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Hi all,

I'm new on here, so thanks in advance for any advice.

Last week, I bought a Nov 2016 i3 with 18k on the clock. Its a 94ah REX version - leather, large screen and turbine alloys, and with park assist - so a fair few extras. Bought from BMW used approved (UK) - so with the usual 12 m warranty etc.

Anyway, its a great car so far, drives perfectly. But have been very concerned after reading quite a few posts on various forums about the endless problems some of these cars have including the drivetrain issues. I know I'm 'safe' for the next 12 months, but what do I do after that? I heard the extended warranties from BMW don't come cheap.

Any advice on what to do once the 12 months are up? Do third party warranties cover the main components that become faulty? Anyway, I would be happy to sell-up in a year if things become tricky, and go back to ICE if necessary (which would be a shame!).

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Wow, that's makes me worry even more.

At this rate, I'll be flogging this car once the warranty is nearly ending...
Thanks
 

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Wow, that's makes me worry even more.

At this rate, I'll be flogging this car once the warranty is nearly ending...
Thanks

I posted that an i3 REx has just been sold in the States with mileage in excess of 140K. Bearing in mind that there are now many thousands of i3s on the roads around the World there are very few reports of major issues. Yes, BMW Insured Warranties are expensive - and not just for the i3. I offset the £800 or so that I paid on my old i3 against depreciation on a new i3 and, despite there being one or two grey areas about what is and what isn't covered under an insured warranty, I have not seen a single report that BMW's insurer has refused to pay for a repair. Without an insured warranty, even the cost of diagnostic tests can be high.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I guess the other problem is, non BMW garages wouldn't not know how to rectify some of the issues.. making BMW quids in

Maybe I'll just take the risk, and keep some money aside!

If I maintain a full BMW dealership service history, is it likely that BMW(UK) would pay for (at least part) for any major repairs if they were needed - out of goodwill?

Thanks
 

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The drivetrain issue is suffered by the early 60Ah Rex model built up until the middle of 2016.

Happy to be corrected on this, but as far as I know there hasn’t been a similar drivetrain error reported here by a 94Ah Rex owner.

My wife had one of the very first batch of 94 Rex that arrived in August 2016. Did 43k miles over 3 years before we sold it in August this year.
Replaced it with a 2019 i3S 94 Rex.

All that said, I wouldn’t want to own any EV without a manufacturer backed warranty in place. The tech’s still too new and not enough time has passed since their inception to know what may occur so too much of a risk in my opinion.

We sold the previous i3 before the warranty expired for this reason. The 94 Rexs hold their value extremely well after the initial drop from new. At the end of the initial two year lease, I bought it from BMW for £19,500, and sold it 12 months later with 13k more miles on it for the same £19,500. Given the level of enquiries, I could have asked for more. So better value to sell it than buy an extended warranty.

Depending what you paid and what it’s worth next year, you might find the same path works for you.

The 94 Rex still holds its value because on top of its decent battery range, the petrol generator in the back gives it far greater flexibility than even the current 120Ah, making it economically attractive to those doing more miles and those new to EVs who worry they might “catch” range anxiety.

The i3 will always have a market because although the boot’s not huge, in practice it’s big enough day to day and makes way for a class-leading enormous amount of cabin space.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The drivetrain issue is suffered by the early 60Ah Rex model built up until the middle of 2016.

Happy to be corrected on this, but as far as I know there hasn’t been a similar drivetrain error reported here by a 94Ah Rex owner.

My wife had one of the very first batch of 94 Rex that arrived in August 2016. Did 43k miles over 3 years before we sold it in August this year.
Replaced it with a 2019 i3S 94 Rex.

All that said, I wouldn’t want to own any EV without a manufacturer backed warranty in place. The tech’s still too new and not enough time has passed since their inception to know what may occur so too much of a risk in my opinion.

We sold the previous i3 before the warranty expired for this reason. The 94 Rexs hold their value extremely well after the initial drop from new. At the end of the initial two year lease, I bought it from BMW for £19,500, and sold it 12 months later with 13k more miles on it for the same £19,500. Given the level of enquiries, I could have asked for more. So better value to sell it than buy an extended warranty.

Depending what you paid and what it’s worth next year, you might find the same path works for you.

The 94 Rex still holds its value because on top of its decent battery range, the petrol generator in the back gives it far greater flexibility than even the current 120Ah, making it economically attractive to those doing more miles and those new to EVs who worry they might “catch” range anxiety.

The i3 will always have a market because although the boot’s not huge, in practice it’s big enough day to day and makes way for a class-leading enormous amount of cabin space.
Thanks for that. Really useful and to a certain degree reassuring. Although I'm just dreading the day when (if) a fault arises...

