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Yes he is youtuber I follow.
Toyota have produced millions of parallel hybrids over the last two decades, never heard they have been battery supply constrained or that the extra drive-train is burdensome (the reason most state that range extenders are a wrong move)
Series hybrids have just one drive-train and battery size is completely flexible ranging from puffer (small) right the way through to huge (where you forgo the ice).
My take from the video is that there are still huge issues to overcome in the quest for electrification. Battery shortages no so much.
 

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No, you are wrong. I know Tesla, BMW and Nissan. They ALL use different rapid chargers.
No, I don't think I am a year behind on this, in fact I am pretty much up to date.
Nissan and Outlander are the only new cars sold in the UK with CHAdeMO. Tesla model S and X can charge on CCS with an adapter. Tesla Model 3 works on CCS. So do all other new EVs.

Nearly all rapids have both CCS and CHAdeMO.
 

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The hurdles that need to be overcome are our limited beliefs that we definitely need to travel regularly 1000km/day and that we must have very rapid charging etc. etc.

Look at Bjorn's 1000km stints in the live-stream, in the last hour of driving he's knackered and he only does it to stream it live, make a video and make a living. He literally makes a living out of driving regularly 1000km, and even he said he's gonna pause it because it's too much.

Regarding people's needs and beliefs in general, just remember that in 2006 you did not have the communication needs you have today. In 2006, there was no iPhone, no Android; no apps, no whatsapp, no app to start charging your EV (you had to use a webpage). Those are invented needs, same as people regularly needing to drive 1000km/day in a car; I'm now happily unemployed, but when I used to work... I don't know about you guys, but I used to drive to work about 230 days in the year. Weekends could cover 400km in a pretty unimpressive EV (22kWh Zoe). And vacation was either stop two days in places along a pre-determined route or just fly somewhere. Is life that different in other parts of the world?
 

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The energy density of petrol is very good as a carrying medium. If someone does invent a synthetic harmless when burned petrol would EVs still survive compared to the convenience of petrol? Maybe synthetic petrol will be what kills EVs off in 40 years....
EV is least awful option for now. Why folk are trolling up and down the motorways for pointless meetings is another question that needs addressing. Why are firms still sending people all over the place for a chat when skype exists?
Its not going to happen, everyone is focussed on CO2 whilst we are being poisoned, literally by NOx and similar.
Burn anything in an engine at the sort of temps they need to run at and its inescapable.
This isnt CO2 below you see ... and breathe ... and taste.
127664
 

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My take from the video is that there are still huge issues to overcome in the quest for electrification. Battery shortages no so much.
Just suppose in those early days back in the late 1800's BEVS had gained a stronger foothold and then some bright-spark had said 'why not use one of those newfangled internal combustion engines as an on board generator?', the idea then of developing a direct drive system from that engine would have seemed to be a fools errand.
100 hundred years later it seemed like a fools errand to ran anything other than a milk-float on battery power alone.
But this modern transition is first and foremost about replacing the ICE with an electric motor as the thing that turns the wheels. There are no huge issues to overcome in making that first fundamental step in the transition to us all driving electric one day.
There are only huge issues if you insist that the ICE and the existing supporting infrastructure has no part whatsoever play in that transition.
There were no huge issues when I got my Leaf in 2011, I just plugged it in on the drive and we still had the Mini. Now I drive a BMW i3 with rex and do all my day to day driving on electric and the rex does its job at other times. No issues, we are making progress, it is a transition.
 

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I'm not crazy, the attack has begun.
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Discussion Starter #169
Ooh, you’re such a bad boy.

I take it you also broke the laws of physics by averaging 80 mph while never exceeding 80?
Yes, officer. That is correct. But laws of physics aren't enforcible in UK law.

If it was to a physics person, I'd claim the Lorenz contraction. They may not buy it, but I would get a laugh.
 

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2032 it is certainly going to focus minds now and I really think we EV lovers should be of one voice in this transition period as to what is right way forward.
An EV is a vehicle that uses one or more electric motors as its sole means of propulsion.
What we want it to mean in the future is a vehicle that is only fuelled by electricity. But let's get the transition sensibly underway first, there is such a long way to go.
 

