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Most small cars actually MUCH worse than my previous Mazda 6 was with a very large (2.5 litre, 141 kW) engine and high weight (2t) consumed considerably less than many smaller and lighter cars.
What? Do you have an example? That's not exactly an obvious statement and needs some clarifiaction. For example, Google says the Mazda 6 does 37-53 mpg combined and the Toyota Yaris does 58-67 combined. Your right foot must be considerably smaller and lighter than your left foot (assuming RHD) to be able to beat small cars in a much larger one.

Also, while I agree some politicians talk about reducing emissions when the measure will have only a small real-world impact, the real reason for cutting speed limits to 20mph is to reduce pedestrian (particularly children) injuries and fatalities, e.g. here:
Reducing the speed limit to 20 mph in urban areas
 

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...but you are still driving on the wrong side of the road and mixing units and so on.
I'm a believer of the metric system... if that helps :)

I lived in SA for five years a VERY long time ago. After arriving it took me a few days to adjust, but other than that, not an issue to drive on the wrong side of the road.
Ja boet.
 

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What? Do you have an example? That's not exactly an obvious statement and needs some clarifiaction. For example, Google says the Mazda 6 does 37-53 mpg combined and the Toyota Yaris does 58-67 combined. Your right foot must be considerably smaller and lighter than your left foot (assuming RHD) to be able to beat small cars in a much larger one.

Also, while I agree some politicians talk about reducing emissions when the measure will have only a small real-world impact, the real reason for cutting speed limits to 20mph is to reduce pedestrian (particularly children) injuries and fatalities, e.g. here:
Reducing the speed limit to 20 mph in urban areas
My example is NOT a Google example, it is called REAL life experience. I have always been very fuel conscious, but not overly light footed, in fact, after buying the much more powerful BMW 330e I have now, I have become more light footed. I am not saying that EVERY smaller car consumes more, but quite a few does. Though I am well aware that the specs says otherwise, but I am also well aware of the facts that those specs are fake, poorly tested and is ONLY for making you believe whatever you like, because they are always too optimistic, and many time illogical. For exaple, uphill you may need to lower the gear and increase the rev in a small car, while I could just continue in the highest gear and EXTREMELY small rev adjustment.

This optimism about consumption is true for EV, as well as for ICE cars, but the new tests are a bit better, though more realistic for some cars then others.

There is also no way of comparing two cars for real without the same driver driving the same route over a longer period. But of course, if you go to extremes you will find examples which prove me wrong, but not with very large margins. Also, please remember that most cars are MUCH older and not as well and professionally serviced as my cars have been, so compare a few years older and smaller cars with mine and you get considerably different figures. I had a smaller Mazda as well, a Mazda 3, in parallel, and that consumed almost exactly the same as my larger one, so you can say I have even parallel experience with cars from the same manufacturer. Even the latest Mazda 3 with what they call "Mild Hybrid"... whatever that means, has in my opinion too high consumption considering 5 years development. BTW, compare the new Mazda 3 with the Yaris, and you see that the Mazda 3, though it is larger, has a lower consumption at least according to the specs. So it really is not that simple, you can't just claim that a larger car consumes more fuel. ...and I wasn't even taking safety or comfort into consideration.

Another thing, just for fun I looked at the latest Yaris (not Google, but Toyota Sweden) and the figure they give is quite a bit different from yours... They show 47mpg (6l/100km mixed driving), so it is well within what you Googled about my previous Mazda, though my real consumption was a bit higher than that commuting to work (mixed but not high speed driving). Even on my last long trip between Sweden and Hungary, over the German motorways I had an average consumption of 36mpg, though DEFINITELY not light footed during that 4000km trip. I know for fact that smaller cars consume more on the same trip, since I have done that with both a Citroen C3 and a Mazda 3, as well as with smaller Volvo and some other cars. The Mazda 6 I had was my by far the largest car I ever had, but also the least consuming one. And here I am not talking about Google, but real life experience of the same driver doing the same trip several times.
 

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Yes, but we didn't know it better in 1973-1974... because actually, fuel consumption can substantially increase if you drop the speed. We had no onboard computers to show how it works, but everybody assumed that slower driving = lower consumption. This is wrong, except if you dramatically lower your speed or NOT have to change gear. A modern car not necessarily consumes more petrol at higher speed, which easily can be observed today. Quite the opposite, when they changed my local street from 50kmh to 40kmh I could see a dramatic INCREASE of my petrol consumption on that part compared to driving at 50kmh. That's because the gear needed to be lowered and the engine rev increased. This is of course not the case for EV without gear box, but can still be true for PHEV. At least it feels like it is true for my PHEV but I have not yet done any scientific experiment for my new car mainly because I don't really feel when it changes gear (which is actually a good thing).
I was referring to the U.K. fuel crisis in 2000, 10 days of fuel protests and empty petrol stations and roads!
 

