allowing backward compatibility)
 

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...Is there a reason (in plain English please!) why CHAdeMO and CCS couldn't deliver higher charge rates than currently? (i.e. allowing the existing chargers to be upgraded while still allowing backward compatibility)
The CCS and CHAdeMO standards could reach higher power levels but Tesla are already deploying systems that outperform anything they have on paper let alone anything they can deploy in the next 5 to 10 years.

As an engineer Tesla's system is so much more advanced that I'd run with it because it gives the best customer experience (fast and reliable charging). I also think Teslas move on patents makes this easy. I think the really interesting question now is not when will someone use Tesla SuperCharger technology but who will be the first :)
 

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They could, but not as easily as the supercharger as it was designed to be modular 10kw blocks. I don't know what the limit of the SC connector is (US or Super Type 2)

All of the connectors have a limit of how much current they can handle. To make the connector bigger, add liquid or air cooling to it would need to redesign the whole connector.

Alternatively you can have multiple sockets but by the time that rolled out it will have just been superceeded by a newer connection.

I think we just have to accept an evolution of the capabilities of charging, the best thing is that the electricity is all the same so it is always possible (not necessarily cheap) to create a slower backwards compatible adapter. One day I am sure all the connectors will be replaced with wireless charging either stationary or in a charging lane/section of the motorway.

Imagine if all you need to do to a petrol ICE to allow diesel, LPG or H2 refuelling would be to use an adapter at the filling station.

The connector issue for EVs will be long forgotten within 5 to 10 years.
 

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Thanks @Kevin Sharpe and @Guesty
My thought process was wondering what would happen if, say, Nissan said "Sure, the next Leaf will support Tesla's supercharger". Where would that leave the exising CHAdeMO rapids? OK, they'd be good for a few years, but presumably Ecotricity et al would immediately stop any new deployments, meaning that - eventually - you have an outdated standard, and any existing owners see their charge network dwindle little by little as the suppliers decide they won't bother maintaining...
(Not that I expect to keep my Leaf that long, but one would expect they'd still be around).
 

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Thanks @Kevin Sharpe wondering what would happen if, say, Nissan said "Sure, the next Leaf will support Tesla's supercharger". Where would that leave the exising CHAdeMO rapids?
IMO CHAdeMO will eventually disappear and the EU have underlined that by saying they should not be funded after 2018.

We really are at the very beginning of the electric car transition and if it manages to survive I believe range and home/work charging will make en route charging very niche indeed.
 
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