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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Never saw this picture or some (pict/speaker "details") of the info before and thought I'd share.
Larger picture link -> http://www.boston.com/business/ticker/2 ... ration.JPG


http://www.boston.com/business/ticker/2011/01/chevy_volts_can.html


In all the hoopla surrounding the new Chevrolet Volt not many people have discussed the type of entertainment system in the vehicle. As you might expect, you can't have the usual in an unusual car. The Bose Energy Efficient Series sound system uses a proprietary design and exclusive Bose technologies. The new sound system delivers premium high-quality audio, but is 30% smaller, 40% lighter and uses 50% less energy than automotive sound systems with comparable performance.

Bose High Efficiency Technology
The Bose Energy Efficient Series sound system features Bose switching amplification, High Motor Force speakers and proprietary control circuitry to reproduce sound at concert hall volumes, while reducing its power consumption by half. The Bose amplifier runs cooler than conventional linear amplifiers, and uses a smaller, lighter heat sink, significantly reducing its size and weight. Using exclusive control circuitry and switching technology, its energy consumption is dramatically reduced, yet it delivers eight channels of custom equalization to power the speakers: three High Motor Force woofers, one located in each front door and one integrated in the spare-tire well, two 1-inch tweeters integrated in the A-pillar; and two 4-inch neodymium mid/high-range speakers, placed in the rear doors.

Using select materials and custom design, the system delivers the performance of larger, heavier speakers. Drivers and passengers will hear musical detail throughout the frequency range, including the deep low notes required to reproduce lifelike audio.

The Bose Energy Efficient Series system comes standard on the 2011 Chevrolet Volt [and is an option on the 2012 as some folks didn't want it].

For more information visit
Bose <--click me. Check out the two videos there with these graphics.
See at click me above.
.
 

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Re: Bose Sound - 30% smaller, 40% lighter and uses 50% les

Some people say, 'I hear no highs, I feel no lows, it sounds like ****, it must be Bose'...
 

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Re: Bose Sound - 30% smaller, 40% lighter and uses 50% les

It has not been a favourite of mine I must say. In home cinema circles it is at or near the bottom of the ladder!

EDIT: I said it was a favourite when I meant it has NOT!!!
 

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Re: Bose Sound - 30% smaller, 40% lighter and uses 50% les

Is it just me or does anyone else think the Balance/fade adjustment is all arse about face?
When looking at the diagram I assumed the crosshair was the equibalance point, so to bring the rear speaker volume up abit I would move the crosshair forward in the cabin... But nope that does the opposite. to raise the rear volume I move the crosshair closer to the rear...
It just does not seem logical to me. the greater the distance between the speaker and crosshair the greater the sound should travel ie Louder. It currently works so that the smaller the distance the louder it is.

Anyone else think this is wrong or is it just me?
 

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Re: Bose Sound - 30% smaller, 40% lighter and uses 50% les

Sorry but I assumed the opposite!!! :roll:

I assumed that the cross hairs showed the bias... i.e. to increase the rear volume I move the hairs back.

I can see that it could be taken either way. They had to pick one way so I suppose and that is it ;)
 

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Re: Bose Sound - 30% smaller, 40% lighter and uses 50% les

Yes there's always the problem of which way round to do it. I think that Many others do it as the equibalance point, I think my merc did, and my computers sound system does too.
It would have been nice to have been able to put the crosshair on the drivers seat and to experience full surround at that point in the vehicle, whereas now I have to find some arbitrary point in the rear passenger side in order to experience full surround sound at the drivers seat :(

P.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Re: Bose Sound - 30% smaller, 40% lighter and uses 50% les

Sure if you had no limits you can do/get what you want but don't forget one of the main points:
30% smaller, 40% lighter and uses 50% less energy

I spent two years building a dedicated home theater in my house. I'm pretty happy with the sound in my Volt overall. Too much bass at high volumes but nice they have 3 "subs" which is not easy because of wave cancellations and multiple sweet spots in a car (ie. 2 or 4 if you carry rear passengers). Default higher bass seems to work well for most peoples low volume usage.
 

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Vauxhall Mokka e Launch Edition May 2021 (nee Ampera Electron May 2012)
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Re: Bose Sound - 30% smaller, 40% lighter & uses 50% less en

Please, is there any way we can have a "Too technical for Mike" warning on some posts?

I have a first born to do the fiddly things and I am just glad to be able to get DAB Radio 7 (refuse to use the latest designation).

Am I alone in being both addicted to this site and somewhat confused by some postings?

Mike
 

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Re: Bose Sound - 30% smaller, 40% lighter & uses 50% less en

Sorry if some of the chat is confusing you. I suppose this can happen when a bunch of keen enthusiasts get together. I am sure no one likes the idea of others not understanding what we are saying.

Can I suggest 2 things:

If anyone doesn't understand something that is said please - just ask. I am sure the original poster will explain or someone else will.

If anyone posts any techie stuff please remember that not everyone reading will understand. Sometimes a simple explanation can often make things easier for people to follow what we are saying.

I must practice what I preach !!!
 

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Re: Bose Sound - 30% smaller, 40% lighter & uses 50% less en

With 7 speakers for the amplifier to drive (how does it compare to a std. Ampera?) what load does the sound system put on the battery ?
 

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Re: Bose Sound - 30% smaller, 40% lighter & uses 50% less en

Very little load on the traction battery as it is 12V and is powered by the 12V battery.

This is true for most, if not all, of the 12V systems such as lights, radio, etc.
 

