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So while it's clear that the supercar makers are now fully on board with electrification, none of them have truly put their money where their mouths are and produced a "mid-range" electrified sports car. When the next round of sub-$250,000 sports cars comes out—from Lamborghini, McLaren, Porsche, and Ferrari—they absolutely need to be as competitive as the i8. The same is true of the cars below it, the Corvettes and Mustangs of the world. The bar has been set, and there's no bringing it back down.

http://www.popsci.com/bmws-i8-car-every-automaker-manufacturer-will-make
 

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I disagree. I believe all super car manufacturer should be aiming to follow and beat tesla model S p85d. Why go partial electric with only 15 miles of electrification. With the price of these super cars (£250k and above), a super car of a range of 250 miles (most super cars do not drive more that 250 miles a year, as they are being wrapped in cotton wool), they will sell within their niche market, while accelerating the adoption of EVs.

As much as everyone keeps praising the i8, i just think it is a waste of money and RnD time, it would have been a lot cheaper to go full electric than to build a hybrid drive train system.
 

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As much as everyone keeps praising the i8, i just think it is a waste of money and RnD time, it would have been a lot cheaper to go full electric than to build a hybrid drive train system.
BMW's order book may disagree on that front.

While it may be cheaper to go all electric there is more to this than cost, plus you have to remember the Model S and i8 are not really alike in many ways.
 

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I think that the i8 is a brilliant concept and gives supercar performance with a microcar thirst but it isn't a proper EV as I bet you could hardly get to the bottom of my road in the winter in pure EV mode.

The same can be said for virtually all the PHEV's currently on the market.
I drive an Ampera and along with many other owners try very hard never to use the ICE generator and it can be weeks before I dip into the gallon or so of petrol I keep in reserve.
The 25 to 45 mile range just about covers normal daily use but I note that virtually all other current PHEV's have less range or start the engine when accelerating which is surely not why they were built and typical archaic thinking by the manufacturers.

How is it that Tesla have triple or more energy storage in their cars and have had for years?

Imagine the Tesla cell pack and four wheel drive shoe horned into a carbon fibre Ferrari body, now that would be a supercar worthy of the name for this century rather than the old tech that seems so slow in dying out..
 
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They use massive batteries in low-volume cars that (in the case of the S and onwards) are designed around battery storage. I don't there's any voodoo being deployed.
Maybe but if I can install 32kWh of storage comfortably in my home built car using off the shelf cells, why is it that companies spending multiple millions on EV design can only to date install less than 24kWh in the most advanced models.

Old ICE mentality and more than a little encouragement from oil companies I wager.

It has been said many times but the first company to bring out a well priced 200 mile range EV will sweep the floor.
 
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A DIY car is nothing like a global series production vehicle. We all appreciate it's not what they can do, it's what they believe will serve them best now and in the medium term future.

Personally I wish they'd push full EV faster and harder, but I believe cars like the Outlander PHEV and BMW i8 are more than adequate gateway drugs to full BEV in the future, and clearly well appreciated vehicles in their own right.
 

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Old ICE mentality and more than a little encouragement from oil companies I wager.
I'll wager it has a lot more to do with hitting a price point than it has to do with conspiracy theories.
It has been said many times but the first company to bring out a well priced 200 mile range EV will sweep the floor.
Yeah, and the same about a 150 mile one, and a 300 mile one. Etc etc. I'll believe it when I see it.
 

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@Paul , the point I am making is that the Volt/Ampera were designed between 2006 and 2008 to be electric in the first instance and have more energy storage than any of the very newest PHEV's you mention which seem to be ICE priority with engine assisting the electric motor in most cases. To me just posher Prius's.

This to me is a backward step. I am no conspiracy theorist but the present crop of cars do not allay my fears of an ICE resurgence.

Just look at how many times these past few weeks the new Audi TT has been advertised. I am sick of seeing it.
 
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I was so disappointed when I found out that the i8 can only manage 60mpg at best.

It's a stunning looking thing & I expected much more. Doesn't really matter though; if I were to win huge on the lottery, I'd still buy a tesla P85 for a daily driver, and a Porsche 918 for fun :)
 

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I don't think they want to "sweep the floor" Russ, cost of battery is oft quoted as the barrier but if Renault can sell a Zoe for £9200 (presumably at a profit) and if you then add the battery value £7200 as per lease, it figures they could put in 3 batteries for a total cost of £30,800 giving 66KW power and still cost less than an i3.

Maybe but if I can install 32kWh of storage comfortably in my home built car using off the shelf cells, why is it that companies spending multiple millions on EV design can only to date install less than 24kWh in the most advanced models.

Old ICE mentality and more than a little encouragement from oil companies I wager.

It has been said many times but the first company to bring out a well priced 200 mile range EV will sweep the floor.
 

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I don't think they want to "sweep the floor" Russ, cost of battery is oft quoted as the barrier but if Renault can sell a Zoe for £9200 (presumably at a profit) and if you then add the battery value £7200 as per lease, it figures they could put in 3 batteries for a total cost of £30,800 giving 66KW power and still cost less than an i3.
And end up with a £30k Zoe. Um.
 

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I don't think they want to "sweep the floor" Russ, cost of battery is oft quoted as the barrier but if Renault can sell a Zoe for £9200 (presumably at a profit) and if you then add the battery value £7200 as per lease, it figures they could put in 3 batteries for a total cost of £30,800 giving 66KW power and still cost less than an i3.
My 32kWh cell pack cost £8000 before import duty nearly three years ago. Add up to £1000 for BMS etc and my purchasing power seems to be better than companies buying multiple thousands. The tin box and temperature control doesn't add much.
I don't think the real cost of battery packs is being admitted. These CALB etc cells are not proving to be much different in quality, especially if they were cosseted in the way that the Volt/Ampera's are.
 
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It is a shame that hybrid technology at this end of the market is being used to bring more performance to an ICE, rather than to bring more range to a BEV, like the i3.

I know CF is used in many supercars, but now BMW is going mainstream with it, I am waiting to see how they deal with cars that suffer chassis damage. AFAIK, even small cracks or splits in CF are difficult if not impossible to repair.
 

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I know CF is used in many supercars, but now BMW is going mainstream with it, I am waiting to see how they deal with cars that suffer chassis damage. AFAIK, even small cracks or splits in CF are difficult if not impossible to repair.
It has been written about quite a lot, here is a good one: http://www.bmwblog.com/2014/07/11/learn-bmw-i3-repair-process/

The i3 has been pretty cheap to insure, so presumably the insurance companies believe them on costs.
 
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