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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Really thrilled ive found this site. Ive found other Mitsubishi Phev owners complaining about
this same problem "Burning smell from the engine whilst the car is in ECO MODE whilst
charging. Another member on here says they approached there Mitsubishi dealer who said
"don't worry about the rubber burning smell,its only car parts near the engine getting hot"
but this greatly concerns me.
Can anyone else tell me ,if the car is in normal mode with charge on will the same rubber
burning smell happen
I'm afraid I have to agree that my friend and I could only reach the advertised 156 miles to a gallon
by charging the electric every 25 miles.so does than mean a 4 hour journey becomes an 8 hour journey
with all the stops for charging
Don't get me wrong I love the car but we all need help on how to get the best fuel economy and
this site is the best site ive ever come across
Looking forward to your replies
 

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Welcome Trevor -- I'm not an "Outlanderer" but I have heard of this issue -- I'm sure you'll soon get an answer from those who know.

The optimistic MPG figures are I'm afraid a universal feature of all PHEVs...!
 

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If your car is "new" then this is normal. It is the various lubricants and protective coatings burning off. The reason it's noticeable is that most ICE cars will have burnt this off during delivery but the PHEV (and I assume other hybrids) don't use their ICE for a while after new. Mine stopped after a few tens of miles equiv of ICE running.

Even Mitsubishi are honest in that their officially quoted mileage is only achievable when starting fully charged. More realistic figures for longer journeys are 40-50mpg. My own driving profile is mostly shorter journeys (20+ miles round trip) and I never get to the end of the EV range. Those longer journeys I do I get the 40mpg ish figure depending.

The sort of point of having a plugin-hybrid is to make the most of the EV while you can but having the ICE when you need it.

Don't charge using the petrol engine unless you MUST have battery for hills or towing. It is basic physics that you will always get better economy driving the wheels direct (parallel mode, over 40 mph) then charging and discharging the battery using the same fuel.

Also, until you are comfortable with the car don't bother with the buttons (ECO, Charge, Save) unless a specific scenario calls for it. These are outlined in the manual and it's really only about "Save" on a longer stretch of fast road, "Charge" before a long hill (or towing) and "ECO" does nothing useful except lower the accelerator profile and lowering the power of the AC unit.
 

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Can anyone else tell me ,if the car is in normal mode with charge on will the same rubber
burning smell happen
Yes, Eco mode only turns down auxiliary consumers and reduces throttle response. Its what @Peter Galbavy said, you can if you want to burn off the stuff run it in charge mode for a while, although I don't recommend running charge mode stood still its a bit noisy.

Mitsu have been upfront with MPG figures, and an edict did go to all dealers (as far as I am aware) They can only publish in adverts the NEDC figures but there internal literature should have MPG on a full charge, MPG on low charge (i.e. 0% reported) the latter being around 45-50MPG.

Unless your saving EV range for destination, I usually save charge for driving around centre of London, there isn't much point playing with the modes, just let it do its thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
They published figures based on the battery being empty here: Latest news on the Outlander PHEV - August 2013 | Mitsubishi Motors UK
Hi Peter, Thanks for your reply. Your a brilliant help. Just phoned the dealership and they said"never put ECO Mode on with the CHARGE button down.Something ive never been told before
A really think ,all dealerships should give better and clearer instructions on driving a new PHEV
but this forum site is really helpful.
Met another PHEV owner who drives his in B0 most of the time,lives in Plymouth and says he gets far more miles per gallon. Please give your comments,thanks
 

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Met another PHEV owner who drives his in B0 most of the time,lives in Plymouth and says he gets far more miles per gallon. Please give your comments,thanks
I too use B0 mainly, which I think will maximise the EV range under normal circumstances, as it affects what happens when you lift off the throttle. On a levelish road, coasting is going to be more economical than lifting off and accidentally regeneratively braking, speed dropping, then having to accelerate again to regain the speed.