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Re: Bose Sound - 30% smaller, 40% lighter & uses 50% less en

Voltage isn't the issue, it's the ampage. Back in the day, I had a professional install in a Peugeot 205.. I thought I was so cool (everyone else undoubtedly thought I was an idiot) and the headlamps would dim everytime the subwoofer in the parcelshelf kicked in.. if the engine wasn't running the battery would have been dead in minutes. OK, so that's an extreme example, but sound systems, particuarly those that are supposed to be "high end" put a load on the battery.
 

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Re: Bose Sound - 30% smaller, 40% lighter & uses 50% less en

Voltage is the issue (and not current) on the Ampera because before you can assess impact you have to determine where the power is coming from... either the 12V battery or the traction battery.

If from the traction battery, as with A/C or heating, it will directly have an effect on range.

If the voltage is 12V then it will be powered by the 12V battery and range is not directly affected unless the 12V battery is depleated when it is then charged from the traction battery otherwise it is charged when it is plugged in or from the generator.

May be that the current is so high that the 12V battery can't provide enough power in which case the traction battery would then have to top up the 12V battery and range would then be affected a bit.
 

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Re: Bose Sound - 30% smaller, 40% lighter & uses 50% less en

Paul Churchley said:
May be that the current is so high that the 12V battery can't provide enough power in which case the traction battery would then have to top up the 12V battery and range would then be affected a bit.
Since car audio is pretty much universally 12V, it's the difference in ampage between the Electron and Positiv sound systems that will determine the difference in power ( volts x amps ) consumed ( initially from the 12v battery )

Given you say that the traction battery would top up the 12V battery, there is the possibility that the Electron could have a shorter range than the Positiv.
 

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Re: Bose Sound - 30% smaller, 40% lighter & uses 50% less en

The low voltage (12V) battery is charged using the 'accessory power module' which steps down the high voltage - there is no separate 12V generator. See http://www.bhs.is/bilar/orka/Chevy%20Volt.pdf (which I found interesting)

As for the sound systems between models making a difference to range, I thought that the idea of Bose energy efficient model was to use similar power to the standard system. Even if there are a few watts difference in consumption, it isn't going to make much difference to the 10.6 kWH we typically have available...
 

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Re: Bose Sound - 30% smaller, 40% lighter & uses 50% less en

exiges said:
Paul Churchley said:
May be that the current is so high that the 12V battery can't provide enough power in which case the traction battery would then have to top up the 12V battery and range would then be affected a bit.
Since car audio is pretty much universally 12V, it's the difference in ampage between the Electron and Positiv sound systems that will determine the difference in power ( volts x amps ) consumed ( initially from the 12v battery )

Given you say that the traction battery would top up the 12V battery, there is the possibility that the Electron could have a shorter range than the Positiv.
No, I think that you misunderstand my post.

If the Ampera is similar to the Leaf then the 12V battery is only charged from the high-voltage battery when it reaches a low level. This is to stop the 12V battery being a constant drain on the traction battery thereby always reducing range. Instead, the 12V battery is only every charged from the traction battery if it gets discharged to a low level. Otherwise it is charged when plugged in.

That means that lights, radio etc, in fact, any 12V item, will never normally affect range unless the 12V battery gets low.

That is why the current is not all that relevent unless a high current results in a low 12V battery level.

So, if this is the same in the Ampera, even if the radios are of very different power they will neither affect range unless the 12V battery gets low.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Re: Bose Sound - 30% smaller, 40% lighter & uses 50% less en

Paul Churchley said:
If the Ampera is similar to the Leaf then the 12V battery is only charged from the high-voltage battery when it reaches a low level. This is to stop the 12V battery being a constant drain on the traction battery thereby always reducing range. Instead, the 12V battery is only every charged from the traction battery if it gets discharged to a low level. Otherwise it is charged when plugged in.<snip>
So, if this is the same in the Ampera, even if the radios are of very different power they will neither affect range unless the 12V battery gets low.
I think the APM is working just like an alternator in your normal ICE car and keeps the 12v battery charges "constantly". I use a OBDII connected scangauge device on my Volt and one of the things it displays is the voltage. When my car is on it often is showing 14.2-14.4v. When I turn off but it is charging it shows 13.0-13.2v. I just did this a minute ago. I think when the car is not actively charging and I turn the car off (before opening the door) it shows about 12.2v.

Just a minute ago while the car was on, I was cranking up the system about as loud as it would go playing rock and did not notice the voltage on my scangauge move as I played with the volume.

From a summary post on gm-volt.com
In the Volt, the 12 Volt battery's voltage is maintained by the "accessory power module" (APM) when the Volt is "on", and maintained by hte main battery charger assembly when the Volt is plugged in. The APM is a DC to DC converter that takes high voltage (360v) from the Volt's traction battery and converts it to ~13.0-15.5 Volts in order to maintain the low voltage accessory loads (including the Volt's computers and modules). It also charges the 12V system's battery, also know as an "absorbant glass mat" (AGM) battery. The 12V battery's voltage is maintained when the car is running or charging (by the APM or charger, respectively), but not when parked and unplugged.
Aside: The AGM type is for safety. In the event of a crash I think it is safer.
 

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Re: Bose Sound - 30% smaller, 40% lighter & uses 50% less en

Excellent. Thanks for that Scott.

So it certainly looks different from the system on the Leaf and that might be because the Leaf is 100% electric and doesn't have the option of using an onboard generator so maintaining traction power is more important.

I am still curious though as to just how much items like the radio an affect electric range. Surely it can't be much? Similarly with headlights?
 

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Re: Bose Sound - 30% smaller, 40% lighter & uses 50% less en

Total headlight load is about 100W, so if you were driving at 50mph and getting a 50 mile range, this would be 0.1 kWh or 0.47 miles off the total range. At 70mph and 35 miles range, it would use 0.05 kWh or 0.17 miles off the total.

I don't know, but I'd imagine the radio would take about the same power.
 
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