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Nissan and Outlander are the only new cars sold in the UK with CHAdeMO.
Before someone corrects me:

The LEVC Taxi has CHAdeMO and CCS connectors.
Renault Twizy uses a 3-pin plug to charge. There are 3rd party type-2 adapters.
 

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Yes, officer. That is correct. But laws of physics aren't enforcible in UK law.

If it was to a physics person, I'd claim the Lorenz contraction. They may not buy it, but I would get a laugh.
Did the officer that pulled you over say “‘ooo do ya think you are? Werner Heisenberg? Claiming uncertainty of your velocity because I’ve stopped you.”
 

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Of course, as long as different manufacturers use different type of batteries, located on different places, made in all kind of shapes, requiring special, brand specific devices to change batteries, using different connections... swapping makes no sense. That's where standardisation is needed, if swapping ever will be possible in large scale. Currently, even rapid chargers are slow compared to filling petrol, so even with the fastest chargers, swapping is what would be fastest if it would be possible. I accept that there are different capacity needs, and that results in different sizes, just like AAA, AA, C batteries, but I believe technically, this should be the easiest and fastest solution. Maybe not tomorrow and maybe not even in my life, but I believe it would be the best solution with current battery and charging types.


In transport industry it makes all the sense in the world to standardise. The more standardised the better it is for everyone in the long term. ...but you are still driving on the wrong side of the road and mixing units and so on. Never the less, at least 1 pound is 100 pence, so something did indeed changed during my life time. The rest will come in due time. :)
I think over a third [35%] of the cars in the world drive on the left so just maybe you are driving on the wrong side of the road?:eek: 100 years ago it was half and half, what surprised me was the map nearly all the world showed that they drove on the right but clearly they didnt have a lot of cars
 

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Yes, officer. That is correct. But laws of physics aren't enforcible in UK law.
A few years ago I spoke with a guy who was developing average speed cameras. He was both a tech nerd as well as a lip pursing law enforcement anorak. In his eyes anyone driving 0.1 mph over a limit should be put in chains and transported to the other side of the world.

He was actively working on a nationwide system that would link all average speed cameras to a central database and if someone was registered by one, say, in Manchester and then again seen in Bristol the puter would know the distance between those points and the time elapsed. If that was less than the max time available under speed limits for the shortest distance it would post a fine.

I made my excuses and left him to his sanctimonious musings.
 

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I'm not crazy, the attack has begun.
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Discussion Starter #175
A few years ago I spoke with a guy who was developing average speed cameras. He was both a tech nerd as well as a lip pursing law enforcement anorak. In his eyes anyone driving 0.1 mph over a limit should be put in chains and transported to the other side of the world.

He was actively working on a nationwide system that would link all average speed cameras to a central database and if someone was registered by one, say, in Manchester and then again seen in Bristol the puter would know the distance between those points and the time elapsed. If that was less than the max time available under speed limits for the shortest distance it would post a fine.

I made my excuses and left him to his sanctimonious musings.
Over a long distance, there could be an argument for that. The point is that you might be slowed at one point and are given latitude when it is quieter, this is working on the presumption that the motorways carry an expectation of 210 miles in 3 hours (say) given their speed limit.

I would go so far as to say that 'instantaneous speed' (those familiar with calculus will know the oxymoronic nature of that term!) should never be the subject of persecution by the law, the law should concern itself only with 'appropriate' speed and 'average' speeds over a given distance.

The whole issue of religiously applying speed limits as levels of punishment is silly if you give the users no chance to mechanically set their speeds. Until such time as speed limiter devices are mandated, it would be unreasonable to apply the law so definitely.