I will probably see how the year goes - any faults, niggles, repairs etc and then make a decision close to the end as to whether it's all worth the headache...

If absolutely no problems, it will be a dilemma of whether to take a risk or buy extended warranty. Seems like it would be a risky option not to have warranty though.

I paid around the same price for it. Do you think I would still get that amount in a year? Did you sell it privately or p/ex?

The problem is, I don't know what else to go for!! EV suits me as I get free charging at work. I guess I didn't think about the associated costs, potentially making it a false economy.

Any ideas how much an extended warranty will cost once this year is up? I guess anything up to £800 would be probably worth going for, even after considering the depreciation... I'm saving around £2k on fuel each year!!

Thanks
 

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Bought i3 REX - advice [sought]
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Sell i3 REX - advice [given]
 

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Basically, this post is a case of worrying about the unknown unknowns. A comprehensive diagnostic i3 via OBD2 access is a must have and will enable any tech savvy owner to monitor and maintain the car including performing tasks such as replacing the 12v battery.
 

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Basically, this post is a case of worrying about the unknown unknowns. A comprehensive diagnostic i3 via OBD2 access is a must have and will enable any tech savvy owner to monitor and maintain the car including performing tasks such as replacing the 12v battery.
That’s a bit of a teaser for us practical types who, nevertheless, have not been initiated into the mysteries of the OBD2 interface. Pray tell! What unit to buy, where to get the codes and what useful information can be retrieved? A new post perhaps?
 

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Thanks for that. Really useful and to a certain degree reassuring. Although I'm just dreading the day when (if) a fault arises...

I will probably see how the year goes - any faults, niggles, repairs etc and then make a decision close to the end as to whether it's all worth the headache...

If absolutely no problems, it will be a dilemma of whether to take a risk or buy extended warranty. Seems like it would be a risky option not to have warranty though.

I paid around the same price for it. Do you think I would still get that amount in a year? Did you sell it privately or p/ex?

The problem is, I don't know what else to go for!! EV suits me as I get free charging at work. I guess I didn't think about the associated costs, potentially making it a false economy.

Any ideas how much an extended warranty will cost once this year is up? I guess anything up to £800 would be probably worth going for, even after considering the depreciation... I'm saving around £2k on fuel each year!!

Thanks
I honestly wouldn’t worry about it. We’re not. It’s only the old 60Ah ones that were affected.

Sold ours privately. Difficult to say what the depreciation will be in the next 12 months, but given prices still haven’t shifted 3 months later, I think worst case you’ll less than you would with any ICE car.

I can’t remember how much the warranty was. Didn’t pursue it as it was better value to sell it and buy the S.

Never had any issues with our last one or indeed the current one at all. I’d honestly just enjoy it and the huge savings compared to burning petrol or diesel.
 

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Here's my twisted logic ....

Sell it next year and buy a Long Range model 3, save £720 on warranty, £1,200 on car hire, flights vs driving down to annual holiday (better for your carbon footprint and just not practical in an i3 really), lose a shed load on depreciation vs the i3 but pretend that didn't happen :rolleyes:
 

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EGGY
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As an aside on values, I paid £26,250 in Dec 17 for a 14 month old i3 rex (see signature) with 6k miles on it. It's now got 22.5k miles on it and Arnold Clark and Tesla (BCA auction price) value it at £15.5k. I've just sold my 2014 Cayman GTS for £51k, bought it for £61k 4 years ago .... and the warranty was cheaper that the i3 .... this bloody tree hugging malarky is expensive !
 

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As an aside on values, I paid £26,250 in Dec 17 for a 14 month old i3 rex (see signature) with 6k miles on it. It's now got 22.5k miles on it and Arnold Clark and Tesla (BCA auction price) value it at £15.5k. I've just sold my 2014 Cayman GTS for £51k, bought it for £61k 4 years ago .... and the warranty was cheaper that the i3 .... this bloody tree hugging malarky is expensive !
Your Cayman's one of a few exceptions rather then the rule I think. That said, £15.5k for your 94 Rex is a bit spiteful. Our August 16 94 Rex had 42k miles on it and I took £19,500 back for it in a private sale very, very easily.

Re your previous post - The plan is to chop the wife's S for a Model 3, probably early in the New Year, but she's got a test drive booked in a couple of weeks, so could be earlier (cough).
 

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Discussion Starter #15
In reply to a previous entry, I've just come across drivetrain faults online - it's all over the internet in fact. That's what worried me about this i3, and whether this would be an expensive issue. Not exacty sure if it includes a wide host of problems or if drivetrain errors mean a specific fault.