As for your quoted Plymouth PHEVer, his higher mpg will simply be because he probably drives lots of short trips on battery and fewer longer trips. It's the ratio of short trips v. long trips that will determine the achieved mpg of the vehicle!
 

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Yes, B0 is the best use of the cars momentum on a flat or slight downward incline. D=B2 hence the slight engine braking and I am sure is the default as Mitsubishi determined that this was the best base setting.

Like I said, just drive the car without buttons (including the regen levels) for now until you are comfortable just get used to not being too aggressive with the accelerator to get the best economy. This can be judged by trying to keep the left dial in the green area below about 11 o'clock. Much more than that and the ICE will kick in to provide extra power that the batteries cannot on their own.

Once you are comfortable then start playing with the regen levels but be aware that regen braking without the brake peddle does NOT light the brake lights, so B5 will slow you fast or keep you steady on a steep hill but will not tell anyone behind you. My habit is now to drive in B0 (coasting) as much as practical except in stop/start traffic when I just leave it in D/B2 and switch to N (hold stick to right for 2 seconds) on the flat. I use the other B modes on downhills to stay at roughly the local speed limit (there are lots of 20mph zones near me) and use the stick to move between D -> B3 -> B5 more than the paddles.
 

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I have spoken to Outlander owners who have driven for a few hundred miles in a hit and are getting under 30mpg. It does appear that you have to charge staggeringly regularly to get the 100+ mpg claimed in the ads. So use as an urban tractor probably gets really high MPG, so for that type of use these are brilliant. They are also being admired as tow cars, but what you would get as an MPG from a tank towing, I shudder to think.
 

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Under 30mpg is impressive in itself if not towing. Must have been pushing 90mph up a hill into a near gale!

When I had Mitzi I used to regularly do a 300 mile roundtrip. Worst I saw when taking full advantage of speed limit 10%+2 without stopping to charge was 35mpg (charge saved for the urba Lin 15mi at each end). If I behaved and charged at least once each end I could approach 50mpg which was acceptable.

But @trevor stroud if you remember nothing else, DO NOT use the CHARGE button. It's very very bad for mpg. Charge the car plugged into electricity sources only never via the engine. It's only there for very specific reasons e.g. About to do some genuine off roading and have no charge (rear wheels electric only!), or towing a big load up a sustained big hill and need full torque e.g. Telegraph hill on the A38 to Plymouth. I never ever used my CHARGE button, leave it alone your mpg will improve.
 

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I'm afraid I have to agree that my friend and I could only reach the advertised 156 miles to a gallon
by charging the electric every 25 miles.so does than mean a 4 hour journey becomes an 8 hour journey
with all the stops for charging
I wonder if you have a case against Mitsubishi for breaking advertising laws. The Mitsubishi website headlines 156 miles per gallon!. That must break advertising guidelines.
Explore the Outlander | Hybrid Electric SUVs | Mitsubishi Motors UK
 

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There's huge potential for a multi-billion mis-selling suit not just for Mitsubishi but for all PHEV manufacturers.
Groan. Yes, sue car manufacturers that are actually moving automotive technology forward and reducing our dependence upon oil ... what a great idea.

PS. Oh yeah, and the fact is that the Outlander PHEV can achieve 156mpg in real-world driving. I've done it myself on the vast majority of my (shorter) drives.
 

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Again, it has been said in this thread and many other, motor manufacturers are ONLY allowed to quote the official test figures in advertising. Mitsubishi seem to have done right right thing in informing potential customers through other literature and through the dealer network. If anyone buys a car solely on one number in an advert then Darwin take them...
 

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Groan. Yes, sue car manufacturers that are actually moving automotive technology forward and reducing our dependence upon oil ... what a great idea.

PS. Oh yeah, and the fact is that the Outlander PHEV can achieve 156mpg in real-world driving. I've done it myself on the vast majority of my (shorter) drives.
Sorry @Eugene Lambert -- I wasn't being completely serious!
 
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