Many years ago as a young lad setting off in life and getting involved in things like the Institute of Advanced Motorists (realising only later that it's mostly a group of relatively sanctimonious drivers) I thought how silly it was having no speed limits in places like Germany. I visited the US and discovered there were no such things as 'driving dangerously' or 'carelessly', this has no place in US law; either you have complied with the traffic code or you have not. This 'arbitrary' interpretation thing we have in the UK is silly, because it tries to do both things, both simultaneously applying specific rules but then expecting people to also interpret them for 'safe' driving.

I soon realised that this was a fundamental problem in many ways, on the one had people 'interpret' certain laws and then say 'ah, THIS is the law', and it isn't. On the other, our roads are so badly kept, road junctions so poorly standardised, road markings so badly degraded [deliberately, to 'save money'] that this is quite different to the US. We have to drive 'interpretively', it makes no sense not to in the UK, you can't do otherwise.

So after some years I finally concluded that 'no speed limits' was actually the right thing for the UK. Simply have no speed limits. Simply oblige people to use their discretion to drive 'safely'. The only exception being where there is a pavement. Anywhere with a pavement should be 20mph. The reason is that a collision with a pedestrian is much more survivable at 20mph than anything faster. It should not be a death sentence to a person if they stumble off the pavement in front of you.

So that's my solution to speed limits. Have none, except 20mph wherever there is a pavement. If you treat people like children and impose rules, they will behave like children. Some will anyway, but responsible people will read the road and select an appropriate speed.

There may be occasions where a different speed limit is imposed, such as the approach to a difficult junction. If you lived in a country with no speed limits at all then saw a sign for 40mph, you'd take that seriously, wouldn't you?

I fear I have just taken my own thread way of topic there. I suppose to bring it back to the subject matter, what happened after these realisations was that I didn't worry about speed limits after that, I just ignored them if it was safe to do so. The change came as I got older. I realised I wasn't getting anywhere faster. So I just slowed down. This 'change of mind' that people need to take on, so as to enable the transition to EVs, needs to cross some of these psychological issues. It was once described to me like this by a psychologist person; those apt to drive fast feel like life is slowing them down, they have to get everywhere quicker, and anyone in their way is a block on their life, slowing them down. It's got very little to do with getting to a destination faster, it is just the psychology of getting on in life, itself, too slowly. After a bit of growing up, you realise trying to get somewhere quickly (both literally and metaphysically) is unprofitable, your efforts are better placed improving your immediate sphere of influence and progress positively in appropriate directions.

We probably need to get this across to a new breed of driver, so they don't feel bad about driving along at 60mph on the motorway, so EVs stand a chance of covering the distance/meeting expectations. Not sure that will be an easy sell.
 

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10 years ago we barely had any solar, little onshore wind and no offshore wind in the UK. Today we have 13GWp of solar, 13GWp of onshore wind and 8.5GWp of offshore wind. Sometimes, renewable energy meets over 50% of our electricity needs. We rarely use any coal on the grid. Much can happen in 10 years......
 

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I'm not crazy, the attack has begun.
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Discussion Starter #179
I think you are mistaken - although it varies state to state:

OK, well that told me! To be fair to me, it was California, and I note it refers only to 'wet reckless' and 'reckless involving alcohol', so the person relaying that to me was probably technically correct and I was wrong to generalise to US-wide.

Still, I think the US would be a tough place to run a prosecution for reckless if the driver had otherwise stuck to all traffic codes, because, in the US way of cascading liabilities, that would tend to implicate someone who has created the code or [failed to] implement street markings and furniture.
 

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OK, well that told me! To be fair to me, it was California, and I note it refers only to 'wet reckless' and 'reckless involving alcohol', so the person relaying that to me was probably technically correct and I was wrong to generalise to US-wide.

Still, I think the US would be a tough place to run a prosecution for reckless if the driver had otherwise stuck to all traffic codes, because, in the US way of cascading liabilities, that would tend to implicate someone who has created the code or [failed to] implement street markings and furniture.
State troopers will pull you over for ‘accelerating a bit quick’ or not fully stopping at a four way stop. Easy way for them to make their targets.

Although oddly while driving through Alabama one dark night with temporary out of state plates, the State Trooper let us go on our way because we were all British (and in his mind a bit simple).
 
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