So am I right in thinking if I maintain a main dealer service history and something went majorly wrong despite relevative low miles, I'd have a good chance of BMW coughing up for it?

Any ideas how much an end of year 4 service costs (UK) and what it includes? Can't really find much detail about it online.

Thanks in advance.
 

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In reply to a previous entry, I've just come across drivetrain faults online - it's all over the internet in fact. That's what worried me about this i3, and whether this would be an expensive issue. Not exacty sure if it includes a wide host of problems or if drivetrain errors mean a specific fault.

So am I right in thinking if I maintain a main dealer service history and something went majorly wrong despite relevative low miles, I'd have a good chance of BMW coughing up for it?

Any ideas how much an end of year 4 service costs (UK) and what it includes? Can't really find much detail about it online.

Thanks in advance.
If you have an insured warranty, then the Drivetrain should be covered. The term Drivetrain covers a multitude of components. For example, I have just had an electric motor electrics (EME) module replaced under a BMW recall for I3s built between Dec 2018 and March 2019. If I had paid for the module change, then I suspect it would have cost me many £000s. Something as simple as a failed 12 volt battery could also result in a drivetrain failure.

I am not sure that low miles is good for any car nor is it likely to persuade BMW to dip into its pockets.
That said, BMW does make some goodwill payments. For example, I had a clutch replaced on a 3 series at BMW’s expense after 40 months; however, I had reported some clutch slip during the warranty period.
 

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In reply to a previous entry, I've just come across drivetrain faults online - it's all over the internet in fact. That's what worried me about this i3, and whether this would be an expensive issue. Not exacty sure if it includes a wide host of problems or if drivetrain errors mean a specific fault.

So am I right in thinking if I maintain a main dealer service history and something went majorly wrong despite relevative low miles, I'd have a good chance of BMW coughing up for it?

Any ideas how much an end of year 4 service costs (UK) and what it includes? Can't really find much detail about it online.

Thanks in advance.
My 2016 i3 REx (bought a year ago) is due a four year service in Aug 2020. Last quote I had was £375. It is a diagnostic dump and vehicle history back to BMW UK servers, along with a oil and filter change on the REx. Fluids are checked but an actual change of brake fluid would I think be extra. 12 v battery gets checked. Full service history is digitally stored on the car

Be aware the 12m used sales warranty is not as comprehensive as the original manufacture 3 year coverage, despite both coming from BMW. Therefore get the free end of warranty check done in good time under the manufacturer's three warranty. Rattles and extra noise can be investigated under the three year warranty but not under the 12m used car warranty.

A very common problem with the i3 is that the front rubber gaiters over the dampers split. The original rubber is not strong enough to cope with the lateral movement that is induced by UK pothole strewn roads. It is three hours labour to replace. Outside the warranty that will be ca. £600 at a main dealer just for labour. I managed to get mine done under the 12m warranty but the dealer would not admit it is a common problem. Basically the dealer will do a repair f.o.c. if they know that BMW will reimburse them. The replacement gaiters are stronger and the problem does not repeat.

Another common issue is a rattle from the lid of the glove box, it is easily fixed.

Apart from this my i3 has been faultless from year 2 to year 3 so I am now running for the 4th year without a warranty. With a repair roughly equal to the cost of changing the car, at the end of year 4 I will decide if I am keeping the car longer or trading it in. The car had no repairs recorded on it for its first two years of life, something I very carefully checked before making an offer on the car.

Bear in mind while it is more complex (so more repair risk) than the 120Ah the i3 94Ah REx has more range and is more flexible being dual fuel. Also if the 94Ah REx is pre-April 2017 then the VED is zero and there is no luxury car duty if the original list price was over £40k as a result of being loaded with options.

Depreciation slows down markedly once the car is worth less than £20k, so one can use the slower deprecation as an offset if one is unfortunate enough to need a major repair.

No need to take it to an expensive main agent if a repair is just mechanical like discs and pads. A good local garage will do that for about one third the labour cost. Oil and filter change is simple enough to do. BMW have a special tool to change the oil filter otherwise it is difficult to get at. Local garage won't be able to log details on the in-car digital service history.

A friend has a 2015 60Ah REx from new. The only repair it has needed has been the gaiters done under warranty. He is keeping it and running it on and does not have any extended warranty either. He uses the REx a lot and has had no issue with the ICE.