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Driving on the right is historic. It comes from the days of chariots when a driver had to engage the enemy with a sword in the right hand. Then in sailing boats when they didn't have central rudders but had a 'steering board' strapped to the right-hand side. Which is where 'Starboard' came from. ( Portside being the boat side that wouldn't break off the steering board if you parked at a port ) Also easier for a right handed coachman to wield a pistol if approached by highwaymen.

Quite why it changed to lefties I don't know.
 

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I was referring to the U.K. fuel crisis in 2000, 10 days of fuel protests and empty petrol stations and roads!
I didn't know there was a "fuel crisis" in 2000. :)

Anyway, what I wrote about fuel consumption was true even 20 years ago.
 

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I didn't know there was a "fuel crisis" in 2000. :)

Anyway, what I wrote about fuel consumption was true even 20 years ago.
It was an interesting time, queues at some petrol stations that made even a rapid charge look quick.

The point was that as soon as people realised they couldn’t just get the next tank of fuel in a few minutes and from wherever they wanted, there was a change in their behaviour.

Generally speaking, most cars are far more fuel efficient at 80kmh than at 120kmh, and that was true even 20 years ago.
 

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Didn't parliament vote to transfer them into UK law? That's not exactly what I'd call removing...
True, but we can now "Take Back Control" (tm) by selectively repealing ones we don't like. I'm glad I don't work in Sunderland making Leafs for Nissan, I might be quite concerned for my job these days.
 

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That's not as long as I waited in a queue to get back into the UK through UK control, last time into Heathrow.

.. I never voted for that either ....
 

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Could it possibly be a mundane reason?

Quote from Schipol airport responding to Twitter comments: "New staff members were being trained yesterday, leading to longer queues at the passport control than usual."
 

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It's classic brexit. He just assumed everything would immediately get better and when it doesn't looks for someone to blame. And to cap it all off it has nothing to do with the EU or brexit at all.
 

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Generally speaking, most cars are far more fuel efficient at 80kmh than at 120kmh, and that was true even 20 years ago.
Yes, but only in the same gear. 120kmh at the highest gear (say sixth) can require equal or less fuel than 80kmh in lower (say fourth).
 

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ha... ha... 55 minutes was not uncommon for EU citizens arriving to Heathrow... I remember one time they split my family (forced us to stand in three different queues) to the automatic passport control, we passed through at different speeds (of course), my son's passport could not be read by the cameras, so he was sent away to manual control and not to the front, but to the back of that line, my wife and I was waiting... waiting... waiting... not knowing what happened to him, then one of the officials came to us and in a very rude manner told us that we are not allowed to wait there, we have to leave the area. We tried politely to explain that we were waiting for our son, but that didn't matter, even though we did NOT block for anyone. He was very rude, so we went outside his views. That time we waited over two hours before we could continue...

So don't whine about 55 minutes. It will be worse later on, but for us it will not make any difference, because Heathrow passport control has always been inefficient and slow and the officials have always been unfriendly and rude.
 

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I'm a believer of the metric system... if that helps :)

Ja boet.
127766


My first car. On the road between Joburg and Pretoria in 1976. Lekker. Car registration number is Klerksdorp, Transvaal but I lived in Johannesburg. I don't remember if it ever got a TJ plate or not.
 

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So don't whine about 55 minutes. It will be worse later on, but for us it will not make any difference, because Heathrow passport control has always been inefficient and slow and the officials have always been unfriendly and rude.
Coming back through Terminal 5 is incredibly slow too even for British people. Passport control is slow and the baggage reclaim is incredibly slow. I waiting 45 minutes just for bags last time, and that's after I went through immigration.

They are supposed to have a super duper state of the art baggage handling system but it's obviously pants.
 

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Passport control is ok for me most of the time, but the luggage delay is amazing. I remember coming from Madrid with the plane less than 50 yards from where the baggage lane was, yet waiting 45-50 minutes. I think they must have an automatic delay to make sure people don't start expecting too good service.

(brexit hasn't starting affecting travel between UK and EU yet, but facts can't come in the way of a good rant)
 
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