Hope this helps,
 

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A friend has a 2015 60Ah REx from new. The only repair it has needed has been the gaiters done under warranty. He is keeping it and running it on and does not have any extended warranty either. He uses the REx a lot and has had no issue with the ICE.
A common failure on the 2015 REx and i8s was a corroded fuel sensor resulting in a locked fuel flap. Mine failed at 2 years; 51 weeks and a day. It took me 3 days to find a dealer that would look at the fault so I was just within the warranty period. Year 4 (insured) was fault free.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
My 2016 i3 REx (bought a year ago) is due a four year service in Aug 2020. Last quote I had was £375. It is a diagnostic dump and vehicle history back to BMW UK servers, along with a oil and filter change on the REx. Fluids are checked but an actual change of brake fluid would I think be extra. 12 v battery gets checked. Full service history is digitally stored on the car

Be aware the 12m used sales warranty is not as comprehensive as the original manufacture 3 year coverage, despite both coming from BMW. Therefore get the free end of warranty check done in good time under the manufacturer's three warranty. Rattles and extra noise can be investigated under the three year warranty but not under the 12m used car warranty.

A very common problem with the i3 is that the front rubber gaiters over the dampers split. The original rubber is not strong enough to cope with the lateral movement that is induced by UK pothole strewn roads. It is three hours labour to replace. Outside the warranty that will be ca. £600 at a main dealer just for labour. I managed to get mine done under the 12m warranty but the dealer would not admit it is a common problem. Basically the dealer will do a repair f.o.c. if they know that BMW will reimburse them. The replacement gaiters are stronger and the problem does not repeat.

Another common issue is a rattle from the lid of the glove box, it is easily fixed.

Apart from this my i3 has been faultless from year 2 to year 3 so I am now running for the 4th year without a warranty. With a repair roughly equal to the cost of changing the car, at the end of year 4 I will decide if I am keeping the car longer or trading it in. The car had no repairs recorded on it for its first two years of life, something I very carefully checked before making an offer on the car.

Bear in mind while it is more complex (so more repair risk) than the 120Ah the i3 94Ah REx has more range and is more flexible being dual fuel. Also if the 94Ah REx is pre-April 2017 then the VED is zero and there is no luxury car duty if the original list price was over £40k as a result of being loaded with options.

Depreciation slows down markedly once the car is worth less than £20k, so one can use the slower deprecation as an offset if one is unfortunate enough to need a major repair.

No need to take it to an expensive main agent if a repair is just mechanical like discs and pads. A good local garage will do that for about one third the labour cost. Oil and filter change is simple enough to do. BMW have a special tool to change the oil filter otherwise it is difficult to get at. Local garage won't be able to log details on the in-car digital service history.

A friend has a 2015 60Ah REx from new. The only repair it has needed has been the gaiters done under warranty. He is keeping it and running it on and does not have any extended warranty either. He uses the REx a lot and has had no issue with the ICE.

Hope this helps,
Thanks that's extremely helpful. I've not had issues so far, but will no doubt be putting the car (and REX) through its paces over the cold winter and see if any faults comes about.

Yes, it was pre-2017 - I looked for one like this inentionally to avoid the extra taxes!!

£375 still seems like a lot for servicing. Do you know if there are any independent companies that would touch an i3?

Another question - is the service interval 24 months? Mine was serviced Nov 2018, and on the panel it states next service due Nov 2020, but I thought they need annual servicing? The dealer told me 24m was correct and no service would be required proper to them selling it to me.

I'm just trying to plan things in advance and have some contingency ideas ready just incase the worst happened!! Maybe I should just stop stressing!!!

Thanks once again for all the useful info :)... I feel quite naïve when it comes to EVs!!
 

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Thanks that's extremely helpful. I've not had issues so far, but will no doubt be putting the car (and REX) through its paces over the cold winter and see if any faults comes about.

Yes, it was pre-2017 - I looked for one like this inentionally to avoid the extra taxes!!

£375 still seems like a lot for servicing. Do you know if there are any independent companies that would touch an i3?

Another question - is the service interval 24 months? Mine was serviced Nov 2018, and on the panel it states next service due Nov 2020, but I thought they need annual servicing? The dealer told me 24m was correct and no service would be required proper to them selling it to me.

I'm just trying to plan things in advance and have some contingency ideas ready just incase the worst happened!! Maybe I should just stop stressing!!!

Thanks once again for all the useful info :)... I feel quite naïve when it comes to EVs!!
The i3 is serviced on time, regardless of mileage, once every two years.

Independent garages are only just starting to consider servicing and supporting EVs, there are very few and I don't know of any that will do electrics/electronics on an i3. One problem is not being able to connect the car back to BMW UK servers. Somebody should challenge the digital lock-out as a restrictive anti-competitive measure.
 
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